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'God knows what happened': North Carolina deputy fatally shoots Black man, but police release few details
Leaders and protesters in a grieving North Carolina community want to know what happened Wednesday morning when a deputy executing a search warrant shot and killed a Black man. An eyewitness said Brown was shot at multiple times as he drove away. "The people of Elizabeth City ... they desire a right to know what took place this morning," Councilman Darius J. Horton said at an emergency meeting of the Elizabeth City council on Wednesday evening. Outside the meeting, a crowd gathered, some holding signs proclaiming “Black Lives Matter.”"There is a moment of hurt in Elizabeth City," Horton said. I’m going to be transparent: I’m afraid as a Black man, walking around in this city, driving my car down the road," he said.
Columbus police release bodycam footage, identify officer in fatal shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant: What we know
COLUMBUS, Ohio – Officials urged calm Wednesday as more details were released in the fatal shooting of a Black teenager by a Columbus police officer – an incident that fueled renewed outrage over police-involved deaths. Officials identified the officer who fired the shots that killed Ma'Khia Bryant, 16, as Nicholas Reardon, who has been with the department since 2019. Less than six hours after the incident Tuesday afternoon, Columbus police released body camera footage, in which the teen apparently has a knife. Ma'Khia was transported in critical condition to a nearby hospital, where she was pronounced dead at 5:21 p.m., police said. Reactions:Activists say Ma’Khia Bryant's shooting proves that Chauvin guilty verdict just the startKiara Yakita, founder of the Black Liberation Movement Central Ohio, said she was not surprised by another police shooting.
How to talk to your family, friends about racism and white privilege
But how does someone, especially someone who's white, start (or continue) a conversation with family and friends about racism and privilege? Do your research:Before jumping into discussions about racism and privilege, it's important to educate yourself on these topics. Arnold clarifies that this approach doesn't pardon anyone who's been out of line, citing Amy Cooper and Christian Cooper, a recent example of a white person unnecessarily calling the police on a Black person. ), and ask, "How hard would it be for a white person to try and get ahead?" Going beyond the conversation:100 ways you can take action against racism right nowLooking for books about racism?
'A small measure of justice': GM, Facebook respond to the Derek Chauvin guilty verdicts
"Right now I'm thinking of George Floyd, his family and those who knew him. But real justice would be for George Floyd to be alive and in the arms of his family,'' she wrote. George Floyd was denied justice the moment Chauvin's knee took his last breath." Chauvin found guilty and nation reacts:Derek Chauvin guilty verdict sparks reactions across the nationWhat were the charges? Here's what the jury is considering for the death of George Floyd.
100 resources to take action against racism, help Black organizations and learn to be anti-racist
Donations help support the group's goal to "establish facts, expose failures and examine solutions for a criminal justice system in crisis." Donations help support the coalition’s work to “make sure that our communities have the resources they need to thrive.”19. Black Table ArtsThis organization helps "Black communities through the arts, towards better Black futures," according to its website. The National Black Justice CoalitionThis civil rights organization is “dedicated to empowering Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.”25. More resources for kidsThe D.C. Area Educators for Social Justice website also has resources for kids and teens.
How the documentary 'Street Gang' tells 'vast story' of influential 'Sesame Street'
“Sesame Street” didn’t start with Big Bird, Bert and Ernie. I was really hopeful to tell the adult story of 'Sesame Street,' the struggles and the dreams of these people who came together. “The origin is the most groundbreaking, the most experimental period of ‘Sesame Street.’ By reducing the vastness of it, we were able to make it stronger.”Making the movie opened “Sesame Street” in new ways for the filmmakers. “Jon’s like, ‘We’re going to put them together,’ and it was such a huge step.”Agrelo didn’t really know that at the very beginning, “Sesame Street” was directly aimed at Black inner-city children ages 3 to 5. We still have to open up our minds and our hearts, and this program is still very much a part of that.”
New Oklahoma law protects drivers 'fleeing from a riot' who hit protesters
Kevin Stitt has signed a controversial bill that would grant civil and criminal immunity to drivers who unintentionally injure or kill protesters while driving away from a riot. The bill is just one of a handful of Republican-backed proposals introduced in the Oklahoma Legislature this year aimed at cracking down on protests. HB 1674 protects drivers who fear for their safety while "fleeing from a riot" and also updates state law to classify as a misdemeanor the unlawful obstruction of a road or highway. Adriana Laws, founder of the Collegiate Freedom and Justice Coalition, said the Oklahoma Legislature has launched an assault on taxpaying Oklahomans. At least two protesters were escorted out of the building by members of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, who guard the Capitol.
Family of Ma'Khia Bryant speaks out after teen is killed by Columbus police
The family of Ma'Khia Bryant, who was fatally shot by police responding to a 911 call, remembered the teen as a "beautiful" and "sweet" girl, and questioned why a Columbus officer shot her. He immediately called the teen's mother, Paula Bryant. "Ma'Khia was a sweet little girl," Paula Bryant added. Ma'Khia Bryant. Hazel Bryant reacts after her niece, 15-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant, was fatally shot by a police officer in Columbus, Ohio, on April 20, 2021.
Sheriff’s deputy kills a Black man in N.C.; few details released about circumstances
Brown was shot about 8:30 a.m. as a deputy was executing a search warrant, Tommy Wooten II, the Pasquotank County sheriff, said. A sheriff’s deputy shot and killed a Black man on Wednesday morning in Elizabeth City, N.C., while executing a search warrant, authorities said. “What we are looking for at this time will be accurate answers and not fast answers,” Womble said at the news conference. At the meeting, several Black members of the City Council expressed pain and anguish about the shooting and said residents were hurting. As a Black man, “I feel like we are targeted,” said Councilman Gabriel Adkins, who was wearing a “Black Lives Matter” shirt.
Hartford appoints interim inspector general to investigate police use of force while the search for permanent role continues
In February, the civilian review board was searching to fill various vacant positions, including a new chair and additional members and alternates. Hartford planned to have a permanent inspector by the time new reforms to the board took effect at the end of March, after the position was initially proposed over the summer in light of the Black Lives Matter protests over the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor at the hands of police.
Olympic athletes promised legal support if they protest
Graham DunbarAssociated PressGeneva — Athletes who make political or social justice protests at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday by a global union and an activist group in Germany. The Olympic body’s legal commission should clarify what kind of punishment before this year's games, which open on July 23. The IOC’s athletes’ commission cited support to uphold Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter from more than two-thirds of about 3,500 replies from consulting athlete groups. In a statement, another athlete group, Global Athlete, encouraged athletes to “not allow outdated ‘sports rules’ to supersede your basic human rights.” It said the survey's methods were flawed. And the USOPC's athletes' group also put out a statement saying it was disappointed to see no “meaningful or impactful change to” Rule 50.
Can Formula 1 Star Lewis Hamilton Send a Message to the Saudi Government?
Hamilton describes his concern for human rights as being global, and has expressed concern about human rights violations taking place in countries that Formula 1 travels to. His willingness to speak out comes at an opportune time, as 2021 is the first year that Formula 1 will go to Saudi Arabia. By blockading Yemen's main port of Hodeidah, Saudi Arabia is intentionally starving an entire population. Shortly after Saudi Arabia allowed women to drive, they rounded up the very women who had campaigned for the change. Human rights advocates and F1 fans are glad Lewis Hamilton is part of the Black Lives Matter Movement.
Morning Digest: Why Biden's New Hampshire success wasn't downballot destiny for fellow Democrats
Thanks to that 8-point margin, Biden won districts representing 232 seats in the House, while Donald Trump carried just 168. En route to that victory, Sununu won an extraordinary 366 seats in the House to just 34 for his opponent. As a consequence, fully 153 Democrats sit in seats Sununu carried, more than 80% of the caucus; unsurprisingly, no Republicans occupy any Feltes turf. There, Republicans reversed the 14-10 majority Democrats won in 2018 and took a 14-10 majority of their own. Larry Hogan, fellow Old Line State Democrats have known about his interest for some time.
'Black lives don't f---ing matter': Video captures ex-Army man in racist 'all lives matter' rant
“All lives f----ing matter. Black lives don't f----ing matter.” He urged the person recording to make sure she got it, then continued with his rant. “Black lives matter is the most racist f---ing thing we’ve ever f---ing seen. What about white lives matter?” Miles said. I got a god--n Black kid in god--n Georgia.
Parent of high school student says students are being turned into 'activist' instead of being taught to think'
A parent of a high school student took issue with "critical race theory" being integrated into classrooms and children being turned into activists instead of being taught to think. "This is a tragedy of ideology called critical race theory. She wrote that the boy sent his "mother distressing videos from a mandatory lesson straight out of controversial critical race theory." Nomani wrote, "The lesson centered a Netflix film, '13th,' with controversial activist and Communist Party member Angela Davis and a biased narrative about policing in the United States. The 'Extra Resources' included a reference to "Black Lives Matter," with a link to the official website for the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation."
'He Was A Prince': Grief And Anger At Daunte Wright's Funeral In Minneapolis
'He Was A Prince': Grief And Anger At Daunte Wright's Funeral In MinneapolisEnlarge this image toggle caption Brandon Bell/Getty Images Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesMourners gathered Thursday in Minneapolis for the funeral of Daunte Wright, just two days after a jury there convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd. Wright's death, which took place as the Chauvin trial was underway at a courthouse just 10 miles away, immediately prompted protests and outcry. Thursday's funeral was held at Shiloh Temple International Ministries in North Minneapolis, where members of Wright's family spoke, along with the Rev. The reason for the traffic stop that ended in Wright's death has been disputed. Now, air fresheners have become a symbol of Wright's death.
Fallen British Empire soldiers overlooked because of racism, inquiry finds
At least 116,000 other casualties were not named on any memorials, the report said, adding that the number could be as high as 350,000. LONDON — Tens of thousands of soldiers from Africa and Asia who died during World War I in the service of what was then the British Empire were not properly commemorated, partly because of prejudice and racism, according to the findings of an inquiry issued Thursday. In other cases, soldiers who were missing had their names recorded in registers rather than in stone. The war grave findings come as British institutions grapple with a reckoning over racial injustice, fueled by Black Lives Matter protests that erupted across the country last summer. In World War I, the contributions of soldiers from “white-settled” countries such as Australia, Canada, and New Zealand dominated the narrative over other parts of the British Empire, the report said.
A look at religion as it’s experienced every day; an inspiring new children’s book; and a tribute to those Public Garden ducks
A woman named Donna Haskins tells a young man in Boston that he’d play basketball again, despite a hip surgery that had ended his college sports career. He took inspiration from the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti, and made a series of 23 paintings about the trial. Their success showed he could paint stories; he could paint the trials of people hard done by corrupt systems of power. He was accused of “being disloyal because he didn’t paint purple mountain majesties or America the beautiful. The prose is outstanding, both approachable and moving, and you will feel like each character is confiding in you their innermost hopes and dreams.
Al Sharpton says Minnesota needs ‘air freshener’ for ‘stench of police brutality’ at Daunte Wright’s funeral
Moments later, officer Kimberly Potter fatally shot Mr Wright, an unarmed, 20-year-old Black man, mistaking her gun for her Taser. During his eulogy for Mr Wright on Thursday in Minneapolis, civil rights activist Rev Al Sharpton took this as a metaphor. “We come today as the air fresheners for Minnesota. Mr Wright was killed by police towards the end of the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who murdered George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, during an arrest last May. Now in his name, in the name of Daunte, we’re going to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act as federal law,” Mr Sharpton said during his remarks.
Meghan McCain slams LeBron James for 'endangering the life' of Ma'Khia Bryant shooting cop
Meghan McCain has slammed LeBron James for allegedly endangering the life of the cop who shot dead Ma'Khia Bryant when he tweeted 'you're next' after Derek Chauvin's conviction. Arkansas Sen Tom Cotton was one of the first to call James out, tweeting: 'Lebron James is inciting violence against an Ohio police officer. 'People like LeBron James and his friends on the left are driving good people away from careers in law enforcement. 'A cop just killed a little girl and y'all are more concerned about Lebron James tweeted that the cop is next to take accountability???? Another wrote: 'I don't understand why y'all tryna publicly crucify LeBron James for a now deleted tweet that was TOTALLY take out of context.
Protesters call for the release of bodycam footage after black father of ten is shot dead by cop
AdvertisementProtesters have called for the release of police bodycam footage after a North Carolina sheriff's deputy shot dead a black father of ten. Andrew Brown Jr. was shot at multiple times Wednesday while trying to drive away, according to eyewitnesses. DailyMail.com has contacted the Pasquotank County Sheriff's Office for a timeline on when the footage will be released. Scroll down for videoPeople gather outside the municipal building after at least one Pasquotank County Sheriff's deputy shot and killed a Black man while executing a search warrant, the sheriff's office said, Wednesday. Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten II did confirm that a deputy from his department shot Brown.
'Hypocrites' claim as podium protests banned at Tokyo, Beijing Olympics after poll
More than two-thirds of 3,547 athletes polled said it is "not appropriate to demonstrate or express their views" on the victory podium, field of play or at official ceremonies, the International Olympic Committee said. "Citing 70% of athletes polled supported this. Taking the 70% claim at face value, I wonder what percent of those polled have been marginalized and targeted for hate." American hammer thrower Gwen Berry, who staged a raised-fist protest on the podium at the 2019 Pan-American Games in Peru, was even more damning. "The IOC are hypocrites who continue to silence athletes for capital gain," tweeted Berry.
The Saga of ‘BadVolf’: A Fugitive American Cop, His Russian Allies, and a DNC Hoax
But his primary focus was the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, and its elected chief, Sheriff Ric Bradshaw. ”In Palm Beach County there were about 4,000 homeowners availing themselves of Florida’s address confidentiality laws. Asked why the DNC emails were never published on DC Leaks, he seemed genuinely taken aback. Last year, Palm Beach County prosecutors charged Dougan with extortion and wiretapping, the latter presumably for recording the Jessica calls. A recent one took the form of a mock treatment for an imagined TV series about the West Palm Beach FBI.
North Carolina sheriff waiting to release body cam video of deputy shooting of Black man despite protests
The North Carolina Bureau of Investigation, an outside agency, was "immediately contacted" and is conducting the investigation into the matter, the sheriff added. The sheriff confirmed that it was a Pasquotank County deputy involved in the shooting and that the individual has been placed on administrative leave. "We’re going to let the North Carolina SBI do their job and we will have further information later on," Wooten told reporters. "The sheriff’s office has complete trust in the North Carolina Bureau of Investigation and its ability to complete this investigation," Wooten said. "Here we are again outraged to hear of yet another Black man dead, allegedly at the hands of those who are supposed to protect and serve," North Carolina NAACP President Rev.
Legislature: Elected officials must OK tear gas use by cops
A conference committee of the House and Senate met Thursday, April 22, 2021, to reconcile versions of a police tactics bill already approved by each chamber. A conference committee of the House and Senate met Thursday, April 22, 2021, to reconcile versions of a police tactics bill already approved by each chamber. The deal came as a conference committee of the House and Senate reconciled versions of a police tactics bill already passed by each chamber. One of the thorniest issues in the bill has been restrictions on the use of tear gas. Under the compromise adopted Thursday, officers can deploy tear gas at riots, but only with the prior approval of the highest elected official in the jurisdiction.
'This is our Selma moment': Racial justice activists hope Derek Chauvin verdict spurs larger systemic change
'We are able to breathe again': George Floyd's family relieved, thankful for guilty verdict against Derek Chauvin. A not guilty verdict, he said, would have prolonged the implosion of a nation he sees divided among racial lines. But we still have a way to go.”'We still have a lot of fighting to do'Activists and leaders cautioned that the path toward racial justice remains long. “And it’s important to name that in the struggle for racial justice. That’s what made the change.”This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Chauvin verdict fuels racial justice movement, BLM activism
The push to get vaccinations to underserved residents in southwest Phoenix started with a town hall
Arizona's top public health official and community leaders talked with southwest Phoenix residents in an over-the-phone town hall on Wednesday, answering their questions and encouraging them to get vaccinated. Thousands of residents in Phoenix City Council districts 7 and 8, which includes the 85009 ZIP code, tuned into the townhall. Christ answers questionsAbout a dozen residents asked Christ questions in the hour-long town hall. Local leaders call on residents to get vaccinatedThe Department of Health Services partnered with community leaders during the town hall to encourage residents in underserved communities to get the vaccine. Valleywise Health, in partnership with Wesley Community Health Centers, vaccinated a total of 482 over four events in that area.
Texas Senate passes policing bills, including requiring officers to step in if unreasonable force used
AUSTIN — The Senate passed policing reforms Thursday in response to the killing of George Floyd, including a bill that would require officers to intervene when witnessing excessive force. “George Floyd might have still been alive today had this law been put in place,” Miles said. Senate Bill 68 says police officers have a duty to step in if a colleague is using unreasonable force against a suspect. A far more sweeping policing reform bill, known as the George Floyd Act, has stalled in both chambers. The House version of the George Floyd Act, filed by Houston Democrat Rep. Senfronia Thompson, received a marathon hearing on March 25.
Newsday wins Excellence in Visual Journalism award covering 200 Black Lives Matter protests
The Newsday multimedia team entry "A Season of Protests," covering nearly 200 Black Lives Matter protests last year across Long Island and New York City, has been named the winner of the Excellence in Visual Journalism category in the prestigious Scripps Howard Foundation Excellence in Journalism competition for 2020. Newsday also was a finalist in the Excellence in Environmental Reporting category for its investigative series "The Grumman Plume: Decades of Deceit." "The Newsday multimedia team is honored to receive the Scripps Howard Award for Visual Journalism," John Keating, director of multimedia newsgathering for Newsday, said. Despite the dangers, Newsday photographers continued to work long days and often late into the night. The Scripps Howard Foundation supports philanthropic causes, with "a special emphasis on journalism education, excellence in journalism and childhood literacy."
Ma'Khia Bryant's neighbor says his security camera footage shows cop had no choice but to shoot her
Ma'Khia Bryant's military veteran neighbor has said his home security camera footage proves Columbus Police Officer Nicholas Reardon had no choice but to shoot the black 16-year-old because more people could have been killed if he hadn't acted. Reardon shot Bryant four times at around 4.45pm on Tuesday on the 3100 block of Legion Lane while responding to a 911 call about an attempted stabbing. In the bodycam footage, Bryant is seen holding a knife and charging at two other young women. Another neighbor agreed with the family, telling the Dispatch she didn't know why the cop who shot Bryant didn't use a taser instead of firing four bullets at her. Officer Reardon pulls out his gun and repeatedly shouts: 'Get down!
Meghan McCain slams LeBron James for 'endangering the life' of Ma'Khia Bryant shooting cop
Meghan McCain has slammed LeBron James for allegedly endangering the life of the cop who shot dead Ma'Khia Bryant when he tweeted 'you're next' after Derek Chauvin's conviction. Arkansas Sen Tom Cotton was one of the first to call James out, tweeting: 'Lebron James is inciting violence against an Ohio police officer. 'People like LeBron James and his friends on the left are driving good people away from careers in law enforcement. 'A cop just killed a little girl and y'all are more concerned about Lebron James tweeted that the cop is next to take accountability???? Another wrote: 'I don't understand why y'all tryna publicly crucify LeBron James for a now deleted tweet that was TOTALLY take out of context.
Murder rates go UP dramatically in cities after BLM protests, researcher finds
Trends in police homicides are seen in cities with BLM protests (red) and cities without (blue). The study, first reported by Vox, shows murders increased in the years following BLM protests even as reports of minor crimes tended to decrease. Campbell's research focused on changes in fatal police use-of-force incidents following major BLM protests. His paper offers several theories on why BLM protests might decrease police homicides, including by pressuring police departments to change their policies. In one unusual finding, he noted that BLM protests resulted in a decrease in the number of black police officers in a city by 6 percent.
Oklahoma Law Grants Immunity To Drivers Who Unintentionally Harm Protesters
Oklahoma Law Grants Immunity To Drivers Who Unintentionally Harm ProtestersEnlarge this image toggle caption Amanda Voisard/The Washington Post via Getty Images Amanda Voisard/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesA new law in Oklahoma increases penalties for demonstrators who block public roadways and grants immunity to motorists who unintentionally kill or injure protesters while attempting to flee. "When fleeing an unlawful riot, they should not face threat of prosecution for trying to protect themselves, their families or their property." Another provision grants civil and criminal liability protection to motorists who unintentionally cause injury or death while "fleeing from a riot." "In those instances, and we've seen them, even here in Oklahoma, it does protect them," Standridge said. And earlier this week, Florida's governor signed a law he called the "strongest anti-rioting, pro-law enforcement measure in the country."
Deputy fatally shoots Black man in North Carolina
The Daily BeastFacebookCrowds of demonstrators took to the streets in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, on Wednesday night after a man was shot and killed by a sheriff’s deputy executing a search warrant at his home. The Pasquotank County Sheriff’s Office said Andrew Brown Jr., a 40-year-old Black man, was shot around 8:30 a.m. while deputies were serving a search warrant in the 400 block of Perry Street in Elizabeth City. Witnesses told the outlet they heard a deputy fire at least six shots while he was in the car. The body cameras, that needs to be released immediately,” said Councilman Darius Horton, who donned a Black Lives Matter shirt to the meeting. On Tuesday night, a Columbus, Ohio police officer shot and killed 16-year-old Ma’khia Bryant after she appeared to have lunged at someone with a knife during a fight.
Police: Arrested Michigan lawmaker warned he'd call governor
The New York TimesCOLUMBUS, Ohio — It was Valentine’s Day when Ma’Khia Bryant, 16, moved into the foster home where her younger sister had lived for more than a year. “What if it didn’t work and she ended up killing this woman?” Still, Bryant’s family and activists across Columbus questioned why the officer shot Bryant. “I don’t know why he shot her,” Moore, Bryant’s foster parent, said. I question the use of force.” Don Bryant said he did not know how Ma’Khia Bryant had ended up in foster care. Ma’Khia Bryant had been enrolled at Independence High School in Columbus in February.
House passes bill that would make D.C. the 51st state
Walsh told “New Day” host John Berman, “Why don’t more conservatives say [‘Black Lives Matter’] yet? They’ve got people like Hannity and Tucker Carlson riling them up every day, John. Also Read: Tucker Carlson’s College Yearbook Says He Belonged to Club for Harvey Milk’s Murderer Walsh told Berman on Thursday, “I’ve learned. I listened to Black Americans and I understand why it’s important to say ‘Black Lives Matter. I listened to Black Americans, and I understand why it's important to say Black Lives Matter.
Mark McCloskey, St. Louis gun-wielding lawyer, mulls US Senate run to fight Biden’s ‘anti-American’ agenda
Mark McCloskey, the St. Louis attorney who grabbed national headlines last year for pointing guns at Black Lives Matter protesters with his wife, says he’s "maybe running for Senate" to fight President Biden's "anti-American" agenda. I'm still in the Lara Trump, Herschel Walker camp," he said on FOX Business’ "Mornings with Maria" Thursday. While city attorneys brought weapons charges against McCloskey and his wife, they quickly were vaulted to conservative stardom. GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE"The legislature is out there busily undermining our rights," he added. When it comes to a 2022 run for Missouri's open Senate seat, it may come down to a sense of duty for McCloskey.
Olympic athletes promised legal support if they protest
.......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... ..........GENEVA — Athletes who make political or social justice protests at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday by a global union and an activist group in Germany. The Olympic body’s legal commission should clarify what kind of punishment before this year’s games, which open on July 23. The IOC’s athletes’ commission cited support to uphold Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter from more than two-thirds of about 3,500 replies from consulting athlete groups. It pledged in December not to take action against athletes protesting at their Olympic trials for Tokyo. In the past, the NOCs have played a major role in sanctioning athletes who run afoul of Olympic rules.
Alternate juror in the trial of Derek Chauvin speaks out about ‘emotional’ testimony
An alternate juror in the trial of Derek Chauvin has spoken of how she cried watching the video of George Floyd losing his life. Lisa Christensen was juror No.96 during the 13-day trial. She was on hand to step in if another juror fell ill and did not take part in the eventual verdict. “I really felt that she felt guilty for not doing more and she feels responsible in a way, and I feel really bad for her”, she said. “So no matter what, I felt like somebody wasn’t going to be happy.”But later as the trial progressed she said that felt certain that Chauvin was guilty.
Donald Trump's Hollywood Walk of Fame star is replaced again
Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame has been unveiled again after it was repeatedly vandalized and boarded up during his presidency. The five-pointed brass star sits alongside famous Paramount film executive Y. Frank Freeman and director Irwin Winkler. Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame was spray-painted black in June last year amid BLM protestsAfter being painted black it was then spray painted in blue and further graffitiedSeveral later protests resulted in the star being graffitied with a swastika and other offensive writing. In June last year, a demonstrator spray painted the star completely black before a bag of dog excrement was placed on top. After acts of vandalism, the non-profit, non-partisan group Hollywood Historic Trust replaces a star.
Ex-Virginia Tech soccer player sues coach for 'retaliation' after she didn't kneel in racism protest
Kiersten Hening, a former non-scholarship player for the Hokies, filed a federal lawsuit against Virginia Tech coach Chugger Adair, saying he targeted her because he 'dislikes Hening's political views.' The program's all-time leader in wins, Adair is being represented by school attorneys, the Virginia Tech spokesman confirmed. Chugger Adair pictures coaching the Virginia Tech women's soccer teamShe claims her status within the team began to suffer in 2020. 'At the next opportunity — halftime of the Virginia game — Coach Adair berated Hening for her stance,' the lawsuit continues. Following the Virginia game, Hening lost her starting role, prompting her to quit the team entirely.
Olympic athletes promised legal support if they protest
Athletes who make political or social justice protests at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday by a global union and an activist group in Germany. The Olympic body’s legal commission should clarify what kind of punishment before this year's games, which open on July 23. The IOC’s athletes’ commission cited support to uphold Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter from more than two-thirds of about 3,500 replies from consulting athlete groups. The independent group representing German athletes pledged legal backing for its national team. There are three levels of disciplinary action for athletes breaching Rule 50: from the IOC, their sport's governing body, and their national Olympic committee.
BLM protesters storm Oklahoma Capitol over GOP bills protecting drivers fleeing riots, police from 'doxxing'
Demonstrators chanting "Black Lives Matter" stormed the Oklahoma Capitol on Wednesday, forcing the state House of Representatives into lockdown, in order to protest several Republican-backed bills, including one that provides legal protections to motorists fleeing riots. More than two dozen protesters filled the gallery on the fifth floor while the Oklahoma House in the chamber below was in session. One bill increases penalties for protesters blocking traffic and protects drivers who unintentionally strike drivers with their cars. Another aims to protect law enforcement and their families from "doxxing." House Bill 1674, co-authored by Republican state Rep. Kevin West and his GOP colleague state Sen.
Babylon Bee considers legal action against NY Times for calling satire site 'misinformation'
He’s still peeved that the Times accused his site of peddling fake news "under the guise of satire" and is now considering legal action. BABYLON BEE CEO BLASTS NEW YORK TIMES OVER ‘FALSE AND DEFAMATORY’ CLAIM THAT SITE PRETENDS TO BE SATIRE"We are contemplating and discussing with our counsel what the next move should be. The New York Times did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The Times added an updated line that claimed the Bee "has feuded with Facebook and the fact-checking site Snopes over whether the site published misinformation or satire." "They're using misinformation to smear us as being a source of misinformation," Dillon said.
Kiersten Hening Sues Va. Tech Soccer HC; Says She Was Punished for Not Kneeling
Armando Franca/Associated PressKiersten Hening, a former Virginia Tech soccer player, filed a lawsuit against Hokies head coach Charles Adair last month. Per court documents obtained by TMZ Sports, Hening claims in the lawsuit that she was punished for refusing to kneel with the rest of the Virginia Tech women's soccer team prior to a game on Sept. 12, 2020. After playing all 90 minutes against Virginia, Hening played a total of 34 minutes in the next two games combined. Davis noted that Hening's lawsuit seeks to have Adair undergo first amendment training and have her reinstated on the Hokies soccer team. Hening started 37 of 41 games for the Hokies in 2018 and 2019 combined.
Fargo’s chief talks with local activists about police reform
FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Police reform and racial equity are on the minds of many following the murder conviction of former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd. Fargo Police Chief David Zibolski met with local leaders of Black Lives Matter and another activist organization, OneFargo, on Wednesday to address that reform, which he said is simply part of the progression of law enforcement. A combination of sufficient training, more equipment, building relationships and public education are top priorities, he said. ADVERTISEMENTZibolski said he’s pleased with the verdict the jury reached in the trial of Derek Chauvin in Minnesota. He says body cameras are a necessity in order for the Fargo Police Department to build trust with the community.
'A Horrendous Tragedy': The Chaotic Moments Before a Police Shooting in Columbus
Those dreams were cut short after a Columbus police officer fatally shot Bryant on Tuesday afternoon, just moments after arriving at a chaotic disturbance outside her foster home. As the White House on Wednesday described Bryant’s death as “tragic,” law enforcement authorities in Columbus pleaded for patience from the community as they released 911 calls and new body-camera videos showing the frenzied moments surrounding her shooting. “Under any circumstance, that is a horrendous tragedy,” Ned Pettus Jr., the city’s public safety director, said during a news conference Wednesday. “What if it didn’t work and she ended up killing this woman?”Still, Bryant’s family and activists across Columbus questioned why the officer shot Bryant. Two weeks later, Andre Hill was shot by a Columbus police officer who was later charged with felony murder.
The Boston Globe
Erin McDermott is a visual artist in Los Angeles. This art was originally created for the book “The Art of Change,” all proceeds of which go to Black Lives Matter. Find more from the book’s 100 participating artists on Instagram @artofchange2020, and find Erin on Instagram @art_eries.
Bernard Goldberg trashes HBO Real Sports with Bryant Gumble over far left politics
Veteran broadcast journalist Bernard Goldberg has revealed that he quietly departed HBO's Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel after 22 years out of concern over the show's 'far-left' politics. My question to Bryant Gumbel was 'Do you think he should have lost his job over that?'' 'Bryant Gumbel, who has an opinion about everything, said 'I can't say.' During his tenure with Real Sports, Goldberg won eight Emmys, including for his investigation into corrupt Major League Baseball recruiting practices in the Dominican Republic. 'I not only don't accept their new left wing politics, it's also their holier than thou elitism that annoys me.
Ma'Khia Bryant's neighbor says his security camera footage shows cop had no choice but to shoot her
In the footage, Bryant is seen holding a knife and charges at two other young women. The neighbor told the Columbus Dispatch he came to the conclusion that the cop had no choice but to shoot Bryant after he watched his home security footage of the altercation. The young woman in pink and the person on the driveway are in front of them on the driveway. Neighbor Donavon Brinson (pictured) who handed the home security footage to police said, after viewing it, he believes more people could have died if the cop hadn't shot Bryant. But another neighbor said she didn't know the cop didn't use the officer who shot Bryant didn't use a taser instead of firing four bullets at her.
Ohio officials release more body cam video of fatal police shooting of Black teen and urge community to await the facts
(CNN) Columbus, Ohio, officials released additional body camera video on Wednesday of a police officer fatally shooting a Black teen who charged two females with a knife. Police body cam video shows Ma'Khia Bryant charging a young woman with a knife Tuesday before she was shot by officer in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State students gather on High Street to protest the police shooting that killed Ma'Khia Bryant. Police attempt to revive teen after shootingThe girl's mother, Paula Bryant, and the Franklin County Children Services had identified the teen as Ma'Khia Bryant. Hazel Bryant is embraced after her teen niece, Ma'Khia Bryant, was shot and killed in Columbus, Ohio.
NY Times ignores 18 deaths, nearly $2 billion dollars in damage when bashing GOP bills targeting rioters
The New York Times ignored 18 deaths, countless injuries and nearly $2 billion in property damage nationwide in an article slamming Republican bills designed to stop what the liberal newspaper considered mostly "peaceful" protests. Protests and riots following the 2020 killing of Floyd resulted in at least 18 deaths, $350 million worth of property damage in the Minneapolis area and nearly $2 billion nationwide. However, the Times didn’t highlight deaths or significant property damage when downplaying the protests as mostly peaceful. Ron] DeSantis, are labeling them ‘anti-riot’ bills, conflating the right to peaceful protest with the rioting and looting that sometimes resulted from such protests," the Times reported. The Times knocked a Florida law for increasing the penalties of someone caught toppling a monument by noting that "Confederate ones" are included.
Olympic athletes promised legal support if they protest
Athletes who make political or social justice protest at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday April 22, 2021, by a global union and an activist group in Germany. Athletes who make political or social justice protest at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday April 22, 2021, by a global union and an activist group in Germany. (AP Photo/File)GENEVA (AP) — Athletes who make political or social justice protests at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday by a global union and an activist group in Germany. The Olympic body’s legal commission should clarify what kind of punishment before this year’s games, which open on July 23. Coe gave his annual award last December to Smith, Carlos and the other sprinter on the 200-meter podium in Mexico City, Peter Norman of Australia.
New Hampshire advances some police, racial justice reforms
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Nearly a year after George Floyd’s killing, efforts to enact police and racial justice reforms in New Hampshire are moving forward, with some exceptions. Another bill inspired by last summer’s massive demonstrations against racial injustice passed the House and is now in the Senate. The Legislature also is considering legislation targeting the state’s secret list of police officers whose credibility may be called into question during a trial. It would ban teaching that the state or U.S. are fundamentally racist or sexist in public schools or state-funded programs. “Putting this language into statute would be a black eye for New Hampshire.
Ex-Virginia Tech soccer player claims in lawsuit that coach 'berated' her for refusing to kneel before game
Former Virginia Tech soccer player Kiersten Hening has filed a lawsuit against the team’s coach because she claims she was "berated" and benched by her coach for refusing to take a knee before a game. Hening claims in the 11-page lawsuit against Virginia Tech and coach Charles Adair that Adair was upset at her for not kneeling before a game against Virginia on Sept. 12. Hening did not play in the team's next game five days later and then quit the team eight days after the Virginia game. In the suit, Hening says she “supports social justice and believes that black lives matter, she does not support BLM the organization. Adair has been the team's coach since 2010 and was an associate head coach for five seasons before he was promoted to head coach.
In 2021, the complicated lives of Black music legends power Oscar’s acting noms
Viola Davis as Ma Rainey in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” (David Lee / Netflix)The men’s categories are crowded with music too. Yet this year’s field stands out not just for the unusually high number of music-related nominations but for the types of music involved. Pixar’s “Soul,” about a jazz pianist, is nominated in the animated feature category. Hollywood would say this is the fruit of its efforts to expand representation in the wake of Black Lives Matter and #OscarsSoWhite. Alas, it’s set in the world of hip-hop, which helps explain why Blank isn’t in the Oscars mix.
Olympic athletes promised legal support if they protest
GENEVA - (AP) -- Athletes who make political or social justice protests at the Tokyo Olympics were promised legal support Thursday by a global union and an activist group in Germany. The Olympic body's legal commission should clarify what kind of punishment before this year's games, which open on July 23. The IOC's athletes' commission cited support to uphold Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter from more than two-thirds of about 3,500 replies from consulting athlete groups. The independent group representing German athletes pledged legal backing for its national team. It pledged in December not to take action against athletes protesting at their Olympic trials for Tokyo.
Deputy fatally shot Black man in North Carolina while serving warrant
Gary D. Robertson and Denise LavoieAssociated PressElizabeth City, N.C. – A North Carolina deputy shot and killed a Black man while serving a search warrant Wednesday, authorities said, spurring an outcry from community members who demanded law enforcement accountability and the immediate release of body camera footage. The Pasquotank County Sheriff’s deputy was placed on leave pending a review by the State Bureau of Investigation, Sheriff Tommy Wooten II said at a news conference. Now his kids won’t never see him again.”Wooten said the deputy shot Brown about 8:30 a.m. It is home to a U.S. Coast Guard air station, Elizabeth City State University and a medical center, all of which support numerous jobs. Associated Press writers Allen G. Breed in Elizabeth City and Tom Foreman Jr. in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, contributed to this report.
Pelosi floats new proposal for bipartisan Jan. 6 commission
.......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... ..........WASHINGTON — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is renewing her push for a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, floating a new proposal to Republicans that would evenly split the panel’s membership between the two parties. Pelosi and House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy haven’t even been able to agree on whether the Republicans have been sent the proposal. Pelosi said in her letter Friday that ” we have once again sent a proposal for such a Commission to the Republicans,” but a spokesman for McCarthy said Wednesday that neither the Republican leader nor his staff have received Pelosi’s latest proposal. Pelosi has said repeatedly that she will not concede to the Republican demands on the scope. “It’s not about examining Black Lives Matter,” Pelosi said last week.
‘It’s a slap in the face’: LA activists protest mayor’s police budget increase
The system isn’t for us,” said Stephanie Luna, the aunt of Anthony Vargas, a 21-year-old killed by LA sheriff’s deputies in 2018. In the face of intense pressure, LA’s mayor, Eric Garcetti, last June agreed to some reductions in LAPD funding. The mayor’s office has cited an uptick in homicides and said the city needed to hire more officers to replace retirees. Advocates at the rally pointed at numerous reports of excessive force, policy violations and physical violence by LAPD officers at last year’s uprisings. “Nothing material has changed with policing in Los Angeles over the last 12 months,” added Kenneth Mejia, a housing justice activist and LA city controller candidate, who has published analyses of the mayor’s proposed budget.
Tokyo Olympics: Taking the knee for Black Lives Matter will be BANNED
Taking a knee during the Tokyo Olympics or lifting a fist in support of racial equality will be punished as the International Olympic Committee on Wednesday maintained its ban on athletes' protests inside stadiums, at ceremonies and on podiums. Against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement protesting racial injustice, calls have increased in recent months for a change to that rule that would allow athletes to protest. That is how I still feel today,' Coventry, a former Olympic swimming champion for Zimbabwe, said in a online presentation of the Rule 50 consultation results. Coventry said some 70 per cent of those athletes did not want protests on podiums, ceremonies and fields of play. The Tokyo Olympics, delayed by a year due to the pandemic, kick off on July 23.
‘Pervasive racism’ found in lack of commemoration for non-White troops fighting in Britain’s wars
“The events of a century ago were wrong then, and they are wrong now,” said Claire Horton, director general of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace expressed “deep regret” to Parliament on Thursday for the failures described in the investigation. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementThe inquiry was prompted by “Unremembered: Britain’s Forgotten War Heroes,” a 2019 television documentary. The Commonwealth cemetery in Egypt’s El Alamein for the dead of the World War II North African campaign carries the names of soldiers from dozens of Britain’s overseas possessions. Story continues below advertisementIn World War I alone, British colonies contributed 2.5 million men, mostly from India, which then included both Pakistan and Bangladesh.
As the voting-rights fight moves to Texas, defiant Republicans test the resolve of corporations that oppose restrictions
“Some companies have come out in support of voting rights and others have gotten more skittish,” said Sarah Labowitz, policy director at the ACLU of Texas. AdvertisementThe Washington Post reached out to a dozen companies or business associations that are headquartered in Texas or have a significant presence there. “You know the only form of voter suppression is when an illegitimate voter, an ineligible voter, casts a ballot,” he said. Democratic lawmakers and voting-rights advocates are hoping Texas-based corporations will use their muscle to help prevent restrictive measures from passing. The document, titled “Texas Voter Suppression Analysis,” describes the bill as being “at the forefront of the effort to suppress voting rights in Texas,” according to a copy obtained by The Post.
Opinion : Why Peloton is no corporate hero
Peloton said in a statement last weekend that it had “fully cooperated” with federal regulators and “at no time was Peloton trying to impede” their investigation. The practical effect was stymieing safety regulators and delaying a thorough investigation. But the Peloton model’s design, which differs from most other walking and running machines, appears to be especially hazardous to children. Peloton has practice in projecting the image of a corporate citizen concerned with broader social issues. Here’s a suggestion: Peloton should also consider it a human rights issue when its products accidentally injure or kill customers’ children.
Columbus shooting: Protesters call for abolition, defunding of police, reports say
Protesters gathered again in Columbus, Ohio, to demonstrate against the fatal officer-involved shooting of Ma’Khia Bryant, chanting her name and calling for the defunding of the city’s police department, reports say. Other demonstrators at the statehouse chanted "Black Lives Matter" and "Say her name: Ma'Khia Bryant!," according to 10TV. At one point, FOX28 Columbus captured video of a car racing around in circles in the middle of an intersection with its tires screeching. PSAKI CALLS OHIO POLICE SHOOTING 'TRAGIC'Two other officers, whose body camera footage was also released Wednesday, performed CPR and other life-saving measures on Bryant after the shooting. Another resident in the neighborhood, Tommy Taylor, told the Columbus Dispatch she was wondering why police didn't use a Taser.
Ohio probes police shooting of Black teenage girl caught on camera
By Gaelen Morse and Gabriella BorterCOLUMBUS, Ohio (Reuters) - State investigators in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday were probing the fatal police shooting of a Black teenage girl in a confrontation caught on body-camera video that appeared to show her holding a knife and lunging at two people. "She was a good kid, she was loving," the aunt told reporters on Tuesday, according to a video posted to Twitter. White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters that President Joe Biden had been briefed on the "tragic" shooting. The video shows police driving up to a chaotic scene, with several people gathered on a front lawn. "When officers are faced with someone employing deadly force, deadly force can be the response the officer gives," Interim Chief Woods told reporters on Wednesday.
Peacock TV's 'Rutherford Falls' deftly mocks white nostalgia
In the deft new Peacock comedy “Rutherford Falls,” which begins streaming Thursday, Ed Helms plays Nathan Rutherford, whose colonial ancestor Lawrence Rutherford gave his name to the town he founded. Rutherford Falls borders the reservation of the (invented) Minishonka people, who were there first. Ed Helms as Nathan Rutherford, overlooking a model of the town that gives “Rutherford Falls” its name. And as “the last Rutherford to live here in Rutherford Falls,” a badge he wears proudly, he is something of a tribe of one. Passing references to opioids and women’s shelters notwithstanding, Rutherford Falls is a TV town, superimposed on the collective memory that is the Universal Studios backlot.
Gov. Kevin Stitt signs bill to protect drivers who hit protesters while fleeing from riots
Kevin Stitt has signed a controversial bill that would grant immunity to drivers who unintentionally injure or kill protesters while driving away from a riot. Stitt on Wednesday signed House Bill 1674 from Rep. Kevin West, R-Moore, and Sen. Rob Standridge, R-Norman,The bill is just one of a handful of Republican-backed proposals introduced in the Oklahoma Legislature this year aimed at cracking down on protests. “This is an important protection for citizens who are just trying to get out of a bad situation," West said. At least two protesters were escorted out of the building by members of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, who guard the Capitol.
‘Holy Smokes’: Capitol Police IG Says There’s No Oversight Over The Force’s Board
The board has authority over almost all of the security decisions made at the Capitol, but received little attention until the January 6 disaster. Calls for its reform have become a bipartisan unifier as lawmakers look to improve Capitol security. During a hearing before the House Administration Committee on Wednesday, Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-GA) asked Capitol Police Inspector General Michael Bolton which “entity” has oversight over the board. She was noncommittal, saying they were taking a comprehensive look at all the elements of Capitol security. The revelation is just another reason we know so little after the historic security failure at the Capitol.
“A Lot of Training Is Focused on ‘Us Versus Them’”: How the White Nationalist Rot Has Seeped Into the U.S. Military
In the aftermath of the January 6 Capitol attack by supporters of Donald Trump, The Washington Post uncovered an alarming pattern. Of the nearly 380 rioters who have been federally charged, at least 44 are current or former military members, according to service records. The relationship between the U.S. military and extremism has been well documented. In 2017, a number of former service members were reportedly linked to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesperson, did acknowledge that extremist groups can be “waiting on the other side to recruit” veterans once they leave the military.
Now There Is Legal Justice for George Floyd. So Why Do I Still Feel So Hollow?
How many times have you watched George Floyd die? It felt flimsy against that awful, awful video. Despite feeling like the legal bare minimum, guilty, guilty, guilty is objectively good—a good thing that has happened after months of incredibly bad things in a bad system. I’m not naming the guy that did this to George Floyd because this is bigger than him; he’s part of a rotting system that needs triage. I recognize the guilty, guilty, guilty verdict is not a bandage for systemic inequality, but guilty, guilty, guilty sends a clear message: America will not tolerate this.
'Normalization of hate:' White nationalist language of America First Caucus sets off new alarms on racism
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says she's sorry for 'wrong and offensive' comments Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene apologized for previous incendiary social media post regarding conspiracy theories. What Greene is sayingRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Feb. 5, 2021. Nick Dyer, Greene's spokesperson, told CNN in an email Friday that the America First Caucus platform would be announced "very soon." Why the House removing Marjorie Taylor Greene from committees is significant The House has voted to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene from House committees. She referred to it as "a catcall to the KKK" in a text message to a USA TODAY reporter on Saturday.
Czechs urge allies to expel Russian intelligence officers in act of solidarity
The 12 jurors, who were sequestered and deliberated at a nearby hotel, did not have any questions for the court.“I would not call today’s verdict justice... because justice implies true restoration. President Biden and VP Harris call the Floyd family after the GUILTY verdict! There’s still a lot of work to be done, but if we get one [guilty verdict] then we can get more,” said Bishop Lord, 49.“I’m feeling a mix of emotions. I’ve been feeling F’d up ever since I saw that film of George Floyd, this guy kneeling on his neck. This is monumental.”WATCH: George Floyd's family reacts to the conviction of Derek Chauvin on all three counts in the death of George Floyd.
Today’s Headlines: The racial justice movement’s next step
AdvertisementNewsletter Must-read stories from the L.A. Times Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning. Enter email address Sign Me Up You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times. Leadership Change at LAUSDAustin Beutner will step down as the L.A. Unified School District’s superintendent by June 30, when his three-year contract will end. In Los Angeles, The Times wrote that many of the events focused on decreasing pollution — sometimes with dramatic flair. Support our journalism Subscribe to the Los Angeles Times.
George Floyd: a landmark moment for justice in America? – video
The murder trial of Derek Chauvin drew the attention of the world to Minneapolis, the focal point of the Black Lives Matter movement after the murder of George Floyd. In some parts of the city people have reclaimed the streets, while others are under military occupation. With the area reeling from yet another recent police killing, Oliver Laughland and Tom Silverstone spent time with activists, lawyers, witnesses and members of the Floyd family to see how this landmark moment in American racial justice is shaping the city
Only white people can be racist: Inside Global Affairs' anti-racism course materials
Try refreshing your browser, or Only white people can be racist: Inside Global Affairs' anti-racism course materials Back to video Through a freedom of information request, the Toronto Sun recently obtained one of the results of this new push: The official antiracist training materials for Global Affairs Canada. Kendi has argued that any policy that does not explicitly counteract white supremacy with favourable policies toward non-white people will inevitably return to a racist mean. This may be one of the reasons that anti-Semitism — a prejudice with a long and ignoble history within Canadian federal policy — is not mentioned once in the Global Affairs materials. This is apparent in the Global Affairs literature, even to the exclusion of inequity problems that are more unique to Canada. Nevertheless, course materials repeatedly take a view more in tune with U.S. realities.
The Sorrow and Relief in Minneapolis
On Monday morning, shortly after the final arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd began, members of Floyd’s family walked through the deserted streets of downtown Minneapolis toward the fortified entrance of the Hennepin County Government Center. “For some reason, I’ve been beating myself up, because I didn’t come to the store that day,” he said, of the day Floyd was killed. He had spoken on the phone with a brother in Los Angeles, who asked him whether Minneapolis was going to burn. Within the hour, several hundred people gathered in downtown Minneapolis for a rally. And they chanted the name of Daunte Wright, whose funeral will be held on Thursday, at the Shiloh Temple, in north Minneapolis.
Oscars Spotlight: The 2021 Nominees for Best Picture
Under the newly devised rating system, “Oliver!” became the first G-rated film to win Best Picture, and it remains the last. Two of this year’s eight Best Picture nominees are set largely in 1969, and they show what Hollywood wouldn’t bring itself to see back then. But what will this year’s Best Picture slate reveal to observers a half century from now? Before we find out the big winner, this Sunday, here’s a look at the eight contenders for Best Picture. But that doesn’t necessarily add up to a Best Picture win; last year, “Joker” had the most nominations, followed by “The Irishman,” “1917,” and “Once Upon a Time .
Mailbag: Breaking Down the ITF's New Gender Equality Research
We had a few questions about the ITF’s “research project examining sports gender equality across the media and social media, commissioned as part of its ITF’s Advantage All gender equality strategy.” It was discussed here: 'Level the Playing Field' Global Forum. Conversely, the conversation around women’s tennis is less intense and relatively more focused on life off court, from health and age to family. When you read: “There were 11x more mentions of skin colour in women's tennis,” that seems jarring, even appalling, at first; and then you realize that it is perhaps utterly reasonable on further examination. (I would submit that if race weren’t mentioned exponentially more with respect to women’s tennis, it would suggest a much bigger problem.) With that as context, is it at all revelatory that: “G.O.A.T was mentioned 50% more in men's tennis content than women's”?
HFPA in crisis: 8 past scandals that rocked the Golden Globes
For decades, the Golden Globes have, judging by industry pushback, maintained anything but a golden profile. Below, EW chronicles several past controversies that have plagued the HFPA over the years, from Pia Zadora's questionable acting victory to 60-year-old allegations that publicity firms schmoozed their way into the Golden Globes' winners circle. And it's a lot easier to curry favor with a few dozen HFPA members than it is to suck up to the Academy." 2011: Former Golden Globes publicist sues the HFPA over "payola" allegationsThree days before the 2011 Golden Globes, former HFPA publicist Michael Russell sued for $2 million, alleging that the group's members "abuse their positions and engage in unethical and potentially unlawful deals and arrangements which amount to a 'payola' scheme," according to CBS News. Now, in the wake of current scandals, the HFPA is reportedly facing several internal shakeups, including a potentially looming break with PR firm Sunshine Sachs.
Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict is short-lived justice
I went to bed the night the verdict was announced with a surprised, relieved, and tentatively hopeful feeling of momentary peace. She was killed moments before the Derek Chauvin verdict was announced. This is why it is impossible for the guilty verdict of the Derek Chauvin trial to be heralded as something it’s not. To truly understand racial trauma, however, is to recognise the way these structural forces impact the individual; how the political is personal. When it isn’t, small wins like Derek Chauvin’s conviction don’t feel like a cause for celebration, they render us numb.
Why Should Black Protesters Trust an Undemocratic Senate?
Republican legislatures are enacting a national crackdown on even the most ancillary participation in violent protest, including attacks on property. Violent protest tends to politically backfire, not to mention the fact that chaotic, lawless conditions tend to be especially harmful to low-income people. Passing police reform through the Senate already puts Black Americans at a staggering disadvantage. It is a system that dilutes Black voting power and gives white people a disproportionate say in the outcome. If Romney wants Black people to value the system, he should care about making the system less undemocratic.
Ohio Police Shot and Killed a 16-Year-Old Black Girl
On April 20, a Columbus police officer shot and killed 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant. The victim’s mother, Paula Bryant, and the Franklin County Children Services have identified the girl, who was in foster care, as Ma’Khia Bryant. She promoted peace.”Hours after the fatal shooting, Black Lives Matter protesters began to gather about half a block from the scene to mourn Ma’Khia. There, council president Shannon Hardin announced that the city had lost another Black person to police violence. But the truth is that nothing that we will do will bring this young baby girl back.
Every Movie Nominated for a 2021 Oscar, Ranked
Directed by: Richard Phelan, Will BecherNominations: (1) Best Animated FeatureIn the 20-year history of the Best Animated Feature category, only a handful of franchises have been nominated for their first two installments. Directed by: Aaron SorkinNominations: (6) Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor, Best Original Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Editing, Best Original SongThere was a dual sense of anticipation and dread, as summer 2020 turned to fall, for Aaron Sorkin’s take on the Chicago 7. Directed by: Emerald FennellNominations: (5) Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay, Best EditingThe boldness of Emerald Fennell’s directorial debut is what sticks with you long after its much-discussed and -debated ending. CollectiveDirected by: Alexander NanauNominations: (2) Best Documentary Feature, Best International FeatureLast year, Honeyland became the first film ever to be nominated for both Best Documentary and Best International Film, and it says a lot about the current state of documentary film that it happened again so quickly with Collective. Directed by: Shaka KingNominations: (6) Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (x2), Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Song, Best CinematographyIt took a long time to get a Fred Hampton biopic to the screen, and in Shaka King’s hands, it is a thing of fire and purpose.
Rep. Jody Hice: DC statehood vote – here's what Democrats' power play is really about
This week, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., plans to ram the next phase of Democrats’ strategy through the House: granting statehood to the District of Columbia. 43, if America’s capital were situated in any state, that state would wield tremendous influence over the federal government. Given that the approach is so obviously unworkable, why are Democrats so doggedly pursuing statehood through H.R. However, if Democrats honestly care only about providing full representation, there are less problematic alternatives that could win bipartisan support. Two additional Senate Democrats would be a tremendous advantage in preserving their majority, and that’s what this comes down to at the end of the day.
EU proposes new rules for artificial intelligence
Bloomberg(Bloomberg) -- For more than three years, Google held up its Ethical AI research team as a shining example of a concerted effort to address thorny issues raised by its innovations. On April 6, Google Research manager Samy Bengio, who Ethical AI team members came to regard as a key ally, resigned. That shift marked the foundation of the Ethical AI team.“This team wasn't started because Google was feeling particularly magnanimous,” said Alex Hanna, a researcher on the team. Their leaders have told them they will find a replacement for Mitchell and Gebru at some point. Their experiment to exist on an island within Google, protected by Gebru and Mitchell while doing their work, has failed, some researchers said.
Looking for things to do this weekend in central Ohio? Try out these events
Tickets cost $25 (various VIP packages also available). For more information, visit capa.com. Tickets cost $15 per device. For tickets and more information, visit woodlandsproductions.com. Tours are limited to those 12 and older, and tickets cost $30, with part of the price going to the Green Lawn Cemetery Association to maintain and preserve the historic cemetery.
There’s hope for racial justice in America. But it comes from the people – not the courts
Shortly after it was announced, CNN’s Van Jones called the justice department probe “a very big deal”; former federal civil rights prosecutor Jared Fishman called it “hugely significant”. justice has been served.” Ms Frazier spoke for many people across the globe when she saw justice in the outcome. There is truth in both arguments: Derek Chauvin is and was a vicious arbiter of violence, and that ultimately resulted in his murdering of George Floyd. Derek Chauvin the police officer was not an exception among other police officers, but a standard bearer. Prosecutors made clear that policing was not on trial; Derek Chauvin was.
It's too soon to call the Derek Chauvin verdict a turning point
The jury that convicted Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd got it right. The temptation to treat a jury verdict in a big case as symbolic stems, I think, from our powerful human tendency to use individual stories as metaphors in order to make sense of the world around us. And had Chauvin not been convicted of murder, the verdict would certainly have been held up as yet another instance of systemic racism. The jury was not asked to determine that Chauvin murdered Floyd because of racism, whether conscious or unconscious. A jury verdict can send a message, or try to do so, but a jury has no power to fundamentally change the system.
Olympic Games: IOC upholds ban on taking a knee and athletes’ protests at Tokyo
Taking a knee during the Tokyo Olympics or lifting a fist in support of racial equality will be punished as the International Olympic Committee on Wednesday maintained its ban on athletes’ protests inside stadiums, at ceremonies and on podiums. The IOC’s Rule 50 forbids any kind of “demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda” in venues and any other Olympic area and the Games body concluded the rule should be maintained following an athlete consultation. The IOC’s Athletes’ Commission chief Kirsty Coventry, who led a review of the rule, said the majority of athletes consulted were against any protests within the fields of play or the podiums. That is how I still feel today,” Coventry, a former Olympic swimming champion for Zimbabwe, said in a online presentation of the Rule 50 consultation results. Coventry said some 70 per cent of those athletes did not want protests on podiums, ceremonies and fields of play.
IOC says athletes who protest during Tokyo Games will be punished
The IOC’s Rule 50 forbids any kind of “demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda” in venues and any other Olympic area and the games’ governing body concluded the rule should be maintained following consultation with athletes. Some international federation chiefs, including World Athletics’ President Sebastian Coe, have said athletes should have the right to make gestures of political protest during the games. That is how I still feel today,” Coventry, a former Olympic swimming champion for Zimbabwe, said in a online presentation of the Rule 50 consultation results. The IOC’s recommendations are the result of a consultation process that started in June 2020 and involved over 3,500 athletes. Coventry said around 70% of those athletes did not want protests on podiums, ceremonies and fields of play.
Olympian Mechelle Lewis Freeman Is Paving the Way For the Next Generation of Track Girls
"[When] I was working there, they were managing athletes," Mechelle told POPSUGAR. "I want to showcase the influence and impact of women in the sport," Mechelle told POPSUGAR. "I want to showcase the influence and impact of women in the sport," Mechelle told POPSUGAR. Brands including Lululemon and JackRabbit have already signed on, and as social media makes it easier to spread awareness of now-dubbed "track girls," she thinks even more sponsors are on the way. There with the next generation of track stars is a place Mechelle likes to be, but caring for her own resident track kids is the ultimate goal.
George Floyd Was Also a Father
This similarity and connection, along with many others, have made many Black people feel a level of intimate proximity to the Floyd family and deeply distressed by what happened to George. Clint Smith: Becoming a parent in the age of Black Lives MatterI watched the Floyd family’s press conference yesterday, after the verdict was announced. Even if we have never experienced addiction as George did, chances are we are close to a friend or family member who did. …We, the jury, in the above entitled matter as to count two, third-degree murder perpetrating an eminently dangerous act, find the defendant guilty. …We, the jury, in the above entitled matter as to count three, second-degree manslaughter, culpable negligence creating an unreasonable risk, find the defendant guilty.
Vietnamese Americans Beg YouTube To Fight Misinformation
He started making YouTube videos to supplement his radio show for fun and has since cultivated a community, he told BuzzFeed News. While groups like PIVOT have launched efforts to address the misinformation, many young Vietnamese Americans told BuzzFeed News that they’ve faced language barriers and pushback when they criticize misinformation online. “They say these YouTube channels are on in their houses 24/7, even during dinner,” Duong said. Nguyen said that fear has been constantly reaffirmed on Vietnamese YouTube channels. Troung said his father had also repeated conspiracy theories from YouTube channels about looting and rioting during the Black Lives Matter protests last summer.
How You Can Get Involved With Stephen Lawrence Day
When Did Stephen Lawrence Day Begin? In a Guardian article for the first Stephen Lawrence day, Doreen Lawrence wrote: “I hope that the first National Stephen Lawrence Day will help to drive forward an important national conversation about how we can all build a fairer and more inclusive Britain. But more importantly, I want this day to inspire our country’s future generation into living their best life – in the same spirit as Stephen.”What Is The Stephen Lawrence Day Foundation? How You Can Get Involved With Stephen Lawrence DayAside from taking some time out of your day on April 22 to remember Stephen, the Stephen Lawrence Foundation has some suggestions of ways you can show your support. The Stephen Lawrence Day social channels are as follows:Instagram: @sldayfdnTwitter: @sldayfdnTikTok: @sldayfdnSnapchat: @sldayfdnFacebook: sldayfdn
Why New York mayor is ‘second toughest job in US’
It was during the administration of Fiorello LaGuardia that the position of New York City mayor became known as the “second toughest job in America”. The most pressing issue will be leading New York City out of the pandemic. An empty street is seen in Manhattan borough in New York City in March 2020. Reuters reported that a net total of 70,000 people left New York City in 2020, but the data is less straightforward. There’s a reason that the [population] concentration levels were as high as they have been in New York City – very good economic, social and political reasons.
George W. Bush Admits He's Thought About Commenting on His Successors as He Presides Over Citizenship Ceremony
For the Grant family, there were mixed emotions. Oscar Grant was 22 years old and unarmed when he was killed on a train platform on New Year’s Day 2009 in Oakland, California. It was the first high-profile killing by police that was caught on a cellphone video that went viral. The killing was later made famous by Ryan Coogler’s 2014 film Fruitvale Station, named after the site of the death. Protesters call for justice in the killing of Oscar Grant on 13 June 2011 at the US district court building in Los Angeles.
A secret donor has been paying for major Providence projects. Here’s who it is
ICYMI: Rhode Island was up to 143,740 confirmed coronavirus cases on Thursday, after adding 428 new cases. AdvertisementAlert: We can send the Globe’s Rhode Island stories to your inbox so you don’t miss any of our team’s great reporting! The Elorza administration disclosed for the first time Thursday that the secret funder is the Wend Collective, a social impact fund started by Walmart heir James Walton. Advertisement? Brian Amaral reports that methamphetamine — often known simply as meth — is a growing problem all around Rhode Island. WHAT’S ON TAP TODAYEach day, Rhode Map offers a cheat sheet breaking down what’s happening in Rhode Island.
How rock’n’roll found a new purpose by rallying around the climate crisis
But she is talking, in particular, about how we respond to the climate crisis as we emerge blinking into a post-Covid reality. As we mark Earth Day this week, it is clear climate change has become a catalysing moment for rock and pop. The difference is, of course, that the climate crisis feels far more real in 2021 than in 1970 or in the 1990s. And on 19 April, Brian Eno launched EarthPercent, a campaign aiming to help fight climate change by raising £70m from the music industry by 2030. He is working with EarthPercent and London climate change charity Julie’s Bicycle on a project that will bring voices from the Black community in south London into the debate.
LeBron deletes tweet saying Columbus police officer is 'next' after Chauvin
Basketball star Lebron James deleted a Wednesday tweet that called for accountability in the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old Ohio girl after receiving backlash for telling the police officer involved that "YOU'RE NEXT" following the conviction of former officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. "YOU'RE NEXT #ACCOUNTABILITY," the Los Angeles Laker wrote along with a photo of Nicholas Reardon, who has been identified as the Columbus police officer who shot and killed Ma’Khia Bryant. James deleted the tweet shortly after it began to draw criticism, including from at least two Republican lawmakers. Lebron James is inciting violence against an Ohio police officer. People like LeBron James and his friends on the left are driving good people away from careers in law enforcement.
When is a campaign not a campaign? Britain’s pseudo-left conceal refusal of trade unions and Labour Party to oppose Police Bill
The campaign against the Police Bill organised by these elements is therefore a political fraud, epitomised by the central lie and political conceit that the Bill is opposed by the trade unions and Labour Party. The reality is that Labour and the unions have organised nothing against the Bill. This is despite their acknowledging the role of the trade union bureaucracy in attempting to sabotage the Kill the Bill protests in the early 1970s. A universal feature of the Kill the Bill protests is the virtual absence of representation from the trade unions and Labour Party. On the Overseas Operations Bill, Labour abstained on its second reading before registering a formal vote against at its last reading—knowing it would pass anyway.
Notes on police violence: Multiple killings the same week Derek Chauvin convicted
Meanwhile, a crowd had gathered in the area to mourn Brown, protest the police shooting and document the crime scene. The shooting occurred Tuesday, only 20 minutes before a guilty verdict was announced in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the killing of George Floyd. It did not say who fired the gun.” Police then fired twice, and Wilson was apparently hit by friendly fire. In the bodycam footage, Hopp encounters Garner walking in the grass along the side of a road on her way home. I have to use force to safely detain her.”The witness asked Hopp for his supervisor’s name.
Biden uses “systemic racism” narrative to obscure class character of police violence
There is no doubt that racism is a factor in many police killings, but it is not the racism of the entire society. By blaming “systemic racism” and “white supremacy,” the reality of capitalism and class oppression disappears. Those who appeal to “systemic racism” as the cause of police brutality cannot explain why the largest share of those killed by the police every year are white. They seek to obscure the class character of the opposition to police violence and undermine a class movement against police violence. As a social phenomenon, police violence does not emerge from “white supremacy” or “systemic racism”; it is fundamentally rooted in the capitalist order, which police departments were created to defend.
Derek Chauvin’s conviction in George Floyd’s murder points to the power of video in police brutality cases around the world
They’re all saying the same thing: We won’t be able to breathe until you’re able to breathe,” Floyd’s brother Philonese Floyd said at a news conference Tuesday. “France isn’t the United States, but France is becoming like the United States,” William Bourdon, a lawyer for the Chouviat family in Paris, said at a news conference last June. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementIn the months after Floyd’s death, police were filmed using similar arrest tactics in Britain and Germany. But some countries could offer inspiration to those seeking police reform in the United States. AdvertisementBut while the world may not always like what it sees in the United States, it watches.
IOC Announces Athletes Will Face Punishment for Protesting at Tokyo Olympics
Koji Sasahara/Associated PressThe International Olympic Committee announced that athletes who protest at the Tokyo Summer Olympics will be subject to punishment. Per the Associated Press, the IOC claimed it sent out a survey soliciting opinions from more than 3,500 athletes regarding demonstrations at the Games. It's unclear what punishments athletes would face at this time. Per Kirsty Coventry, a representative for athletes on the IOC board, a "proportionate" range of punishments would be enacted. The Olympics, which were delayed one year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, are scheduled to begin with the opening ceremony on July 23.
The state of Washington DC statehood: What House Democrats are proposing and why it will probably fail
The White House has formally supported legislation that would establish Washington DC as the “Douglas Commonwealth”, the nation’s first new state since Alaska and Hawaii joined the union in 1959. The Office of Management and Budget said in a statement of administration policy that it endorsed House bill HR51. Known as the Washington DC Admissions Act, it’s likely to pass the Democrat-controlled House before withering on the vine of an evenly-split Senate like an identical bill in June 2020. Republicans call it a power grab to pack Congress – just as they accuse Democrats of wanting to “pack” the Supreme Court. “This bill is about two new Senate seats,” ranking Republican committee member James Comer said during the House committee hearing on the bill.
Melina Abdullah of Black Lives Matter L.A. says work ‘ain’t near done’ after Chauvin verdict
A Black Lives Matter protest Wednesday afternoon that focused on defunding the Los Angeles Police Department and disrupting police associations began with a collective breathing exercise. She stood on a stage in front of the American Civil Liberties Union building in downtown L.A., across the street from the L.A. Police Protective League. AdvertisementThe protest came one day after the murder conviction of Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who killed George Floyd last May. “This trash mayor … saw fit to release a budget that increases funding to LAPD even as LAPD shot eight people in 14 days,” Abdullah said. “Yesterday, I saw hope,” she said about the Chauvin verdict.
'Benin Bronzes' to be repatriated by Church of England are from 1980's
“Benin Bronzes” due to be repatriated by the Church of England were made in the 1980’s, officials have stated. Sculptures and plaques made for royalty in the former Kingdom of Benin and largely seized by British forces in 1897 have been the subject of renewed calls for repatriation to Nigeria following Black Lives Matter protests. The Church of England owns two statues which were gifted to Archbishop Robert Runcie by politician Prof Ambrose F. Alli and the University of Nigeria during an Easter visit to the country in 1982. Following a wave of repatriation pledges from UK museums, Lambeth Palace earlier this month promised to “return the bronzes” in its possession. But the sculptures earmarked for repatriation were likely made in the 1980’s and had no connection to colonial activity.
More than 100 protesters take to the streets to demonstrate against Ma'Khia Bryant shooting
More than 100 protesters took to the streets of Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday night to demonstrate against the police shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant. Bryant, a 16-year-old black teenager, was shot dead by a white police officer after she charged at two people with a knife. Protests and a vigil also occurred earlier on Wednesday with groups gathering to march and pray for the Bryant family. Scroll down for videoMore than 100 protesters took to the streets of Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday night to demonstrate against the police shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant. Officer Nicholas Reardon is seen standing on the scene after shooting and killing Bryant.
Oklahoma lawmakers confronted by more than two dozen protesters
More than two dozen angry protesters swarmed the Oklahoma House of Representatives chamber during a session on Wednesday to demonstrate against several bills that target demonstrators and trans girls. The House and Senate were forced to lock their chambers as the protesters entered the Capitol's House gallery on the fifth floor while lawmakers were in session. One of the bills the group showed up to demonstrate against was a Republican-backed anti-protest bill that shields motorists who strike protesters with their cars when caught in a 'riot'. Oklahoma is one of more than a dozen states where lawmakers are proposing restrictions on athletics or gender-confirming health care for trans minors this year. Opponents of the Oklahoma bill have expressed concern that its passage could lead to the NCAA moving its College Softball World Series, which is held each year in Oklahoma City and is expected to generate more than $20million in revenue for the city.
Columbus cop who shot Ma'khia Bryant 'is in Air National Guard and earned expert marksman'
The Columbus cop who fatally shot Ma'Khia Bryant, a 16-year-old black girl, is in the Air National Guard where he earned 'expert marksman' badge, it has been revealed. Nicholas Reardon shot Bryant at around 4.45pm on Tuesday on the 3100 block of Legion Lane while responding to a 911 call about an attempted stabbing. The Columbus cop who fatally shot Ma'Khia Bryant has been identified by the Daily Beast as a member of the Air National Guard. Columbus police on Wednesday released additional body camera video showing 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant lunging at another young woman with a knife before she is fatally shot by a police officer. Officer Reardon pulls out his gun and repeatedly shouts: 'Get down!
Podium protests banned at Tokyo, Beijing Olympics after poll
More than two-thirds of 3,547 athletes polled said it is "not appropriate to demonstrate or express their views" on the victory podium, field of play or at official ceremonies, the International Olympic Committee said. "The majority of participating athletes did not think it is appropriate for athletes to express individual views during the opening ceremony, on the podium nor on the field of play," an IOC statement said. "The respondents were most likely to believe it appropriate for athletes to demonstrate or express their individual views in the media, in press conferences and in the mixed zones." The decision to bar demonstrations could meet opposition given the widespread "take a knee" and raised-fist protests in several sports in support of the Black Lives Matters movement. The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee has already promised not to sanction American athletes for "respectful" demonstrations in support of racial and social justice at the Tokyo Games.
Philadelphia schools: America built on a 'pyramid of hate' culminating in 'genocide'
Students in Philadelphia public schools are reportedly learning about George Floyd and a "Pyramid of Hate" that begins with societal acceptance of biased attitudes that then culminates in "Genocide." Teachers can ask students: "Are you surprised to learn that police officers have used force that has killed people?" At the end of the lesson, the students are taught that "For many years, some police officers have hurt African Americans." CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPFinally, teachers are asked to discuss the "Pyramid of Hate," which illustrates the prevalence of bias, hate and oppression in society, according to screenshots of the documents. It starts off at the bottom with "Biased Attitudes" in society that then lead to "systemic discrimination" and "bias-motivated violence," which can lead to "genocide."
Florida's new 'anti-riot' law is unconstitutional, lawsuit claims
A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims Florida's new "anti-riot" law violates several provisions of the U.S. Constitution, according to reports. DESANTIS SENDING MESSAGE THAT PROTESTING IS OKAY, BUT RIOTING IS 'UNACCEPTABLE': FLORIDA SHERIFFDeSantis signed the "anti-riot" bill into law this week. The legislation increases the charge for battery on a police officer during a riot and adds language that could force local governments to justify a reduction in law enforcement budgets. DESANTIS SIGNS FLORIDA'S 'ANTI-RIOT' BILL INTO LAWThe law allows people to sue local governments over personal or property damages if they were determined to have interfered with law enforcement response during civil unrest. "These statutes are unconstitutional on their face," the lawsuit claims, according to the paper.
Raising a black son in America
This is one of them: I am white, and my wife is black, and I have nothing to teach my son about how to be a black man in America. It is my whitest, most naive hope that my son will never have to worry about racism at all. And the first black player who got to play on a white team was named Jackie Robinson.”“Jackie Robinson,” Nile repeats. “Probably not.”Hennick and Nile play at their home in a Boston suburb. On that night at the ballpark, I won’t tell Nile what happened.
Did Fox News host Tucker Carlson name-drop Harvey Milk’s killer in his yearbook?
It goes without saying that White is not the inspiring figure you would typically find mentioned in a college yearbook. On the morning of Wednesday, April 21, journalist Travis Akers posted a page from Fox News host Tucker Carlson’s 1991 yearbook from Connecticut’s Trinity College on Twitter. In his college yearbook, he listed himself as a member of the "Dan White Society." Still trying to learn which branch #TuckerCarlson served in https://t.co/rEGnLr7I4v — Ray Mabus (@SECNAV75) April 21, 2021Republican group the Lincoln Project tweeted asking “How many other hate groups is Tucker Carlson a member of?”How many other hate groups is Tucker Carlson a member of? And in July 2020, head writer Blake Neff resigned from “Tucker Carlson Tonight” after sexist, racist and homophonic comments he made on online forums came to light.
Oklahoma lawmakers confronted by more than two dozen protesters
More than two dozen angry protesters swarmed the Oklahoma House of Representatives chamber during a session on Wednesday to demonstrate against several bills that target demonstrators and trans girls. The House and Senate were forced to lock their chambers as the protesters entered the Capitol's House gallery on the fifth floor while lawmakers were in session. One of the bills the group showed up to demonstrate against was a Republican-backed anti-protest bill that shields motorists who strike protesters with their cars when caught in a 'riot'. Oklahoma is one of more than a dozen states where lawmakers are proposing restrictions on athletics or gender-confirming health care for trans minors this year. Opponents of the Oklahoma bill have expressed concern that its passage could lead to the NCAA moving its College Softball World Series, which is held each year in Oklahoma City and is expected to generate more than $20million in revenue for the city.
Republicans Are One Bill Away From Making It Legal to Shoot a Protestor Whose Sign They Don’t Like
Republicans, obviously, do not like these protests for a variety of reasons, chief among them being their insistence that racism does not exist. If he could have made it legal to attack a protestor for displaying a sign one didn’t like, he most definitely would have. Trump, of course, didn‘t get to that, his focus being turned elsewhere amidst his quest to overturn the 2020 election. A Minnesota bill would bar people convicted of unlawful protesting from receiving unemployment benefits, housing assistance, and even student loans. While the bill died in the statehouse, its lead sponsor, Republican State Senator Danny Carroll, said he would refile it next session.
‘Let them go with it’: Teachers lead talks on Floyd case
“I kind of just let them go with it,” said Garcia-Allen, a career and technology teacher. The school’s social services team provided a script for teachers who felt like they needed something to help guide conversations. At West Las Vegas High School, in northern New Mexico, several students said the verdict was not discussed in their classes. Teachers said they did not plan to discuss the case because they were afraid of appearing biased and getting complaints from parents. While she had engaged her students on the Capitol riot in January , she couldn’t find any other teachers at her school who did.
Sheriff: Deputy fatally shot Black man while serving warrant
The Pasquotank County Sheriff’s deputy was placed on leave pending a review by the State Bureau of Investigation, Sheriff Tommy Wooten II said at a news conference. Now his kids won’t never see him again.”Wooten said the deputy shot Brown about 8:30 a.m. Williams, the eyewitness who also was among those demonstrating outside City Hall on Wednesday evening, said Brown, who was known by neighbors as “Drew,” wasn’t a violent person. It is home to a U.S. Coast Guard air station, Elizabeth City State University and a medical center, all of which support numerous jobs. The city’s population is more than 50% Black and about 40% white, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Deputy fatally shot Black man while serving warrant, authorities say
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina deputy shot and killed a Black man while serving a search warrant Wednesday, authorities said, spurring an outcry from community members who demanded law enforcement accountability and the immediate release of body camera footage. Advertisement“When they opened the door he was already dead," Williams told The Associated Press. A car authorities removed from the scene appeared to have multiple bullet holes and a broken rear windshield. Now his kids won’t never see him again.”Wooten said the deputy shot Brown about 8:30 a.m. It is home to a U.S. Coast Guard air station, Elizabeth City State University and a medical center, all of which support numerous jobs.
Black man shot and killed by sheriff’s deputy in North Carolina
A sheriff’s deputy in North Carolina has shot and killed a black man while serving a search warrant, authorities said, raising tensions over policing in the wake of the Derek Chauvin trial and Ma’Khia Bryant killing. Wooten said the deputy shot Andrew Brown at about 8:30 on Wednesday morning. Court records show Brown was 42 years old and had a history of drug charges and a misdemeanor drug possession conviction. An eyewitness said that Brown was shot while trying to drive away, and that deputies fired at him multiple times. A car authorities removed from the scene appeared to have multiple bullet holes and a broken rear windshield.
Ohio officials release more body cam video of fatal police shooting of Black teen and urge community to await the facts
(CNN) Columbus, Ohio, officials released additional body camera video on Wednesday of a police officer fatally shooting a Black teen who charged two females with a knife. Police body cam video shows Ma'Khia Bryant charging woman with a knife Tuesday before she was shot by officer in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State students gather on High Street to protest the police shooting that killed Ma'Khia Bryant. Police attempt to revive teen after shootingThe girl's mother, Paula Bryant, and the Franklin County Children Services had identified the teen as Ma'Khia Bryant. Hazel Bryant is embraced after her teen niece, Ma'Khia Bryant, was shot and killed in a fatal police shooting on Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio.
Biden buys into the left’s great lie
President Biden had an opportunity after the guilty verdict in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial to reassure Americans that our legal system works and that justice had been done. No one defended Derek Chauvin. The prosecution of Chauvin isn’t enough, because, for the progressives and Black Lives Matter, it will never be enough. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listens to his verdict being read on April 20, 2021. He’s an uncle all right, he’s the one who shouts Black Lives Matter talking points at the Thanksgiving table.
Five Republicans who've changed their minds on guns
And yet, one can count on his or her hand the number of Republican lawmakers who, while in office, changed their position on gun control legislation during that period of time. I asked a series of gun control advocacy groups to help me compile a list. Peter King, the former Republican New York congressman who supported gun control legislation, recalled trying to talk some of his GOP colleagues into backing those bills. “There is a paradox that has always bedeviled the gun debate,” Jim Kessler, a longtime gun control advocate, said. Peter Ambler, the executive director of the gun control group Giffords, noted that more voters and politicians became comfortable with gay marriage as they began to know people who were gay and out.
Democrats fear GOP targeting racial justice protests
Black Lives Matter protesters gather in Wade Park to protest for Black lives and against U.S. President Donald Trump on September 29, 2020 in Cleveland, Ohio. | Seth Herald/Getty Images Democrats fear GOP targeting racial justice protestsRepublican state lawmakers across the country are pushing legislatures to pass dozens of anti-protest measures, sparking concerns among Democrats and others that states will begin cracking down harder on racial justice and anti-police brutality demonstrations. You could say the same for Florida.”So far, Tennessee, Florida and Oklahoma are the only states to pass “anti-riot” legislation. Oklahoma’s governor approved its “anti-riot” bill, HB 1674, on Wednesday. “We are seeing Republicans conflate our movement with the white supremacist rioters who attacked the Capitol,” Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation stated.
‘Let them go with it’: Teachers lead talks on Floyd case
“I kind of just let them go with it,” said Garcia-Allen, a career and technology teacher. The school’s social services team provided a script for teachers who felt like they needed something to help guide conversations. At West Las Vegas High School, in northern New Mexico, several students said the verdict was not discussed in their classes. Teachers said they did not plan to discuss the case because they were afraid of appearing biased and getting complaints from parents. While she had engaged her students on the Capitol riot in January , she couldn’t find any other teachers at her school who did.
Sheriff: Deputy fatally shot Black man while serving warrant
The Pasquotank County Sheriff’s deputy was placed on leave pending a review by the State Bureau of Investigation, Sheriff Tommy Wooten II said at a news conference. Wooten said the deputy shot Brown about 8:30 a.m. “I’m afraid as a Black man,” an emotional Councilman Gabriel Adkins told his colleagues. It is home to a U.S. Coast Guard air station, Elizabeth City State University and a medical center, all of which support numerous jobs. The city’s population is more than 50% Black and about 40% white, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Florida governor sued over new anti-riot law that may infringe on civil liberties
Ron DeSantis and others two days after the Republican signed a bill to create tougher penalties for people who participate in violent protests. The nonprofit group Legacy Entertainment & Arts Foundation filed the lawsuit Wednesday in Orlando federal court, according to court records. DeSantis spokesman Cody McCloud said the governor’s office hasn’t yet been served in the case but will firmly defend the legal merits of the new law, which McCloud said protects businesses, supports law enforcement and ensures punishment for those who cause violence. The new law enhances penalties for crimes committed during a riot or violent protest. It also strips local governments of civil liability protections if they interfere with law enforcement’s efforts to respond to a violent protest and adds language to state law that could force local governments to justify a reduction in law enforcement budgets.
Sheriff: Deputy fatally shot Black man while serving warrant
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina deputy shot and killed a Black man while serving a search warrant Wednesday, authorities said, spurring an outcry from community members who demanded law enforcement accountability and the immediate release of body camera footage. The Pasquotank County Sheriff’s deputy was placed on leave pending a review by the State Bureau of Investigation, Sheriff Tommy Wooten II said at a news conference. Story continuesWooten said the deputy shot Brown about 8:30 a.m. It is home to a U.S. Coast Guard air station, Elizabeth City State University and a medical center, all of which support numerous jobs. The city’s population is more than 50% Black and about 40% white, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Emboldened by Chauvin verdict, protesters march against police brutality in Boston
As thunderstorms rolled through Boston Wednesday evening, activists marched through the city, calling for an end to police brutality one day after Derek Chauvin, a white former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted for the death of George Floyd. “It’s an awesome verdict, but it’s just the bare minimum,” said Fenner Dreyfuss-Wells, a 19-year-old Northeastern University student. “As much as I would love to be in a celebratory mode in regards to what happened with George Floyd, the truth is not justice,” one organizer told the gathering of about 80 people. Although Childs, 70, of Somerville, does not think Tuesday’s verdict will change policing, he said it will affirm the impact of demonstrations and protests. “In the days ahead, let us honor the legacy of George Floyd with the shared work of dismantling structural racism” Janey said in a statement.
9½ minutes of silence as Denver students weigh impact of conviction in George Floyd’s murder
As much as students were grateful for the conviction, they know that much work remains to be done. Ninth-grader Graça Jovelino bowed her head as she held a drawing she had made of Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. We shouldn’t be mistreated.”Charlotte Anderson, student body co-president at South, said she started crying when she heard the verdict. As a young Black woman, Floyd’s murder and those of so many others have hit close to home. It’s also been surprising to see the case serve as a wake-up call for white Americans.
LeBron James deletes tweet on Ma’Khia Bryant police shooting
NBA star LeBron James targeted the Ohio cop who shot and killed Ma’Khia Bryant, saying, “YOU’RE NEXT” in a since-deleted tweet. LeBron James’ now-deleted tweet. James later deleted it, Fox said. “ACCOUNTABILITY,” James, who has long been a vocal supporter of Black Lives Matter and has spoken out on racial justice issues, tweeted after the verdict. Authorities in Ohio said Wednesday identified Reardon as the officer who shot Bryant, and said that state investigators are now probing the incident.
Opinion : The system that convicted Chauvin usually doesn’t work
Without that testimony, without the unanimity from Minneapolis Police Department trainers and leadership that Chauvin had violated policy, it seems unlikely he would have been convicted. Former officer Mohamed Noor, a Somali immigrant, was convicted of murder in 2019 for shooting and killing Justine Ruszczyk in 2017. Chauvin’s conviction struck a blow for justice, but this isn’t how the system operates most of the time. It’s how the system operated once, under immense public scrutiny and extremely favorable conditions, with incredibly damning evidence. A system that requires so much merely to hold one of its own to account is a system badly in need of repair.
Chauvin trial political fallout: Groundbreaking verdict, same fault lines
Yet on the Republican side, nearly the opposite was true — few lawmakers saw a need to weigh in at all. Republicans, in an overt appeal to suburban whites, responded to a summer of civil uprisings with calls for law and order. In the run-up to the Chauvin verdict, Republican attention remained fixed on the protests against police brutality, marked by the introduction of legislation in more than 30 states to constrain protests. Surveying the political fallout from the verdict, Florida state Rep. Omari Hardy, a Black progressive who has been pushing for legislation that rethinks policing, said, the “verdict doesn’t change a thing. And just moments after the verdict was read, there was news of another fatal police shooting: 16-year-old, Ma’Khia Bryant.
A former Minneapolis police officer called Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict a 'tragedy,' saying he fears it will start a 'new trend' of sending cops to prison
Derek Chauvin listening as his verdict is read. Court TV via APA former Minneapolis police officer said he was surprised by Derek Chauvin's conviction. He worked for the Minneapolis Police Department for nearly three decades before quitting days before Chauvin's trial began. The former officer said the jury finding Chauvin guilty on all three charges was "not at all" what he expected, and called it a "tragedy." People at the site of George Floyd's death react to the news of Chauvin's guilty verdict on April 20.
Columbus police have identified the officer who fatally shot 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant
Black Lives Matter activists confront police officers in Columbus, Ohio, during a protest in reaction to the shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant on Tuesday. Stephen Zenner/Getty ImagesThe police in Columbus, Ohio, identified the officer who shot and killed Ma'Khia Bryant. The police said Nicholas Reardon fired the shot that killed Bryant. The police in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday identified Nicholas Reardon as the police officer who shot and killed 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant on Tuesday. Bryant runs away from the officer and appears to swing what the police described as a knife at another girl.
Roderick Sykes, co-founder of L.A. Black art enclave St. Elmo Village, dies
Sykes and his uncle, Rozzell Sykes, both visual artists, founded St. Elmo Village in 1969. Occupying land that once served as silent film star Mary Pickford’s horse farm and named for the street it’s on, St. Elmo Village became a nonprofit in 1971. This last part will take $2 million, which St. Elmo Village is working to raise. There never were — and still aren’t — any gates at St. Elmo Village, and everyone is welcome. Six months later, she packed her bags, moved to St. Elmo Village and never looked back.
Two first-time candidates challenging Paula Blackmon for Dallas City Council District 9 seat
The Dallas City Council elections are May 1, and early voting started Monday. Two challengers will try to unseat incumbent Paula Blackmon in the Dallas City Council District 9 race on May 1. And now we’re back to attacking our police force, and we’re sending a message from City Hall that we are not going to support them.”Spring 2021 Election Candidates for Dallas City Council - District 9 Compare the candidates’ answers to our questions in our Voter Guide. During her time on the council, Blackmon has opposed many of Johnson’s policies. I see him pushing towards the data, especially in terms of equity issues.”District 9 City Council candidates
Gov. Kevin Stitt signs bill to protect drivers who hit protesters while fleeing from riots
Kevin Stitt has signed a controversial bill that would grant immunity to drivers who unintentionally injure or kill protesters while driving away from a riot. Stitt on Wednesday signed House Bill 1674 from Rep. Kevin West, R-Moore, and Sen. Rob Standridge, R-Norman,The bill is just one of a handful of Republican-backed proposals introduced in the Oklahoma Legislature this year aimed at cracking down on protests. “This is an important protection for citizens who are just trying to get out of a bad situation," West said. At least two protesters were escorted out of the building by members of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, who guard the Capitol.
McCarthy says Democrats 'hurt George Floyd's family' by failing to censure Maxine Waters
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy criticized Democrats for not censuring Rep. Maxine Waters, saying Wednesday that the decision hurts 'George Floyd's family, as she put the verdict of the Derek Chauvin case 'in jeopardy.' 'Well you know the Democrats had an ability to condemn those types of actions,' McCarthy said. 'I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty,' she told reporters at the scene, speaking about Chauvin, who was on trial for the Memorial Day 2020 killing of George Floyd. McCarthy pointed out to Brody that his censure resolution was narrow in scope - as it only quoted Waters and then Cahill. 'The one thing I do understand what the judge said, was what Maxine Waters did was abhorrent,' McCarthy answered.
Cities Drop Most Charges Against BLM Protesters as Cops Fail to Provide Evidence
In Houston and Los Angeles, The Guardian found, 93 percent of charges were either dropped or never filed; in some cities like Dallas and Philadelphia, that number rose to 95 percent of charges dropped or never prosecuted. Instead, officers filed felony charges like assault and looting with no evidence, ultimately forcing the charges to be dropped or dismissed. The high proportion of charges being dropped is also a stark illustration of how left-wing protesters are punished or face the threat of punishment much more often than right-wing protesters. An analysis of protests from last year found that police are three times more likely to use force against left-wing protesters than right-wing ones. There’s evidence that protest suppression, especially against left-wing protesters in the U.S. and internationally, is getting worse.
Brooklyn protest suggests BLM is just about hate and rage
We don’t want your f—ing taqueria, owned by f—ing white men!”What’s the ideology here? And this was just a less genteel version of the now-years-old phenomenon wherein BLMers barge into restaurants and lecture about racism, etc. The slogan “Black lives matter” is something Americans support. But the second-favorite phrase, “All cops are bastards,” tells you this movement’s “ideals” quickly boil down to ignorant hatred. And actions of activists like that Brooklyn mob suggest that, for all too many of them, the whole thing is little more than an excuse for incoherent hate and rage.
Opinion : The disturbing link between Tucker Carlson and Marjorie Taylor Greene
Carlson hammered away at the wildly exaggerated idea that the police were allowing the country to succumb to chaos throughout the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests. AdvertisementWe talk constantly about the radicalization of figures such as Carlson and Greene and of the GOP. AdvertisementAfter all, if widespread voter fraud can simply be asserted, then overturning an election result can magically be made legitimate. AdvertisementField’s preoccupation is with intellectuals, but this framework can be usefully applied to the likes of Greene and Carlson. Greene’s now-infamous flirtations with political violence have been explicitly about beating back various leftist tyrannies that were simply asserted.
Columbus police release more video, details in shooting death of 16-year-old girl
Police in Columbus, Ohio, released more body-camera video Wednesday showing an officer's point of view as he pulled his weapon, opened fire and killed a 16-year-old girl while responding to a 911 call. Police have said the video shows someone trying to stab a person on the ground, as well as a second person. The girl whom police shot and killed was identified as Ma'Khia Bryant, 16. A representative for the union representing Columbus police could not be immediately reached for comment Wednesday afternoon. "We try, but it is not a policy requirement that you yell your intent to fire your weapon," Woods said.
Opinion: After the Chauvin verdict, we all must speak loudly against racism and police violence where and when we see it
As I got ready to drive downtown, I heard reports that the verdict was going to be announced within the hour. The evidence against Chauvin was overwhelming, including compelling statements from fellow police officers who testified against Chauvin. Rage would be understandable if Chauvin was not convicted on all counts, but I didn’t want to be caught in the middle of it. I listened to more coverage of the Chauvin verdict and grew encouraged. For starters, we can speak up when others condone racism and police violence.
EXPLAINER: Chauvin jury could stay anonymous for a long time
Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill hasn't said how long their names might stay secret. HOW LONG MIGHT IDs OF CHAUVIN JURY STAY SECRET? Names of jurors and other data such as questionnaires normally become public soon after trials in Minnesota. Story continuesMinnesota first empaneled an anonymous jury for the 1993 trial of alleged gang member Shannon Bowles in the slaying of Minneapolis police Officer Jerry Haaf in 1992, according to the William Mitchell Law Review. 19, a white man in his 30s who said during jury selection that he works as an auditor.
Ohio police fatally shoot Black teenage girl just before Chauvin verdict
A knife is visible in the driveway next to the girl as police perform CPR on her. Neighbor Ira Graham III said that he had just come home from work when he heard shots and ran outside to see a teen girl on the ground badly wounded. The officer fires four shots at the girl, leaving her sprawled next to a car in the driveway. Video taken at the scene by a neighbor shortly after the shooting shows two police officers kneeling over the girl. They deserve answers,’' Columbus director of Public Safety Ned Pettus Jr. said.
Assembly task force proposes policing changes as Evers orders state police to review use of force policies
A spokeswoman said the task force will continue to work on the definition of excessive force. "Devastating instances of police violence highlighted the need to reform our policing system," task force co-chairwoman Rep. Shelia Stubbs, D- Madison, said in a statement. However, I will not support anything that jeopardizes public safety or the safety of our law enforcement officers," Wanggaard said. Making new legal consequences to discourage people from unnecessarily calling law enforcement with the intent to cause adverse outcomes. Steineke received criticism over the creation of the task force earlier this year after an Aug. 24 email surfaced in which Steineke framed the effort of the task force as a "political loser."
IOC: Athlete protests remain banned at Tokyo Olympics
Associated PressLausanne, Switzerland — Athlete protests and political messages will remain banned at the Olympics, the IOC said Wednesday, after a survey found that a majority of competitors were in favor of keeping the ban in place. Smith and Carlos were both expelled from the 1968 Olympics after their salute. Approved words on T-shirts and elsewhere in Tokyo are “peace, respect, solidarity, inclusion and equality,” the IOC said. The IOC research consulted officially recognized athlete panels from national Olympic committees and sports governing bodies — a process that restricted input from activist athletes. Other concessions agreed Wednesday include adding references to “inclusion and equality” in the Olympic Oath read at the opening ceremony in Tokyo on July 23.
Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski breaks ranks and votes to confirm Biden DOJ nominee
The Senate on Wednesday confirmed Joe Biden's nominee for associate attorney general after Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski broke ranks and voted for the president's pick. Vanita Gupta was confirmed for the number three spot at the Justice Department in a narrow 51-49 vote. Gupta is the first woman of color and first civil rights lawyer to hold to hold the DoJ position. Because this has clearly been very hard on her as a nominee,' Murkowski said in a speech on the Senate floor. 'I am going to give the benefit of the doubt to a woman who I believe has demonstrated throughout her professional career to be deeply, deeply committed to matters of justice,' Murkowski added.
Racial Justice Is a Global Issue
Last summer, Black Lives Matter protests in the United States after the murder of George Floyd echoed around the world. Today’s global crises—police violence, a global pandemic, the climate emergency, and many more—require action wherever we live. Global inequalities play out on so many issues like these that it is no exaggeration to talk of a more general "global apartheid." U.S. policy on global issues will not change fundamentally without widespread public demand. The obstacles to global solidarity may seem overwhelming.
RAGING BULLSH!T: Tucker Carlson Hosts Candace Owens's Rancid Post-Verdict Rant on Fox News
On Tuesday night Fox News presented another episode of Tucker Carlson's White Power Hour. Because Fox News wants their audience to think that there were civil disturbances happening currently in response to the verdicts. Carlson began his interview by belittling the verdicts that he claimed were the result of viewing "a murder case through the lens of politics." That's a good question considering that it is Carlson who is forcing the case to be viewed through a political lens. It's not the first time that Carlson has equated the loss of white power to the end of civilization.
Kagro in the Morning podcast (AUDIO): Wednesday, April 21 2021
David Waldman gets us over the hump, that many of us will sled down this morning. Accountability, and maybe a step towards justice took place last night, as Black lives mattered, for a moment. People keep coming up with clever ways to convince boneheads, but boneheads hate experts almost as much as they hate math. The House has been frozen at 435 representatives, but just like those 9 Supreme Court justices, that’s just a number. Democrats blocked Republican censure of Maxine Waters until the Gop cleaned up its own act.
Labor activist Dolores Huerta reflects on her decades-long fight for workers’ rights
Huerta turns 91 years old on April 10, and her birthday has been recognized as Dolores Huerta Day in her home state of California since 2018. We’re raising money to give to families who aren’t able to get resources, like a lot of undocumented families. Huerta: I think in some respects it’s easier because social media can inform, educate, and mobilize people. Huerta: I think that’s a really great question and I think that’s something that we’re not really exploring enough. If the first person you’re trying to organize rejects you, that’s okay, go to the next person.
Tucker "soup plutocrat" Carlson even further unhinged
“The jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial came to a unanimous and unequivocal verdict this afternoon: ‘Please don’t hurt us,’” Carlson said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” Carlson added, "Everyone understood perfectly well the consequences of an acquittal in this case. pic.twitter.com/mBOxrsbhaJ — Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 21, 2021Fox News host Tucker Carlson behaved strangely on the air Tuesday night. Carlson, who spent months spreading lies about Floyd’s death and railing against the Black Lives Matter movement it reignited, invited former New York corrections official Ed Gavin on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” to speak after the verdict. Tucker Carlson simply cuts off the conversation when an alternate sentiment intrudes. "https://t.co/OOdav4ZSKi — Greg Sargent (@ThePlumLineGS) April 21, 2021x Tucker Carlson is like the Joker but racist and more destructive pic.twitter.com/ZkdlYAsmBu — MeidasTouch.com (@MeidasTouch) April 21, 2021
Brooklyn Center Police Use Tear Gas on Crowd 15 Minutes After Its Use Was Banned
On Monday night, the Brooklyn Center City Council passed a resolution banning the use of crowd control tactics like rubber bullets, protester kettling and tear gas. Videos show the police launching canisters of tear gas on protesting crowds on Monday night shortly after the rule was passed. He also implemented a curfew for the counties surrounding Brooklyn Center. The unrest in Brooklyn Center started on Sunday, when about 200 people gathered near the Brooklyn Center Police Department to protest Wright’s death. We need real consequences for these killings.” Potter is a 26-year veteran of the Brooklyn Center Police Department.
We Need to Abolish the Police and End Militarized Occupations of Our Cities
The police murder of George Floyd added jet fuel to a nationwide push to defund the police. KANDACE MONTGOMERY: Yeah, you know, I think it’s really critical that we are lifting up this history and that Attorney General Keith Ellison is also doing so. KANDACE MONTGOMERY: I don’t necessarily think that I have an assessment of what would feel as a just sentence in this moment. And I want to just end this conversation with a reminder of what actually came out from the police department versus what Darnella did. Shortly after Derek Chauvin killed George Floyd, the Minneapolis Police Department issued a press release describing what had happened.
Republicans Have Introduced 81 Anti-Protest Laws in 34 States Just This Year
As protesters have rallied across the U.S. over the past year against police-perpetrated violence and brutality, Republicans in state legislatures have been busy cooking up anti-protest laws. Reporting has found that, just in the 2021 legislative session, Republicans have introduced 81 bills in 34 states aimed at suppressing protests. The bills range from criminalizing protests to making it easier for people to harm protesters without consequences. Other bills seek to take rights away from protesters in ways other than those outlined in the Florida bill. “You have just declared war on the First Amendment in the state of Florida,” said Democratic Florida State Sen. Shevrin Jones after DeSantis signed the anti-protest bill.
Mass Protests Led to Chauvin’s Conviction. Now They’re Being Criminalized.
For the Floyd family, the conviction offered some solace that the courts did not allow Floyd’s life to be taken with impunity. This was the skewed narrative offered in pundit-land, while victims of racist police violence kept dying. The law criminalizes protests that obstruct traffic and makes defacing monuments a felony. It is important that we make these linkages between the Florida law and the skewed framing of the Derek Chauvin trial. So, the Florida law prevents an important mechanism for achieving a modicum of justice, which is the right of citizens and residents to protest.
Opinion : Tucker Carlson despises the Derek Chauvin verdict
“The jury in the Derek Chauvin trial came to a unanimous and unequivocal verdict this afternoon: Please don’t hurt us,” said the host on Tuesday evening. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementThe more Carlson strained to provide an alternative take on the Chauvin verdict, the more he stumbled. The host’s reaction to the verdict was predictable, given how Carlson covered the Floyd murder last year. That’s because the truth of the Floyd murder threatens the fragile white-grievance ecosystem that Carlson has fashioned on Fox News’s airwaves. The Chauvin jury repudiated that nonsense; no wonder Carlson doesn’t want to talk about it.
‘Let them go with it’: Teachers lead talks on Floyd case
“I kind of just let them go with it,” said Garcia-Allen, a career and technology teacher. In the moment and the immediate aftermath of the verdict, some have looked to challenge students’ thinking or incorporate the trial into their curriculum. The school’s social services team provided a script for teachers who felt like they needed something to help guide conversations. Some teachers of younger students chose not to bring up the verdict at all. While she had engaged her students on the Capitol riot in January , she couldn’t find any other teachers at her school who did.
Social justice donations soared in the months after George Floyd’s murder, but then fell — what happened?
The $166 million in donations to social-justice and racial-equity causes represented more than half (51%) of donations that month — more than 15 times the $10 million donated the previous month, according to Benevity’s report. Corporate tech leaders like Apple AAPL, +0.29% CEO Tim Cook and Google GOOG, -0.01% CEO Sundar Pichai also announced their companies would match employee donations. (For more on how to make a difference with donations to racial-equity causes, check out MarketWatch’s guide here.) The Benevity report highlighted plenty of positive trends too. Some 51% of all donations went to nonprofits working to advance racial justice and equity, including the NAACP and the Equal Justice Initiative, according to Benevity.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: 'We can't stop here'
But he declared that "it's not enough.”Biden spoke from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here," Biden declared. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki repeatedly refused to explain Biden’s comments, doing nothing to dispel the impression that he thought Chauvin should be found guilty. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
How the GOP is creating harsher penalties for protesters
AdvertisementThe measures are part of a wave of new anti-protest legislation, sponsored and supported by Republicans, in the 11 months since Black Lives Matter protests swept the country following the death of George Floyd. The Florida law imposes harsher penalties for existing public disorder crimes, turning misdemeanor offenses into felonies, creating new felony offenses, and preventing defendants from being released on bail until they have appeared before a judge. A survey conducted in January by Ryan D. Tyson, a Republican pollster, found broad support in the state for harsher penalties against protesters “who damage personal and business property or assault law enforcement.”AdvertisementBut the law goes further. That was evidence, he said, that bills aimed at punishing protesters were disproportionately targeting people of color. In June, a pickup truck carrying a horse trailer drove through a crowd of Black Lives Matter protesters on a Tulsa freeway, injuring several people and leaving one paralyzed.
Legislative task force on racial disparities issues recommendations for policing
A spokeswoman said the task force will continue to work on the definition of excessive force. The proposal is one of 18 recommendations on policing released by Assembly Speaker Robin Vos's bipartisan task force created to address racial disparities in Wisconsin. "Devastating instances of police violence highlighted the need to reform our policing system," task force co-chairwoman Rep. Shelia Stubbs, D- Madison, said in a statement. However, I will not support anything that jeopardizes public safety or the safety of our law enforcement officers," Wanggaard said. Among the panel's other recommendations are:Creating new protections for any law enforcement officers who quickly report observing another officer using excessive force.
Floyd verdict sparks hope, inspiration for activists abroad
But the fight is far from over, activists, victims’ families and others in Europe, South Africa and elsewhere said Wednesday. Assa Traore led a massive Black Lives Matter protest in Paris following Floyd’s death last May. In France, the first class action lawsuit was filed in January to denounce, and address, alleged “systemic racism” within the police force. The French justice system is achingly slow, and Traore praised the speedy trial of Chauvin and the quick verdict. In Britain, Wheatle and Lawrence both said they felt encouraged that the Black Lives Matter movement and Tuesday’s verdict will help effect change.
Police release more graphic bodycam video and 911 calls in fatal- cop shooting of Ma'khia Bryant
Columbus police on Wednesday released additional body camera video showing 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant lunging at another young woman with a knife before she is fatally shot by a police officer. Police released three body camera recordings, along with two 911 calls reporting the disturbance that ultimately led to the shooting. One of them, Bryant, is seen in the video swinging a knife at a young woman in shorts, who falls to the ground. A slowed-down version of the video shows Bryant then turning her attention toward another woman in a neon tracksuit and pinning her against a parked car. 'This afternoon a young woman tragically lost her life.
Opinion : The central challenge in combating white supremacist violence remains
Today’s white supremacist movement is rooted in the “white genocide” conspiracy theory, which warns that the “white race” is endangered by a changing demographic landscape caused by immigration and interracial relationships. Propaganda that turns every racial incident into another tale of White victimhood fuels white supremacists, including those who resort to violence. Among its recommendations, the CAP-McCain Institute report zeroes in on strategies to address white supremacists’ infiltration of law enforcement and the military. Indeed, far too many law enforcement officials participated in the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol. The executive branch should establish clear policy guidance defining and outlining white supremacist activities in which federal employees and contractors may not participate: This should include, at a minimum, planning, participating in, and advocating for white supremacist violence.
Leo Terrell: People Upset With The Chauvin Verdict “Believe In Chaos”
On Fox Across America with Jimmy Failla, civil right attorney and Fox News contributor Leo Terrell explained why the extreme left and Democratic politicians still had negative things to saw about the criminal justice system even after the Derek Chauvin verdict. “There are people who were upset with the verdict because they want chaos. And we have Maxine Waters out there, she hasn’t passed any legislation, but the race card gets her attention. And no matter how many reforms, it’s not going to satisfy them because they believe in chaos. And that’s why they go out there and have the audacity to say systemic racism, systemic racism, institutionalized racism.
Divided Senate narrowly confirms Vanita Gupta for No. 3 spot at Justice Department
The Senate narrowly approved the nomination of Vanita Gupta as associate attorney general on Wednesday, despite widespread GOP concern that she was unfit for the No. Alaska GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski was the only Republican to join with all Democrats to support Gupta's confirmation. BIDEN DOJ NOMINEE VANITA GUPTA EXPRESSES 'REGRET' OVER ANTI-GOP REMARKS: 'I APOLOGIZE'Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, accused Gupta on Wednesday of lying to the Senate about her past positions and her "radical record." VANITA GUPTA COULD BE BIDEN'S 'MOST DANGEROUS' DOJ PICK, GOP SENATOR ARGUES, WHILE DEM LEADER DECRIES 'SMEARS'As far as her stance on law enforcement, she denied supporting the defund movement. "Virtually every major law enforcement group supports Vanita Gupta," Durbin said Wednesday.
Taking a knee, raising a fist to be punished at Tokyo Games-IOC
The Olympic rings are pictured in front of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) headquarters during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Lausanne, Switzerland, February 24, 2021. REUTERS/Denis?BalibouseTaking a knee during the Tokyo Olympics or lifting a fist in support of racial equality will be punished as the International Olympic Committee on Wednesday maintained its ban on athletes' protests inside stadiums, at ceremonies and on podiums. When asked, however, if athletes would be punished in Tokyo for making political statements such as taking a knee on the podium in support of racial equality, Coventry said: "Yes that is correct." Coventry said some 70% of those athletes did not want protests on podiums, ceremonies and fields of play. The Tokyo Olympics, delayed by a year due to the pandemic, kick off on July 23.
Newsmax host claims Derek Chauvin was ‘sacrificed to the mob’ as right-wing outlets accused of racism
Newsmax host Robert Schmitt on Tuesday (Newsmax/@JasonSCampbell)Newsmax host Robert Schmitt has been accused of racism for saying Derek Chauvin was a “sacrifice to the mob” after the former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of murdering George Floyd. Mr Schmitt told viewers: "They say justice is blind. If we acquit this guy, this city is going to burn to the ground,” said Mr Schmitt. And that's exactly what I think happened today," Mr Schmitt added. Not under any circumstances, not for any reason,” in remarks similar to Mr Schmitt’s.
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis Signs Anti-Protest Bill Into Law
Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, said in a statement: “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America. He faces up to 40 years in prison but is likely to receive a shorter sentence, according to legal guidelines. “I would not call today’s verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration, but it is accountability which is the first step towards justice,” he said. Chauvin is expected to appeal, although he will face an uphill struggle to get the verdicts overturned, given that murder convictions are overwhelmingly upheld. The judge, Peter Cahill, refused to motion but criticised Waters and said she may have provided grounds for appeal.
Mark McCloskey, gun-toting St. Louis lawyer, considering Senate bid
Mark McCloskey — the gun-toting St. Louis attorney who drew headlines last year for brandishing an assault rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters — says he’s looking at running for Missouri’s open Senate seat. McCloskey, a wealthy personal-injury lawyer, said that he had no timeline for making a decision about whether to enter the race for the seat from which Republican Sen. Roy Blunt is retiring. Eric Greitens and state Attorney General Eric Schmitt, both of whom have announced their candidacies. In a pre-recorded, four-minute video, the couple warned that liberals wanted to “demolish” suburban areas and take away gun rights. The list of Democratic contenders includes former state Sen. Scott Sifton and attorney Lucas Kunce.
Bernie Goldberg Trashes HBO’s Real Sports With Bill O’Reilly
After quietly departing HBO’s Real Sports earlier this year, longtime reporter Bernard Goldberg joined Bill O’Reilly to explain his unceremonious decision to leave a show he now says is driven by “cowardice.” Goldberg worked on the show for more than two decades. “You are looking at diversity on the show, I literally am diversity,” the 75-year-old Goldberg told O’Reilly, citing his political differences from the other Real Sports correspondents. Goldberg’s conservative politics didn’t mesh with the show’s direction and left-leaning correspondents. After the segment on transgender athletes was pulled, Goldberg — a frequent contributor — was benched for the next three episodes of the monthly series, according to Awful Announcing’s Ben Koo. But that fear of mixing sports and politics didn’t stop him from wanting to interject more conservative viewpoints.
Newsmax host claims Derek Chauvin was ‘sacrificed to the mob’ as right-wing outlets accused of racism
Newsmax host Robert Schmitt has been accused of racism for saying Derek Chauvin was a “sacrifice to the mob” after the former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of murdering George Floyd. Mr Schmitt told viewers: "They say justice is blind. If we acquit this guy, this city is going to burn to the ground,” said Mr Schmitt. And that's exactly what I think happened today," Mr Schmitt added. Not under any circumstances, not for any reason,” in remarks similar to Mr Schmitt’s.
Democratic senator introduces bill to ban gun silencers
Sen. Bob Menendez Robert (Bob) MenendezBiden rebuffs Democrats, keeps refugee admissions at 15,000 Bottom line The Memo: Biden's five biggest foreign policy challenges MORE (D-N.J.) on Monday introduced a bill to outlaw gun suppressors, also known as silencers. The Help Empower Americans to Respond Act would ban the importation, sale, manufacture, transfer or possession of suppressors, according to a statement from Menendez's office. It was introduced in response to a mass shooting in Virginia Beach, Va., in which a gun suppressor was used. In an interview with "Good Morning Britain" earlier this month, the president said he doesn't like gun suppressors and would "think about" banning them. Twelve people were killed and four were injured in a shooting last month in Virginia Beach.
Golden Globes group ousts ex-HFPA head Phil Berk over BLM email
Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement” and described Cullors as a “self-proclaimed trained Marxist,” according to a report from the Los Angeles Times. The email was sent to HFPA members, staff and the group’s general counsel and chief operating officer. At the time, the group had 87 members who are journalists, but none are Black, the Times reported. The organization has said that an “action plan” was under development to admit Black members.
Community questions use of lethal force in police shooting of Black teen in Columbus
The officer who shot and killed the teen was not identified, although they would be taken off patrol, Woods added. Advertisement“We know, based on this footage, the officer took action to protect another young girl in our community,” he said. AdvertisementVideo taken at the scene by a neighbor shortly after the shooting shows two police officers kneeling over the girl. Taynor, a community activist, noted that just months earlier, police in Columbus had fatally shot Casey Goodson Jr., a 23-year-old Black man who had been entering his residence. “Why is lethal force is the only measure they seem to have with us?” he asked.
Biden DOJ nominee Vanita Gupta’s committee vote ends in tie after heated Senate meeting
The Senate Judiciary Committee was split evenly over President Biden's nomination of Vanita Gupta to be associate attorney general, the third-highest position in the Department of Justice. Cotton was one of many Republicans who delivered speeches illustrating why they were against Gupta's nomination. Durbin staunchly supported Gupta's nomination, blasting Republicans for opposing her – particularly on the issue of police. Following that motion, the full Senate would hold a final vote on Gupta's nomination. In contrast to Gupta's nomination, there was zero controversy over Biden's nomination of Lisa Monaco to be deputy attorney general.
How America's CEOs reacted to the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
"Today's verdict was just," Apple CEO Tim Cook tweeted . and many others in Corporate America responded to George Floyd's death at the hands of police nearly a year ago with calls for action to fight racism at every level, including in their own offices. Chauvin was found guilty Tuesday on three charges, including second-degree unintentional murder. "Finding one officer guilty does not exonerate a legal system that has perpetually brutalized Black and Brown communities," the ice cream maker tweeted. People raise their fists and hold a portrait of George Floyd during a rally following the guilty verdict the trial of Derek Chauvin on April 20, 2021, in Atlanta.
Derek Chauvin conviction on Clippers’ and Trail Blazers’ minds Tuesday night
Describing progress and pain, the Clippers and Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday reacted to the guilty verdict of Derek Chauvin with “mixed emotions,” as Los Angeles center DeMarcus Cousins said, after the Clippers’ 113-112 victory. “They made the right decision,” Clippers star Paul George said, minutes after scoring 33 points. Hopefully it’s a situation that corrects itself, and it sucks because there was another shooting today in Ohio with a young teenage girl. “But I think there is a lot of change that needs to be done. In terms of law enforcement, I think the George Floyd bill should be passed.
Columbus, Ohio police release body cam footage after fatally shooting Ma’Khia Bryant, 16
In an unprecedented move, Columbus, Ohio police showed body camera footage of the shooting of a 16-year-old girl by a Columbus police officer just hours after the incident on the Southeast Side. “It’s a tragic day in the city of Columbus. “We felt transparency in sharing this footage, as incomplete as it is at this time” was critical. “In any way you look at this, it’s a tragedy.”Hazel Bryant told The Dispatch that she is the aunt of Ma’Khia Bryant. Protesters with Black Lives Matter signs, megaphones and a loudspeaker joined the crowd gathered behind crime scene tape about a half-block away from the shooting scene.
Justice department to investigate Minneapolis policing practices
The US justice department announced on Wednesday that it is launching a sweeping investigation into policing practices in Minneapolis, less than a day after a white former officer was convicted of murdering George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, there. “The justice department has opened a civil investigation to determine whether the Minneapolis police department has engaged in a pattern and practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing,” Garland said. The justice department was already investigating whether Chauvin and the three other officers involved in Floyd’s death violated his civil rights. The Minneapolis police department is also being investigated by the Minnesota department of human rights, which is looking into the department’s policies and practices over the last decade to see if it engaged in systemic discriminatory practices. Minneapolis’s mayor, Jacob Frey, said city officials “welcome the investigation as an opportunity to continue working toward deep change and accountability in the Minneapolis police department”.
George Floyd: What was the reaction like to Chauvin's guilty verdict?
Many activists and politicians spoke out with relief after former police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of killing George Floyd during an arrest in May 2020. Amanda Gorman, known for her poetry reading at the 2021 US presidential inauguration of Joe Biden, said however that "victory would be George Floyd being alive". It was a sentiment echoed by US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi who tweeted: "George Floyd should be alive today. "This verdict is the work of George Floyd's family. London Mayor Sadiq Kahn said: "By itself – this guilty verdict won't heal the pain of the loss felt by George Floyd’s loved ones, and by people across the globe.
Psaki responds to fatal cop shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant
White House press secretary Jen Psaki said that the fatal cop shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant shows police violence 'disproportionately impacts black and Latino people' during Wednesday's press briefing. 'The killing of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant by the Columbus police is tragic,' the White House press secretary said. Psaki's response to the Columbus shooting was similar to when DailyMail.com asked her Friday about the killing of Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old black boy in Chicago. Psaki also said the White House was also waiting to see how the independent investigation of Toledo's shooting would play out. Earlier Wednesday, the Columbus police department released bodycam footage showing an officer shooting Bryant.
Psaki responds to fatal cop shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant
White House press secretary Jen Psaki said that the fatal cop shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant shows police violence 'disproportionately impacts black and Latino people' during Wednesday's press briefing. 'The killing of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant by the Columbus police is tragic,' the White House press secretary said. Psaki's response to the Columbus shooting was similar to when DailyMail.com asked her Friday about the killing of Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old black boy in Chicago. Psaki also said the White House was also waiting to see how the independent investigation of Toledo's shooting would play out. Earlier Wednesday, the Columbus police department released bodycam footage showing an officer shooting Bryant.
Marjorie Taylor Greene under fire for calling BLM greatest terrorist risk to US
Twitter users responded in fury, with many bringing attention to the fact that Ms Greene supported Donald Trump’s baseless claims of election fraud before crowds — alleged white domestic terrorists among them — stormed the US Capitol in January. Activist and campaigner Rosanna Arquette wrote that the Georgia congresswoman and white supremacists were “the strongest terrorist threat in America”. Star Trek actor George Takei added: “Marjorie Greene says BLM is the biggest terror threat to the nation. NBC News correspondent Garrett Haake wrote: “This isn’t true.”“I spent four hours at BLM plaza in DC tonight, talking to the folks who wanted to come out near the White House on an historic night,” wrote Mr Haake. It was a bit windy though.”“That is a lie,” wrote another Twitter user.
Pelosi floats new proposal for bipartisan Jan. 6 commission
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is renewing her push for a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, floating a new proposal to Republicans that would evenly split the panel’s membership between the two parties. Pelosi and House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy haven’t even been able to agree on whether the Republicans have been sent the proposal. Pelosi said in her letter Friday that “ we have once again sent a proposal for such a Commission to the Republicans,” but a spokesman for McCarthy said Wednesday that neither the Republican leader nor his staff have received Pelosi’s latest proposal. Pelosi has said repeatedly that she will not concede to the Republican demands on the scope. “It’s not about examining Black Lives Matter,” Pelosi said last week.
Ohio lawmakers call for more training, more transparency for police
In the wake of protests over police shootings, Ohio lawmakers are ready to take another run at requiring more annual training and establishing a licensing board for the state's 34,000 officers. Plummer, the former Montgomery County sheriff, said the legislation will call for a professional licensing board, a statewide database of officer discipline files and additional annual training mandates. Training saves lives. While anyone was welcome to join discussions, representatives from civil rights groups such as the Ohio Civil Rights Commission, Ohio Conference of Units of the NAACP and Black Lives Matters have not participated, the two said. Tom Roberts, a former lawmaker who is president the NAACP units in Ohio, said the civil rights group supports the reform concepts and will testify on the bill.
Ohio county where girl, 16, was killed is state’s deadliest for police shootings
Tuesday’s shooting sparked protests at the scene of the shooting in Franklin county, which researchers say is the most deadly county in the state for police shootings. Franklin county children’s services, who identified Ma’Khia to the media, said the 16-year-old was in foster care. About 20% of Ohio’s Black population live in Franklin county, but the area accounted for 33% of the state’s police fatalities involving Black victims. Hill, a Black man, was shot and killed in Franklin county by another Columbus police officer in December. Less than three weeks before Hill was killed, a Franklin county sheriff’s deputy fatally shot 23-year-old Casey Goodson Jr, a Black man, in Columbus.
White lecturer tells students she’s ‘sick’ of talking about Black Lives Matter
A white lecturer at a college in upstate New York is under probe by the school — because she told students she was “sick” of talking about the Black Lives Matter movement. “So am I sick about talking about Black Lives Matter. The remark to a class of predominantly black students was “insensitive” and came as an example of an opinion that would lead Cope to get “canceled,” Morehead said. “In the broader context of it, it’s pretty clear that she’s supportive of Black Lives Matter,” FIRE attorney Adam Steinbaugh told the Buffalo News. “Let me be absolutely clear — Black Lives Matter at Buffalo State College,” the statement read.
‘A kaleidoscope of raw emotions’: How artists are responding to the Derek Chauvin verdict
Still no words, really — just a kaleidoscope of raw emotions running the gamut.”Brandon-Croft’s poignant comic was among the images that artists were creating and adapting on deadline. Story continues below advertisementAn hour before the verdict, Vancouver-based cartoonist Pia Guerra decided she would render a cartoon of Chauvin that she believed would stand regardless of the outcome. Either way, it would have been a glaring spotlight, and that’s where the drawing came from.”AdvertisementShe drew Chauvin backdropped by his shadow, which was rendered as a Klansman holding a noose. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisement“Since they hadn’t deliberated very long, I figured it was probably a guilty verdict,” says the political cartoonist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Story continues below advertisement“I could not believe,” he says, “that 12 jurors could have possibly come to any other conclusion.”
Marjorie Taylor Greene’s imaginary D.C. sounds like a scary place, which is the point
Official D.C. is loathed by most of America for being home to the non-D.C. people who come and posture on Capitol Hill. Unofficial D.C. is largely ignored, except when it can be used as a stereotype of a heavily Democratic urban area. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) understands the opportunity that this affords. Greene was trying to argue that D.C. was some bizarro world of leftism where the government was forcing every business to close. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementMaybe that deceptive tweet about the gym was somehow born of her being new to the area.
Opinion : The Chauvin verdict opens up a world of possibilities. Will we squander them?
Other reform ideas include a stricter national use-of-force standard, enforced with federal funding mechanisms, and the designation of choke holds as federal civil rights violations. Story continues below advertisement“The brutal behavior of the police shocked the conscience of the country,” Mann told me. Soon after Birmingham, of course, came the Civil Rights Act, Lyndon B. Johnson’s “We shall overcome” speech and the Voting Rights Act. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisement“People understandably had a sense that the road was flat and smooth going forward,” Mann told me. “People do get their hopes up at moments like this, but it’s front-page news because it’s so unusual,” Mann told me.
Faith leaders hope Chauvin verdict lifts racial justice work
Faith leaders in Minnesota and across the United States expressed hope that their advocacy work for racial justice will gain momentum from the guilty verdict rendered against Derek Chauvin, the former police officer convicted of killing George Floyd. “It’s very encouraging for our overall work around racial justice to see the system, in this case, work,” said the Rev. “I’m happy about what has taken place and the verdict — but I know there’s tons of work that needs to be done. W. Seth Martin, the Black pastor of Brook Community Church in Minneapolis, said the verdict would reinforce the solidarity of his multiracial congregation. Dr. William J. Barber II, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign and a prominent racial justice advocate, agreed with others that there is still work to be done.
Charlotte area leaders react: ‘Lady Justice has shown up’ with Chauvin guilty verdict
“We’ve been screaming, we’ve been crying, we’ve been protesting, we’ve been laying in the street... and finally something is happening.”Kristie Puckett-Williams of the American Civil Liberties Union felt conflicted. “We can finally say George Floyd’s name and it won’t be synonymous with grief and deep despair and loss but also will be synonymous with accountability. But relief that, for now, we don’t have to go through the pain and collective trauma that would have occurred from hearing a not guilty verdict,” he said. City, county leaders reactCharlotte Mayor Vi Lyles said Floyd’s death and subsequent trial “should give us pause.”“Another Black man lost his life. Mecklenburg County District Attorney Spencer Merriweather called the Chauvin verdict “a seminal moment in a courtroom” that could restore trust in the criminal justice system.
Opinion: Nancy Pelosi’s gratitude, and the problem with Black martyrdom
“Thank you, George Floyd, for sacrificing your life for justice,” she said. AdvertisementHer phrasing sat somewhere between awkward and offensive, but it’s clear that Pelosi did not mean to thank George Floyd for being murdered. Still — inadvertently — she underscored the fact that Black martyrdom has been an all-too-real phenomenon throughout America’s troubled history. The roster of Black martyrdom to the cause of civil rights and racial equality — just since the 1950s — is staggering: Emmett Till. Yes, we must remember our martyrs, but the only true path forward is to achieve justice — the justice that our martyrs were denied.
Feldman: It’s too soon to call the Derek Chauvin verdict a turning point
The jury that convicted Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd got it right. The temptation to treat a jury verdict in a big case as symbolic stems, I think, from our powerful human tendency to use individual stories as metaphors in order to make sense of the world around us. The jury was not asked to determine that Chauvin murdered Floyd because of racism, whether conscious or unconscious. The upshot is that we cannot know if the guilty verdict for the murder of George Floyd signifies an inflection point in the trajectory of racial justice. A jury verdict can send a message, or try to do so, but a jury has no power to fundamentally change the system.
Be MKE: Foxconn's new deal, beer gardens opening and reacting to the Derek Chauvin verdict
The big deals this week: Foxconn has a new deal, new beer gardens and Milwaukee reacts to the Derek Chauvin verdict. Let's talk businessFoxconn and the state of Wisconsin have a new deal. Maranta Plant Shop opened last week after operating as an online shop for the last six months. The owners believe it's the first and only Black- and brown-owned plant shop in Milwaukee. Gonna be honest, I just walk into a plant shop and ask "what can't I kill?"
It's too soon to call the Derek Chauvin verdict a turning point
The jury that convicted Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd got it right. The temptation to treat a jury verdict in a big case as symbolic stems, I think, from our powerful human tendency to use individual stories as metaphors in order to make sense of the world around us. The jury was not asked to determine that Chauvin murdered Floyd because of racism, whether conscious or unconscious. The upshot is that we cannot know if the guilty verdict for the murder of George Floyd signifies an inflection point in the trajectory of racial justice. A jury verdict can send a message, or try to do so, but a jury has no power to fundamentally change the system.
Stephen Colbert on Derek Chauvin guilty verdict: ‘More work to be done’
“After 10 hours of deliberation, a jury in Minneapolis decided that it’s illegal for the police to murder people, that Black Lives Matter,” Colbert said. “But at least in this case, this man faces accountability.”Still, “justice is a far more difficult goal,” the Late Show host continued. There is more work to be done.”Jimmy KimmelIn Los Angeles, Jimmy Kimmel also started his monologue with a mention of Derek Chauvin’s landmark guilty verdict. Seth MeyersLate Night taped before the announcement of the Chauvin verdict, “so if it seems conspicuous in its absence, that is the reason why”, Seth Meyers said. And “according to polls, Americans are more interested in trying edibles than any other type of cannabis product,” Meyers explained.
Teen who filmed George Floyd arrest celebrates verdict, shares guilt she couldn’t save him
“This last hour my heart was beating so fast, I was so anxious, anxiety bussing through the roof.”The 17-year-old, who also testified during the trial, said: “George Floyd we did it!! The US president, Joe Biden, hailed her actions following the verdict, calling her a "brave young woman with a smartphone camera”. "Without her bravery that prioritized George Floyd’s humanity over her own safety, this verdict may not have been possible," New York City mayoral candidate, Ray McGuire, said. "It’s been nights I stayed up apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting and not saving his life, but it’s not what I should have done. Chauvin, who showed no emotion as the verdict was read, was handcuffed and taken into custody as he awaits sentencing.
Tucker Carlson Goes Into 'Meltdown' Mode While Covering Derek Chauvin Conviction
Fox News host Tucker Carlson behaved strangely on the air Tuesday night. At that point, Carlson interrupted and spoke over Gavin, saying, ”Yeah. On Monday, Carlson accused the media of “lynching” Chauvin and contended that most Americans “still cannot say with any specificity just how” Floyd died. Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds during his arrest, as seen in a video of the incident. On Tuesday, a jury found Chauvin guilty of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter.
Columbus police release bodycam footage; officer on leave: What we know about the fatal shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant
COLUMBUS, Ohio – About 20 minutes before a guilty verdict was announced in the trial of Derek Chauvin, a Columbus police officer fatally shot a teen girl. Columbus police released body camera footage of the shooting of the 16-year-old girl by just hours after the incident on Tuesday afternoon. Franklin County Children's Services identified the girl who was killed as 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant. Protests also quickly formed at the scene of the shooting and the city’s police headquarters. Shortly after the shooting, protesters with "Black Lives Matter" signs, megaphones and a loudspeaker joined the crowd gathered behind crime scene tape about a half-block away from the shooting scene.
BLM protesters scream ‘we don’t want you here’ at diners outside NYC restaurant
“We don’t want your f–ing money! We don’t want your f—ing taqueria, owned by f—ing white men!” he screamed, with the mob repeating each line as caught in video by The Post. In a recent video interview with ChowNow, Nassar explained how all of his staff relied on the restaurant, an 11-year “neighborhood staple,” to survive during the pandemic. “We don’t want you here,” screamed a ringleader standing on a table next to the diners at Maya Taqueria in Prospect Heights. After first saying they didn’t want the “f–ing money,” the protesters quickly switched to wanting diners help it get more cash.
Live updates Biden to tout achievement of 200 million coronavirus shots administered in U.S. by week’s end
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) late Tuesday called the Black Lives Matter Movement “the strongest terrorist threat” in the country, drawing swift condemnations from Democrats. “DC is completely dead tonight,” Greene tweeted. “People stayed in and were scared to go out because of fear of riots. “I’m in DC like @mtgreenee & she is either the most obtuse person elected to Congress or the biggest liar,” he said. “People are out & about on a warm night (so loud by me it’s a bit hard to get to sleep) & there is no more police presence than usual.
Late-night hosts sound off on Derek Chauvin verdict: 'Accountability today is a deterrent for tomorrow'
Following the verdict in the high-profile murder trial of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, late-night hosts took a break from jokes and began their shows by somberly addressing the conviction. SPORTS WORLD REACTS TO DEREK CHAUVIN BEING FOUND GUILTY ON ALL CHARGES IN GEORGE FLOYD DEATH"Just before the taping of our show today, the verdict was announced in the trial of Derek Chauvin. He was found guilty on all three counts in the death of George Floyd. CELEBRITIES REACT TO DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL VERDICT: ‘JUSTICE’Meanwhile, on "The Tonight Show," Jimmy Fallon also took a brief moment to address the verdict before launching into his monologue. He began by highlighting calls for police reform and accountability in America that were sparked by the video involving Chauvin and Floyd.
HFPA member Philip Berk ousted after calling BLM a 'hate movement' in an email
Philip Berk, a former president and longtime member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the organization that governs and votes for the annual Golden Globes, has been ousted from the group's board after sending an email that called Black Lives Matter a "hate movement." The Hollywood Foreign Press Association board said in an email Tuesday that the 88-year-old is no longer a member of the organization. Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The email was sent to HFPA members, staff, and the group’s general counsel and chief operating officer. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPThe organization has said that an "action plan" was under development to admit Black members.
After Chauvin verdict, business leaders speak out saying fight for racial justice must continue
—Statement from Best BuyBusiness Roundtable"Today's verdict confirms that George Floyd was the victim of a senseless crime. Like outraged people everywhere, I had an overwhelming hope that today's verdict would provide real accountability. I can't imagine how difficult these months have been for the family and friends of George Floyd. They are very much in my thoughts, and I hope today's verdict offers some measure of solace. We hope today's verdict is an initial step towards justice and healing.
George Floyd: A mix of 'relief and sadness' as world tunes into Derek Chauvin verdict
LONDON — Millions around the world watched the verdict as Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of causing the death of George Floyd on Tuesday. "It was a mixture of relief and sadness because the guilty verdict isn't justice, justice would be Black lives mattering in America and abroad," she told NBC News. In a more muted tone than last summer, the Chauvin verdict filled newspapers and broadcasts in France, Germany, Japan and elsewhere. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listening to the verdict in his trial in the killing of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, Minn., on Tuesday. AFP - Getty ImagesIn Asia, the Chauvin verdict gave hope to those facing racial discrimination, said Pimsiri Petchnamrob, 36, a human rights activist from Bangkok.
Floyd verdict sparks hope, inspiration for activists abroad
It signaled hope for those seeking racial justice and fighting police brutality on the other side of the Atlantic, where Black Lives Matter has also become a rallying cry. Assa Traore led a massive Black Lives Matter protest that drew tens of thousands onto the streets of Paris following Floyd’s death last May. ADVERTISEMENTMalcolm Baker, a spokesperson for the U.K. chapter of Black Lives Matter, said that while the Chauvin verdict came as a relief and an inspiration for many, Britain still has a lot to do to combat decades of systemic racism against Black people. Floyd’s death emphasizes just how much must still be done “to reverse the tide of systemic racism that permeates the lives of people of African descent,” she said. The French justice system is achingly slow, and Traore praised the speedy trial of Chauvin and the quick verdict.
Officials race to empty reservoir to eliminate "voracious predator"
There are also signs of backlash: Legislation that would reduce voting access, protect the police and effectively criminalize public protests has sprung up in Republican-controlled state legislatures. Floyd’s death, most Americans agreed early last summer, was part of a broader pattern — not an isolated episode. Even as the outcry over Floyd’s death has raised awareness of it, other trends tied to the pandemic have only exacerbated that inequality. White Americans unfamiliar with the concept of structural racism drove books on the topic to the top of bestseller lists. George Floyd’s death created a new energy around making changes, though it’s not clear how lasting they will be,” said Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change.
Ted Cruz says Biden's comments about the Derek Chauvin verdict are 'grounds for a mistrial'
A Republican proposal in Indiana would bar anyone convicted of unlawful assembly from holding state employment, including elected office. The Minneapolis police officer who killed Floyd, Derek Chauvin, was convicted on Tuesday on murder and manslaughter charges, a cathartic end to weeks of tension. The Iowa bills, part of a law enforcement package proposed by Gov. Kim Reynolds, would strip local governments of state funding if cities and counties defund their own law enforcement budgets — something that no Iowa jurisdiction has sought to do. Carroll said the bill was needed to ensure community safety and protect law enforcement personnel.
The lawyer who pointed his gun at Black Lives Matter protesters in St. Louis is considering running for Senate
Mark and Patricia McCloskey brandishing their guns as Black Lives Matter protesters passed through their gated community in St. Louis, Missouri. Daniel Shular/TwitterMark McCloskey and his wife Patricia displayed their guns as BLM protesters passed their house last year. McCloskey told Politico on Tuesday he's considering running for Senate in 2022. The lawyer who pointed his gun at Black Lives Matter protesters as they passed through his St. Louis, Missouri, gated community has said he is considering a run for Senate. The protesters had been trying to march toward the home of Mayor Lyda Krewson of St. Louis.
The Death of George Floyd Reignited a Movement. What Happens Now?
People hug at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, after the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd. Floyd’s death, most Americans agreed early last summer, was part of a broader pattern — not an isolated episode. Even as the outcry over Floyd’s death has raised awareness of it, other trends tied to the pandemic have only exacerbated that inequality. White Americans unfamiliar with the concept of structural racism drove books on the topic to the top of bestseller lists. George Floyd’s death created a new energy around making changes, though it’s not clear how lasting they will be,” said Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
But he declared that “it’s not enough.”Biden spoke Tuesday from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here,” Biden declared. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki repeatedly refused to explain Biden’s comments, doing nothing to dispel the impression that he thought Chauvin should be found guilty. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
Cop Derek Chauvin is taken to prison and placed on suicide watch after being found guilty
'George Floyd!' Moments after the Chauvin verdict was announced news of another police-involved killing of a black American emerged. The View host Goldberg, 65, told her followers: 'Guilty Guilty Guilty... No one wins.. George Floyd is still gone.. and finally someone was responsible... Derek Chauvin.' which contained a call to action for her followers, urging them to help pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. The speaker and other black lawmakers called for police reform, including the passage of The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.
Makiyah Bryant: Protesters gather at Columbus police headquarters after Black teenager fatally shot by officer
Hundreds of protesters marched in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday night after a Black teenage girl was shot and killed by police in the city. Protesters gathered outside of the Columbus police headquarters for hours on Tuesday after 16-year-old Makiyah Bryant was identified by her family as the victim in the police shooting. Following the fatal shooting on Tuesday, hundreds of protesters gathered outside of the Columbus police headquarters, with many pushing past barriers set up to get closer to the building. The crowd chanted “Bryant” as they approached officers outside of the building, while a group of protesters were heard shouting: “She was just a kid,” according to the New York Post. Protesters with Black Lives Matters signs later joined the crowd of onlookers at the scene as the night progressed.
Golden Globes' ex-president is FIRED over email that compared BLM movement to Charles Manson
The saga marks just the latest controversy for the HFPA after it recently came under fire for not having a black member in more than 20 years. NBC had called for the entity to take 'swift action' to reprimand Berk over the email. It then goes on to accuse BLM, the social movement protesting against racist violence against black people, of 'carrying on Manson's work.' Manson formed a cult - the Manson Family - which wanted to start a race war in the 1960s. Dr. Harper has been notified, here, that you are equating the Black Lives Matter moment to the Charles Manson murderous gang.'
Capitol riot suspect caught after facial recognition software found his girlfriend's Instagram
A suspected US Capitol rioter accused of attacking three cops and whose image was circulated on social media with the hashtag #GrayCarharttHat was arrested after the FBI used facial recognition software to find his girlfriend's Instagram. The use of facial recognition technology is considered a sensitive issue in light of concerns raised by civil libertarians that law enforcement officials can abuse the method to violate people’s privacy. In February, Minneapolis’ city council voted to ban its police department from using facial recognition technology. Last summer, as Black Lives Matter protesters took to the streets in the wake of the police-involved death of George Floyd, the usage of face recognition technology spiked. Face recognition technology is also widely deployed by US Customs and Border Protection personnel that man ports of entry across the country.
Girl, 10, who testified at Derek Chauvin's trial says she is 'proud'
@ABC NEWS EXCLUSIVE: 10-year-old eyewitness who testified in Chauvin trial speaks to @RobinRoberts about guilty verdict. https://t.co/cmfiAashSn pic.twitter.com/IbB91hiWIP — Good Morning America (@GMA) April 21, 2021Jedeah is shown arriving at the Cup Foods store in Minneapolis, minutes before Floyd's death on May 25 last year. Each charge required jurors to find that Chauvin's actions were a 'substantial causal factor' in Floyd's death and that his use of force was unreasonable. Third-degree murder - GUILTY Possible sentence: 12.5 to 25 years Third-degree murder required a lower standard of proof than second-degree. My thoughts tonight are with George Floyd's family and friends.'
Columbus police release bodycam footage; officer on leave: What we know about the fatal shooting of Ma'Khia Bryant
COLUMBUS, Ohio – About 20 minutes before a guilty verdict was announced in the trial of Derek Chauvin, a Columbus police officer fatally shot a teen girl. Columbus police released body camera footage of the shooting of the 16-year-old girl by just hours after the incident on Tuesday afternoon. Franklin County Children's Services identified the girl who was killed as 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant. Protests also quickly formed at the scene of the shooting and the city’s police headquarters. Shortly after the shooting, protesters with "Black Lives Matter" signs, megaphones and a loudspeaker joined the crowd gathered behind crime scene tape about a half-block away from the shooting scene.
HFPA removes former president from board after he sent an email calling Black Lives Matter a 'hate movement'
Associated PressLOS ANGELES — A former president of the organization that hosts the Golden Globes has been dropped from the group's board after sending an email that called Black Lives Matter a "hate movement." Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a "racist hate movement" and described Cullors as a "self-proclaimed trained Marxist," according to a report from the Los Angeles Times. The email was sent to HFPA members, staff and the group's general counsel and chief operating officer. The organization has said that an "action plan" was under development to admit Black members.
Mark McCloskey, gun-toting St. Louis lawyer, reportedly mulls Senate run
Mark McCloskey, who made national headlines with his wife when they pointed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters outside their St. Louis mansion, is reportedly mulling a Senate run in Missouri. McCloskey spoke this weekend at a Jackson County Republican dinner, which also drew former Gov. Armed homeowners Mark and Patricia McCloskey, confront protesters marching to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson’s house in the Central West End of St. Louis on June 28, 2020. Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey draw their firearms at protesters on June 28, 2020. Mark and Patricia McCloskey made a stop at the Luzerne County Republican headquarters during a McCloskey Team Trump bus stop in Kingston, Pennsylvania on Sept. 30, 2020.
‘Today, we are able to breathe again’: Floyd’s family members celebrate verdict, vow to fight on for racial justice
Story continues below advertisementThe Floyd family attorney, Ben Crump, cast the verdict as a critical moment in America’s troubled history of race, policing and criminal justice. In a statement sending support to the Floyd family, Obama stated frankly that the country needed to “come to terms” with the prevalence of racism in its various systems, from policing to the economy. Before the verdict was announced, Floyd’s family members gathered in a hotel conference room in downtown Minneapolis and braced themselves for what was to come. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act has passed the House but remains stalled in the Senate. Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison (D) was among several top officials who acknowledged Floyd’s family in the aftermath of the verdict.
Live updates Biden to tout achievement of 200 million coronavirus shots administered in U.S. by week’s end
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) late Tuesday called the Black Lives Matter Movement “the strongest terrorist threat” in the country, drawing swift condemnations from Democrats. “DC is completely dead tonight,” Greene tweeted. “People stayed in and were scared to go out because of fear of riots. “I’m in DC like @mtgreenee & she is either the most obtuse person elected to Congress or the biggest liar,” he said. “People are out & about on a warm night (so loud by me it’s a bit hard to get to sleep) & there is no more police presence than usual.
Indonesian submarine goes missing north of Bali
The GuardianCongresswoman defiant as Republicans condemn her comments in support of protesters Maxine Waters during a protest in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, over the weekend. “I am not worried that they’re going to continue to distort what I say,” Waters, 82, told the Grio. House Democrats on Tuesday voted down a resolution from the Republican minority leader, Kevin McCarthy, to censure Waters over her comments, just hours before Chauvin was convicted of George Floyd’s murder. If Chauvin was acquitted, she said, “we’ve got to stay on the street, and we’ve got to get more active. “This weekend in Minnesota, Maxine Waters broke the law by violating curfew and then incited violence,” McCarthy tweeted.
How the GOP Is Creating Harsher Penalties for Protesters
Still, as they embraced the bill that DeSantis signed into law, Republican leaders expressed scorn for cities that trim police budgets and tolerate protesters who disrupt business and traffic. “We were not going to allow Florida to become Portland.”The Florida law imposes harsher penalties for existing public disorder crimes, turning misdemeanor offenses into felonies, creating new felony offenses and preventing defendants from being released on bail until they have appeared before a judge. That was evidence, he said, that bills aimed at punishing protesters were disproportionately targeting people of color. The Iowa bills, part of a law enforcement package proposed by Gov. Carroll said the bill was needed to ensure community safety and protect law enforcement personnel.
The subversive little hot sauce that took on a life of its own
When life gave chef Spencer Bezaire lemons and a shutdown, he made citrusy hot sauce. Like thousands of other restaurateurs across Los Angeles, Bezaire and his wife, Sabrina, suddenly lost their income and what felt like their future. “It was like a rent party but in hot sauce form. “I like spicy food but I don’t like to overdo it, and I’m not necessarily a hot sauce fanatic, either. Eventually, Bezaire says, he’d like to hire help just for the hot sauce, freeing up his days off — which he often spends boiling pots of peppers.
'Good Trouble' makes politics even sexier than 'Bridgerton'
While everyone is losing precious hours of their life worrying about “Bridgerton’s” casting or “Euphoria’s” return, “Good Trouble” has quietly become the most interesting drama of the bunch. Like many shows depicting this demographic, “Good Trouble” involves a lot of sex, romance and interpersonal drama, but it also takes work-life very seriously. Like many series, “Good Trouble” shut down production in spring 2020. And “Good Trouble” didn’t need COVID to reflect the many facets of the last year. The beauty of “Good Trouble” is that, like all good television, it is exquisitely character-driven.
'I'm in tears': Mariah Carey, Oprah, more stars react to Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
Celebrities are reacting to the verdict in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who was found guilty Tuesday on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May. "today justice"Billie Eilish, Taylor Swift, Oprah, more celebrities react to the death of George Floyd: 'We must act'"THANK GOD," Cher tweeted. "Justice," wrote George Takei. "THANK GOD!!" George Floyd: Rapper Killer Mike urges people to organize, Nick Cannon joins in MinneapolisContributing: Grace Hauck, N'dea Yancey-Bragg, Tami Abdollah, Kevin McCoy, Eric Ferkenhoff
Jane Austen’s tea drinking not under ‘interrogation’, says museum
Staff at the museum Jane Austen’s House are reassuring fans of the Pride and Prejudice author that they have never and will never “interrogate Jane Austen, her characters or her readers for drinking tea”. The museum issued the statement on Tuesday, after the Telegraph reported that Austen’s tea drinking would “face ‘historical interrogation’” by the museum over the author’s family’s links to slavery. The paper quoted museum director Lizzie Dunford, who said that, as Austen’s family were purchasers of tea, sugar and cotton, “they were consumers of the products of the [slave] trade”. The museum in Chawton, Hampshire, has hit back at the coverage, saying that its plans have been “misrepresented”. Jane Austen’s House in Chawton, Hampshire.
Mark McCloskey, gun-toting St. Louis lawyer, considering Senate bid
Mark McCloskey — the gun-toting St. Louis attorney who drew headlines last year for brandishing an assault rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters — says he’s looking at running for Missouri’s open Senate seat. AdvertisementMcCloskey, a wealthy personal-injury lawyer, said that he had no timeline for making a decision about whether to enter the race for the seat from which Republican Sen. Roy Blunt is retiring. Eric Greitens and state Attorney General Eric Schmitt, both of whom have announced their candidacies. In a pre-recorded, four-minute video, the couple warned that liberals wanted to “demolish” suburban areas and take away gun rights. The list of Democratic contenders includes former state Sen. Scott Sifton and attorney Lucas Kunce.
Arizona governor declares state of emergency, sends National Guard troops to border
The move makes Arizona the first state to declare an emergency as the Biden administration seeks to control the influx of migrants at the border. ADVERTISEMENT“I said last month that the Biden administration is totally divorced from reality,” Ducey said. Arizona isn’t the first state to send the National Guard to the border. Greg Abbott (R) sent troops to the border in early March, though he didn’t declare a state of emergency. Biden ended that emergency order but has kept the Guard presence at the border.
The World Reacts To Derek Chauvin’s Conviction For The Murder Of George Floyd
On 20 April at a courthouse in Minneapolis, the three-week trial of ex-cop Derek Chauvin for the killing of George Floyd finally reached its conclusion, with the jury convicting Chauvin on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. The verdict does not resolve the systemic racism and police brutality that the killing highlighted, but given the global attention and groundswell of support behind Floyd and his family, it marked a step forward in holding its perpetrators to account. As many around the world were quick to note, this is just the beginning. Here, find the responses from political leaders, public figures, and activists from across the globe after the historic verdict was reached. This article was originally published on Vogue.com.
The World Reacts to Derek Chauvin’s Conviction for the Murder of George Floyd
Earlier this afternoon at a courthouse in Minneapolis, the three-week trial of ex-cop Derek Chauvin for the killing of George Floyd finally reached its conclusion, with the jury convicting Chauvin on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. The verdict does not resolve the systemic racism and police brutality that the killing highlighted, but given the global attention and groundswell of support behind Floyd and his family, it marked a step forward in holding its perpetrators to account. As well as sharing their hopes for how this verdict may help advance the Black Lives Matter movement and anti-racism initiatives more broadly, many also took the opportunity to send their condolences to Floyd’s family, for whom this verdict comes as a necessary move towards closure following his death almost a year ago. As many around the world were quick to note, this is just the beginning. Here, find the responses from political leaders, public figures, and activists from across the globe after today’s historic verdict was reached.
Derek Chauvin found guilty for the murder of George Floyd
Chauvin appeared dismayed as Judge Peter Cahill read the jury’s verdict. According to The New York Times, he faces up to 40 years in prison for the second-degree murder charge, 25 years for the third-degree murder charge, and 10 years for the second-degree manslaughter charge. Chauvin was led out of the courtroom in handcuffs shortly after the verdict was read. Floyd died in police custody last summer after Chauvin kneeled on his neck for more than nine minutes. Social media on Tuesday was flooded with an emotional mix of reactions, with many expressing relief for the verdict but also pointing out that it won’t bring Floyd back.
‘Last Straw’: Americans confront racism, violence in Chauvin trial
The audience for the trial was hard to measure, but likely vast because of the many streaming services that carried it live. Civil rights historian Clayborne Carson, director of the Martin Luther King Jr. Institute at Stanford University, was beaten by baton-wielding police during 1960s civil rights protests. Issues of racism and police brutality "didn't just arise when George Floyd took his last breath," said Councilwoman Andrea Jenkins who represents Minneapolis's Ward 8, which includes the intersection where Floyd was killed. YEARS OF UPHEAVALFor Mark Bray, a human rights historian and author, the current era of social and political upheaval started years before the pandemic and Floyd's death. But the protests over Floyd's death stretched beyond people who might embrace the term radical; people who may not normally demonstrate turned out in massive protests around the world.
The CBC reacts to Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict
The CBC reacts to Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict Presented byWith Nicholas Wu and Andrew Desiderio. THE VERDICT: News of the jury finding Derek Chauvin guilty on three counts ushered in an incredibly emotional moment at the Capitol yesterday. The Blue Dogs had their own White House meeting on Tuesday, also with Klain, Ricchetti, and Terrell. The briefings, given to both House members and senators, didn’t appear to change anyone’s mind, but we wanted to highlight this interesting reaction from Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.). Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.), and others will hold a press conference ahead of the House vote on the D.C.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
But he declared that “it’s not enough.”Biden spoke Tuesday from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here,” Biden declared. The verdict — and the aftermath — will be a continuing test for Biden. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
Sunny Hostin emotionally reacts to Derek Chauvin conviction on-air: 'This is what justice finally looks like'
ABC's Sunny Hostin delivered one of the more powerful reactions on live television following news of Derek Chauvin's conviction in the murder of George Floyd. On Tuesday, Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter stemming from Floyd's death on May 25, 2020. "The View" star Sunny Hostin delivers powerful speech about what Derek Chauvin's conviction means for the Black community. Story continuesThis content is not available due to your privacy preferences. This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Derek Chauvin Found Guilty On All Charges In George Floyd's Death
“George Floyd mattered,” Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said during a press conference after the verdict was announced. “On May 25, 2020, George Floyd died facedown on the pavement right on 38th and Chicago in Minneapolis,” prosecutor Steve Schleicher said in his closing arguments. During this time, George Floyd struggled, desperate to breathe, to make enough room in his chest to breathe. He was trapped.”“Facing George Floyd that day did not require one ounce of courage, and none was shown on that day,” he told the jury. This was murder.”A woman pays respect to a mural of George Floyd by the Cup Foods where he was killed by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis.
The Sports Report: Athletes react to the Derek Chauvin verdict
Black men, Black women, Black kids, we are terrified.”Mookie Betts led the way for the Dodgers, deciding to sit out a game in San Francisco. 2008 — Robert Cheruiyot of Kenya wins the Boston Marathon in 2:07:46 to become the fourth man to win the race four times. 2014 — American Meb Keflezighi wins the Boston Marathon, a year after a bombing at the finish line left three dead and more than 260 people injured. Rita Jeptoo of Kenya successfully defends the Boston Marathon title, becoming the seventh three-time Boston Marathon champion. AdvertisementAnd finallyA quick look at Rosie Ruiz and the Boston Marathon.
Today’s Headlines: The Chauvin verdicts
TOP STORIESThe Chauvin VerdictsIt was a moment etched in time: Three guilty verdicts, read in quick succession. Newsletter Must-read stories from the L.A. Times Get all the day's most vital news with our Today's Headlines newsletter, sent every weekday morning. Enter email address Sign Me Up You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times. (Los Angeles Times)CALIFORNIA— Years after lawmakers backed it, Los Angeles still isn’t mandating annual inspections for oil and gas facilities. Support our journalism Subscribe to the Los Angeles Times.
The GOP’s Anglo-Saxon problem
Taken literally, it excludes not only Black, Latino and Asian Americans, but Irish Americans, Italian Americans and Jewish Americans as well — at least 63% of the population. No wonder McCarthy felt compelled to denounce it; the GOP is small enough without expelling Irish Americans like him. AdvertisementIn fact, Carlson’s “replacement theory” is more dangerous than Greene and Gosar’s loopy Anglo-Saxon manifesto. AdvertisementThat’s presumably why McCarthy’s rebuke to the Anglo-Saxon screed was milder than it might have been. One reason Trump lost his campaign for reelection was that his nativist rhetoric drove college-educated white voters away.
Grocery opening in NE OKC Black neighborhood declared a food desert
“That was a big disaster for the community,” Jones said. “That store (Buy For Less) wasn’t for the community,” Jones said. The area already was classified as a "food desert" by the USDA before the Buy For Less closing. More:OKC seeking to bring grocery stores into eastside food desertAn array of contributors, including the Inasmuch Foundation and Life Church, contributed to opening the Market at Eastpoint. “It's not the biggest grocery store, and you may not have 10 items of one thing, you might have three out of those 10,” Jones said.
PIERS MORGAN: George Floyd's despicably callous killer cop Derek Chauvin got what he deserved
And that, perhaps, is the single most shocking thing about the George Floyd verdict. So, when the unanimous jury verdicts came in of 'GUILTY', 'GUILTY', and 'GUILTY' I felt the same wave of relief that ricocheted around the world. Biden is pictured above on TuesdayIt was Chauvin's knee that caused the 'medical distress' and it was Chauvin's knee that killed George Floyd. The truth of the matter is that the reason George Floyd is dead is because Mr Chauvin's heart was too small'. I hope we're going to get a verdict that will say guilty, guilty, guilty.
California Democrat renewing push to expel Marjorie Taylor Greene
A California Democrat is renewing his push to expel Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene Marjorie Taylor GreeneRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says she's meeting with Trump 'soon' in Florida QAnon site shutters after reports identifying developer Republicans head to runoff in GA-14 MORE (R-Ga.) over her reported support for a so-called "America First Caucus." Rep. Jimmy Gomez Jimmy GomezMarjorie Taylor Greene to introduce resolution to expel Maxine Waters Democrats have a growing tax problem with SALT Hillicon Valley: Twitter says Greene account suspended in error | Justice Dept. Greene has publicly derided reports that she planned to launch a new caucus, calling herself a proud member of the House Freedom Caucus. Just 11 Republicans voted to strip Greene of her assignments earlier this year.
The Matter of Black Lives
Black Lives Matter has been described as “not your grandfather’s civil-rights movement,” to distinguish its tactics and its philosophy from those of nineteen-sixties-style activism. I continue to be surprised at how little Black lives matter. Black Lives Matter emerged as a modern extension of Ella Baker’s thinking—a preference for ten thousand candles rather than a single spotlight. “In affirming that black lives matter, we need not qualify our position,” the statement reads. For Garza, the assurance that black lives matter is as much a reminder directed at black people as it is a revelation aimed at whites.
The Heart of the Uprising in Minneapolis
In 2015, a white officer shot and killed a twenty-four-year-old unarmed African-American man, Jamar Clark, in North Minneapolis. One night, a white man opened fire on them, wounding five. The county prosecutor found “no basis to issue criminal charges against either officer.”Thirty-eighth and Chicago is on the Southside of Minneapolis. In 2007, five high-ranking black officers sued the department, alleging pervasive institutional racism, including death threats, signed “KKK,” that were sent to every black officer, through the departmental mail system. The only Minneapolis officer in recent memory to have been sentenced to jail for killing someone is Mohamed Noor, a black man, who shot Justine Damond, a white woman.
The Simple Facts of Derek Chauvin’s Trial
The homicide trial of the officer accused of killing Floyd, Derek Chauvin, which began in Minneapolis on March 29th, is focussed on a more discrete question. The jury will consider whether Chauvin’s use of force exceeded what was necessary to make the arrest, constituting murder or manslaughter. The most serious, second-degree murder, requires the prosecution to prove that Chauvin’s kneeling on Floyd’s neck was a felony assault that caused Floyd’s death. Nevertheless, the prosecution has devoted multiple trial days to establishing that Chauvin’s act was excessive. Multiple police officers and experts have clearly and repeatedly said that the force Chauvin used was disproportionate to any possible physical danger that Floyd presented in the moment.
The Significance of the Derek Chauvin Verdict
Talking with people in various communities, I found that there were a lot of people who expressed the idea that, at best, Derek Chauvin might be convicted of the least of the charges. They went through how deeply the community near where George Floyd was killed was traumatized. And we saw Derek Chauvin only infrequently. If Derek Chauvin had not been convicted, it would have said to the world that there is absolute impunity for police. With Derek Chauvin, you couldn’t get around the systemic implications of what had happened.
The Death of George Floyd Reignited a Movement. What Happens Now?
George Floyd had been dead only hours before the movement began. The moment of collective grief and anger swiftly gave way to a yearlong, nationwide deliberation on what it means to be Black in America. First came protests, in large cities and small towns across the nation, becoming the largest mass protest movement in U.S. history. Then, over the next several months, nearly 170 Confederate symbols were renamed or removed from public spaces. The “Black lives matter” slogan was claimed by a nation grappling with Mr. Floyd’s death.
Golden Globes Voter Philip Berk, Previously Accused of Groping Brendan Fraser, Expelled by HFPA for Racist Email
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the governing body overseeing the Golden Globe Awards, has expelled longtime member Philip Berk. The Los Angeles Times, who had access to the email chain, published several responses from members who received the email and slammed Berk for sending it. The HFPA — which is currently composed of a small selection of 87 international journalists that determine the nominees and winners of the annual awards ceremony — presently has no Black members. In 2018, actor Brendon Fraser accused Berk of assaulting him in the summer of 2003, while at a luncheon at the Beverly Hills Hotel. According to Fraser, the assault happened when Berk reached out to shake Fraser's hand on his way out of the hotel.
George Floyd's Family Says 'Today We Are Able to Breathe Again' After Derek Chauvin Is Found Guilty
George Floyd's family members reacted on Tuesday to the unanimous jury verdicts that found a former police officer guilty for his murder last May with relief, gratefulness, and a nod to historical precedent. George Floyd, the man who was killed by police officers in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. Rodney Floyd Rodney Floyd, George Floyd's brother | Credit: Emilie Richardson/Getty ImagesThe death of George, 46, and the viral video that captured it sparked the largest social justice protests in a generation. Another one of George's brothers, Terrance Floyd, said: "My family is a family that will not back down from prayer. chauvin trial Derek Chauvin | Credit: CNN"I don't know that I will get a chance to see that again," she said.
Why actress Jasika Nicole stopped doing cop shows (Op-ed)
Actress Jasika Nicole (Punky Brewster, The Good Doctor, Fringe) explains why she's made the decision to no longer appear on cop shows, and what Hollywood needs to do differently to address racism and power. I want straight white people to stop relying on a false sense of superiority to stake their success on. The devastating and unending loss of Black, brown, and indigenous life at the hands of our "protectors" is not occasional. The uncovering of alleged gangs in the L.A. County Sheriff's Department wreaking deliberate, murderous havoc on communities of color is not occasional. This is where my power, where all of our power lies — in naming ourselves and naming our futures.
Most powerful responses to the George Floyd murder trial verdict
The incident escalated and Chauvin, a white police officer, handcuffed Floyd before proceeding to kneel on his neck for almost ten minutes. In the wake of Derek Chauvin's guilty charges, we share some of the most powerful responses from political and public figures in the US. US President, Joe Biden:This content is imported from Twitter. — President Biden (@POTUS) April 20, 2021Vice President of the United States, Kamala Harris:This content is imported from Twitter. — Vice President Kamala Harris (@VP) April 21, 2021Barack Obama:This content is imported from Twitter.
A Gathering of Radical Love
So what do love, care, and solidarity look like for Asian people, who are grieving in response to the nonstop violence the community is facing? On Saturday afternoon, at the East River Park Amphitheater, it looked like a gathering of queer, trans, and gender nonconforming people of color embracing each other, handing out flowers, feeding each other, listening to one another, sitting in stillness, and dancing with each other. They all showed up for “Protect Asian Lives,” a gathering that emphasized communal healing and celebration. “The systems that oppress you are the same that oppress me, so your liberation is also my liberation,” said Kim. Photo: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat PinyodoonyachetPhoto: Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet
Chauvin Found Guilty On All Counts: Live Updates
pic.twitter.com/6vPfgPqcoo — Katie Mettler (@kemettler) April 20, 2021A Central Ohio Transit Authority bus operator reacts to Tuesday's Derek Chauvin verdict. the moment when Derek Chauvin is found guilty of murdering George Floyd. pic.twitter.com/xRtoOGoyvb — Jesse Washington (@jessewashington) April 20, 2021Tears of celebration at George Floyd Square as the verdict on Derek Chauvin was read, guilty on all charges. After the 12 jurors reaffirmed their verdict, Chauvin was handcuffed and remanded into custody ahead of a sentencing hearing scheduled in eight weeks. "I am convinced that there is going to be a guilty verdict coming," Courteney Ross says.
Former HFPA President Calls BLM a ‘Racist Hate Movement’
The HFPA condemns all forms of racism, discrimination, and hate speech and finds such language and content unacceptable.”The Times further reported that many members have replied to Berk to criticize the email. “The vile rhetoric contained in this screed is simply unacceptable,” Luca Celada, an HFPA board member, replied. After the HFPA found no evidence of wrongdoing in an 2018 investigation, Fraser called for Berk to step down from the group. Update, 3:50 p.m.: Phil Berk, the former Hollywood Foreign Press Association president who sent an email to members and staff calling Black Lives Matter “racist,” has now been expelled from the group, Variety reported. Neither Harper nor the HFPA has commented on the exit.
The Moment Minneapolis Heard Justice
Then someone said the judge was about to read the verdict and the crowd went completely quiet. State of Minnesota, County of Hennepin, District Court, Fourth Judicial District. “I feel like a little bit of justice has been served on a long, long, long road. “I feel amazing,” said Abdirahman Warsame, who was dressed from mask to toe in Black Lives Matter attire. “I’m going to George Floyd Square,“ she said.
George Floyd got justice. For families of others killed by police, it's 'not a fair fight.'
Quote iconDimock said she was emotionally prepared when she learned there would be no criminal charges for the officers involved in her son's death. Golden's family contends the officer slipped on ice and accidentally discharged his gun. Julio Cortez, APLike Floyd, Brian Quinones' death was captured on video from beginning to end. The five officers involved in Quinones' death were not charged. Quinones filed a wrongful death lawsuit seeking $50 million against the city and the officers involved last June.
How the G.O.P. Is Creating Harsher Penalties for Protesters
That was evidence, he said, that bills aimed at punishing protesters were disproportionately targeting people of color. The bill’s author, State Senator Rob Standridge, said the Tulsa incident had prompted him to seek immunity for drivers who strike protesters. He said Tuesday he wasn’t aware of any drivers who had been charged after striking protesters in Oklahoma. Carly Atchison, a spokeswoman for Mr. Stitt, declined to say whether he would sign the bill, which passed with veto-proof majorities. Dr. Crutcher said she was convinced that if Mr. Stitt signed the legislation, it would be applied in harsher terms against those protesting racial injustice than for white protesters demonstrating for gun rights or against abortion.
POLITICO Playbook: The verdict: A rush of relief as eyes turn to Congress
POLITICO Playbook: The verdict: A rush of relief as eyes turn to Congress Presented byPresident Joe Biden and VP Kamala Harris promised the Floyd family and the nation that the verdict was just a first step. President JOE BIDEN and VP KAMALA HARRIS promised the Floyd family and the nation that the verdict was just a first step. More Chauvin verdict reads …— Two good look-aheads: “Chauvin is guilty. She most recently was senior director at Acreage Holdings and VP at the Cannabis Trade Federation. …… Erica Borghard is now senior fellow for technology and international affairs at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and is still a senior director on the Cyberspace Solarium Commission.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
But he declared that “it’s not enough.”Biden spoke Tuesday from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here,” Biden declared. The verdict — and the aftermath — will be a continuing test for Biden. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
'This is our Selma moment:' Racial justice activists hope Derek Chauvin verdict spurs larger systemic change
“Since the moment George Floyd’s life was stolen, people have taken to the streets and issued demands, and what we have seen in this moment is that that bears fruit, that organizing works. 'We are able to breathe again'::George Floyd's family relieved, thankful for guilty verdict against Derek Chauvin. A not-guilty verdict, he said, would have prolonged the continued implosion of a nation he sees divided among racial lines. But we still have a way to go.”'We still have a lot of fighting to do'So despite that major step, activists and leaders cautioned that the path toward racial justice remains long. “And it’s important to name that in the struggle for racial justice.
Golden Globes crisis deepens as former president expelled and advisers resign
The crisis-plagued Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), the body that organises the Golden Globes, has expelled Philip Berk, its former president who sparked widespread outrage by sharing an anti-Black Lives Matter article that described the movement as a “racist hate group”. However, the HFPA was hit by further problems after it was reported that Dr Shaun Harper, its recently hired diversity and inclusion adviser, had resigned. Harper, the executive director of USC’s Race and Equity Center, had been hired as a consultant by the HFPA after criticism of the lack of diversity among the organisation’s membership. He reportedly resigned after a meeting with representatives of the Time’s Up campaign group, including director-producer Ava DuVernay and producer Shonda Rhimes. The crisis engulfing the HFPA began shortly before the Golden Globes award ceremony in January, when an LA Times report accused the organisation of a lack of diversity in its membership as well as “ethical lapses” in the way it conducted its business.
‘Justice has been served’: Lewis Hamilton welcomes George Floyd murder verdict
On Tuesday, Derek Chauvin, 45, was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter following a three-week trial in Minneapolis. Responding to Tuesday’s guilty verdicts, the British driver wrote on Instagram: “JUSTICE for George! Derek Chauvin has been found guilty. “The result of the Derek Chauvin trial today is the right one. “This trial was an opportunity for the justice system to hold Derek Chauvin accountable for his actions when he took the life of George Floyd.
Tucker Carlson calls support for George Floyd an ‘attack on civilisation’
Fox News host Tucker Carlson has called public support for George Floyd an “attack on civilisation” after a jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering the unarmed black man in Minneapolis last year. On his Tuesday evening show, Carlson interviewed a former New York corrections officer, Ed Gavin, who criticised Chauvin for using excessive force on Floyd. “After nearly a year of burning and looting and murder by BLM [Black Lives Matter], that was never in doubt. It’s an attack on civilisation.”His comments generated a backlash on social media with one commentator accusing him of having a “complete meltdown”. In a speech from the White House, he said: “No one should be above the law, and today’s verdict sends that message.
Biden assembled an all-star climate team. Now he has to deliver.
Biden’s most senior White House climate aides are all former managers of large agencies who are now content just to have the president’s ear. “There’s definitely an all-in ethos on this team.”There just isn’t much subtlety about the Biden team’s enthusiasm for climate action. They say his massive infrastructure plan reflects the dominance of environmental utopians inside his White House. “This administration has attracted the advocates, and they’re not just advocates for the sake of advocacy — they’re doers.”Some Biden climate officials came directly from the advocacy world. Shah says he asked tough questions in his job interviews to make sure the Biden team wouldn’t still be gun-shy about using it, and Granholm assured him the new clean-energy strategy would be: Deploy, deploy, deploy.
This isn’t justice — George Floyd is still dead
I took a breath in the name of George Floyd. George Floyd should still be here, instead of being made a martyr for social change. What does it mean, that it took the protests for George Floyd to even shine a light on the killing of Breonna Taylor, who died by police before him? George Floyd was not the first. And even then, we held our breaths in fear to hear it, every molecule screaming, “George Floyd.” His name filled our lungs as our stomachs soured and we said our prayers.
Derek Chauvin: Stephen Colbert says ‘it’s hard to celebrate because a man is still dead’ after guilty verdict
Stephen Colbert opened The Late Show with an emotional speech discussing Derek Chauvin’s conviction for the murder of George Floyd. On Tuesday (20 April) afternoon, former Minneapolis police officer Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter following the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man. The jury’s verdict was reached just before The Late Show with Stephen Colbert began filming that day, with the presenter opening the episode by discussing the trial. “After 10 hours of deliberation, a jury in Minneapolis decided that it’s illegal for the police to murder people. “It’s hard to celebrate because a man is still dead, but there is a sense of relief that at least this one injustice was not compounded with indifference.
‘Accountability not justice’: Bernie Sanders says celebrations over Chauvin verdict premature
Bernie Sanders has warned against premature celebrations by campaigners following the conviction of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd last year. In a series of tweets, the senator said that the “jury’s verdict delivers accountability for Derek Chauvin, but not justice for George Floyd”. He wrote: “Real justice for him and too many others can only happen when we build a nation that fundamentally respects the human dignity of every person. “We must boldly root out the cancer of systemic racism and police violence against people of color,” he tweeted. The incident had led to a series of Black Lives Matter protests across the US and the world.
George Floyd murder: Joe Biden says Derek Chauvin guilty verdict can be 'moment of significant change'
US President Joe Biden has welcomed the conviction of Derek Chauvin and said it can be a "moment of significant change" after the white former police officer was found guilty of murdering 46-year-old black man George Floyd. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Systemic racism a ‘stain on our nation’s soul’But he added: "It's not enough. Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman posted: "A reminder that victory would be George Floyd being alive. California Governor Gavin Newsom, a white man, wrote on Twitter that Mr Floyd "would still be alive if he looked like me. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he was "appalled" by Mr Floyd's death and welcomed the verdict.
Ohio police shoot dead Makhia Bryant on same day as George Floyd murder verdict
Bodycam footage released by Columbus police in Ohio show an officer fatally shooting 16-year-old Makhia Bryant, who later died from her injuries in hospital. Bodycam footage released by Columbus police in Ohio show an officer fatally shooting 16-year-old Makhia Bryant, who later died from her injuries in hospital.... Warning: Graphic imagesBlack Lives Matter protests have erupted in Ohio where a 16-year-old Black girl was shot dead by police today, just as the verdict was being delivered in the George Floyd murder trial. Police in Columbus have released graphic bodycam footage showing an officer firing multiple shots at Makhia Bryant, 16, who died in hospital a short time later. Chauvin was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second degree manslaughter over the death of Mr Floyd, 46, during an arrest on May 25, 2020.
Whether Darren Wilson Is Indicted or Not, the Entire System Is Guilty
How will residents of Ferguson react if (as many expect) the grand jury advises against an indictment of Darren Wilson, the officer who killed Mike Brown? I just know that indictments won’t and can’t end oppressive policing which is rooted in anti-blackness, social control and containment. I’m not invested in indicting Darren Wilson though I understand its (symbolic) import to many people, most especially Mike Brown’s family and friends. I list these actions with the understanding that together they aren’t enough to end oppressive policing. On the other hand, a decision to indict Darren Wilson isn’t a victory for ?‘justice’ or an end.
Chauvin Convicted of Murder in George Floyd's Death
Derek ChauvinDerek Chauvin was led away in handcuffs Tuesday after a Minneapolis jury found him guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd, who suffocated under Chauvin’s knee last May. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted on all three counts brought against him: second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. Dr. William J. Barber II (@RevDrBarber) April 20, 2021× The Verdict: The Evidence of Derek Chauvin’s Depraved Heart Murder of Fayetteville Native George Floyd Was Beyond a Reasonable Doubt. George Floyd’s death shouldn’t have happened and we must continue to work to bring positive change to our state and country. - RC — Governor Roy Cooper (@NC_Governor) April 20, 2021× More than justice after the fact, I wish George Floyd & others were still here.
Housing for Whom? City and State Nix Plan to Build Affordable Housing at World Trade Center Site
At the World Trade Center site, our own never-ending battle over real estate is coming to a close. This conclusion to the World Trade Center reconstruction saga occurs at a time when affordable housing has declined significantly in the surrounding area south of Chambers Street. In 2011, Community Board 1 published the findings of an affordable housing task force chaired by Battery Park City resident Tom Goodkind. Vicki Been hasn’t said much about 5 World Trade Center, and Open New York has now telegraphed that it won’t contest the ratio of affordability. The reconstruction at the World Trade Center was delayed so long that most of the civic organizations wound down before key government decisions were made.
What Maxine Waters actually said about the Chauvin trial
What Waters actually saidWhile attending a Black Lives Matter protest in Minneapolis on Saturday night, Waters responded to questions about the unfolding trial. Video of her remarks went viral, particularly among conservatives, who asserted Waters was urging protesters to riot if Chauvin was not convicted of murder. “Maxine Waters is inciting violence in Minneapolis,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted. To argue such language was common in politics, Trump’s defense attorneys pointed to examples of many Democrats, including Waters, making similar comments. Beyond the point about unrest, others have objected to Waters’s insistence that only one outcome in the trial — a guilty verdict of murder for Chauvin — is acceptable, saying that government officials should consider Chauvin innocent until proven guilty.
Why Chauvin’s conviction matters
The former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of all three charges — second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. Whether the verdict will lead to greater police accountability and build on the momentum ignited by Floyd’s death remains to be seen. Andrew Baker, the medical examiner who deemed Floyd’s death a homicide, cited Chauvin’s restraint and neck compression as the actions that caused Floyd’s heart, enlarged by a severe underlying disease, to beat faster and eventually stop. The defense, on the other hand, tried to argue that it was Floyd’s drug use, underlying health conditions, and carbon monoxide from the squad car’s exhaust pipe that contributed to Floyd’s death, not Chauvin’s use of force. The viral video of Floyd’s murder has fundamentally altered the way Americans think about the police.
Derek Chauvin's verdict brings relief, but America's justice system is still broken
Derek Chauvin was held accountable for killing George Floyd on Tuesday, but that doesn't mean America's justice system isn't broken. The unanimous verdict was delivered to the nation after a jury of 12 people deliberated for more than 10 hours. Viewers at home and people in the streets of Minneapolis breathed a collective sigh of relief upon hearing the verdict. Politicians including Cory Booker, Elizabeth Warren, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and former president Barack Obama were quick to tweet statements in support of the verdict and George Floyd's family. The efforts, protests, and calls for justice that preceded this verdict were massive and emotionally taxing, journalists and activists noted.
Derek Chauvin's verdict brings relief, but America's justice system is still broken
Derek Chauvin was held accountable for killing George Floyd on Tuesday, but that doesn't mean America's justice system isn't broken. pic.twitter.com/mihZQHqACV — Barack Obama (@BarackObama) April 20, 2021President Biden and VP Harris call the Floyd family after the GUILTY verdict! — Bernie Sanders (@SenSanders) April 20, 2021George Floyd's family and community deserved for his killer to be held accountable. — Elizabeth Warren (@SenWarren) April 20, 2021This verdict is justice served—but it is not justice for George Floyd. Al Sharpton, standing alongside Floyd's family and their attorneys, said, "We don't celebrate a man going to jail.
Derek Chauvin Was Found Guilty, But A Bigger Fight For Justice Is Still Ongoing
Alex Brandon / AP Lisa Robinson reacts on Tuesday in Washington as the guilty verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was announced. Americans waited tensely to hear the jury's verdict of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Tuesday. It was a feeling reiterated over and over again Tuesday after the Chauvin verdict was read in court. It was sacrificial blood that made this moment possible for history and America," said attorney Ben Crump moments after the Chauvin verdict was read. The jury's verdict delivers accountability for Derek Chauvin, but not justice for George Floyd.
Jackson Avery Probably Isn't Going Where Most Fans Think He Is On Grey's Anatomy
As Grey’s Anatomy approached Black Lives Matter protests and the realities of systemic racism in its April 15 episode, Jackson Avery (Jesse Williams) was conflicted. It’s where Jackson’s estranged father, Robert Avery, lives and works at a diner. Jackson also conclusively told Robert that he’s not his father anymore, nor a grandfather to Harriet. For starters, Robert was mentioned for the first time in a while in the latest Grey’s episode. Jackson may not consider Robert a father anymore, but he did tell him he seemed like a decent man during their last encounter.
'Queen Sugar' Season 6: Premiere Date, Cast, Trailer & Everything To Know
Just over a month before the drama’s fifth installment even premiered, OWN renewed Queen Sugar for a Season 6 in January. The Queen Sugar Season 6 Premiere DateAs Deadline reported, Queen Sugar Season 6 is already in production in New Orleans; it’s slated to premiere later this year. “What a joy and an honor to continue the stories of Queen Sugar with our partners at OWN and Warner Bros.,” DuVernay said in a statement at the time. Additional new Queen Sugar Season 6 cast members include Marquis Rodriguez as Isaiah, a college student wise beyond his years who befriends Micah West; and McKinley Freeman, who will play Dominic, a cultural anthropologist who captures the attention of Nova Bordelon (Wesley). The Queen Sugar Season 6 PlotThe Season 6 plot will likely explore such storylines as Ralph Angel and Darla’s decision for Blue to attend the school in Washington, D.C., as well as the relationships between Davis and Charley and Calvin and Nova.
St. Louis gun owner Mark McCloskey, who defended home from protesters, may seek US Senate seat
Mark McCloskey, a St. Louis attorney who, along with his wife, armed himself and confronted Black Lives Matter protesters outside their home last summer, said he is considering a run for a U.S. Senate seat. "I can confirm that it’s a consideration, yes," McCloskey told Politico on Tuesday. U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., previously announced he is retiring after serving in the Senate since 2011. Mark McCloskey told Politico he didn't have a timetable for making his decision about running. Several others have eyed the forthcoming U.S. Senate vacancy in Missouri, including former Republican Missouri Gov.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: 'We can't stop here'
But he declared that "it's not enough.”Biden spoke Tuesday from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here," Biden declared. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki repeatedly refused to explain Biden’s comments, doing nothing to dispel the impression that he thought Chauvin should be found guilty. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
Chauvin guilty verdict hailed as victory for justice in Southern Nevada
Historic Westside residents celebrated in neighborhood streets Tuesday after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted in the murder of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoLaverne Olson of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoChina Lewis, 29, of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoLaron Smith of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoDexter Myles, 49, of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd.
Oscar Grant’s family on the Chauvin conviction: ‘This is huge. We’ve been let down so many times’
For the family of Oscar Grant, who was killed by police in 2009, the guilty verdict for Derek Chauvin was a rare moment of accountability – and a potential turning point in their fight against police brutality. For the Grant family, there were mixed emotions. Oscar Grant was 22 years old and unarmed when he was killed on a train platform on New Year’s Day, 2009 in Oakland, California. Protesters call for justice in the killing of Oscar Grant on 13 June 2011 at the US district court building in Los Angeles. Photograph: Paul Sakuma/APThe events of last month have offered repeated reminders to Grant’s family that little has changed since his killing.
Jane Fonda says she was 'relieved' and 'grateful' after Minnesota jury found Derek Chauvin guilty
Jane Fonda revealed that she was 'relieved' and 'grateful' Tuesday after learning that Derek Chauvin had been found guilty on all counts in the death of George Floyd. 'I was so relieved, so grateful to the jury, so grateful to those policemen who testified against one of their own, testified against Chauvin. What we don't realize is that all of us lose, we all suffer because of racism,' Jane added. Jimmy also asked Jane if she agreed with a quote he just read saying the Chauvin case had made activists out of ordinary citizens. Jane also was asked by Jimmy if she remembered the 'exact moment' she became an activist.
'Let This Be a Turning Point': Chauvin Conviction Sparks Calls for 'True Justice'
Yet, the truth is that Chauvin being convicted for killing George Floyd is, unfortunately, the exception in this country, not the rule. We applaud our colleague AG Keith Ellison and his team for their leadership and commitment to justice for George Floyd and his family. "Of course, true justice for George Floyd would require him to still be alive... Not only did Derek Chauvin deny George Floyd his human rights, he also showed utter disregard for George Floyd's humanity. And our nation has not been accountable to the harm of centuries of racist policies embedded in our justice system and far beyond it." — Nina Turner (@ninaturner) April 20, 2021Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)"The jury's verdict delivers accountability for Derek Chauvin, but not justice for George Floyd.
Overnight News Digest April 20, 2021 Black teen killed by police in Columbus, Ohio
Columbus Dispatch: Columbus police shooting updates: Aunt says teen girl killed; crowd protests by Mark FerenchikOfficers responded to the scene and at 4:45 p.m. an officer-involved shooting was reported. Four months into Illinois’ mass vaccination program, a Tribune analysis of state and local data found deep imbalances in vaccine supply and demand. The final jury included one Black woman, two multiracial women, two White men, three Black men and four White women. But it added that the benefits of the Covid-19 vaccine outweighed the risks. Earlier this month, the EMA made the same recommendation for the Covid-19 vaccine produced by Oxford-AstraZeneca.
Minerva @ Midnight: strange times in the Show Me State
Mark McCloskey — the gun-toting St. Louis attorney who drew headlines last year for brandishing an assault rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters — says he’s looking at running for Missouri’s open Senate seat. “I can confirm that it’s a consideration, yes,” McCloskey said in a brief interview on Tuesday evening. McCloskey, a wealthy personal-injury lawyer, said that he had no timeline for making a decision about whether to enter the race for the seat from which Republican Sen. Roy Blunt is retiring. This past weekend, McCloskey spoke at a Jackson County GOP dinner, which also drew former Gov. Eric Greitens and state Attorney General Eric Schmitt, both of whom have announced their candidacies.
This white guy’s comment after the Chauvin verdict should give all hope. He got the wake-up call
I was very impressed with the humility and humanity of this guy's statement after the Chauvin verdict. We can thank Chauvin for awakening this white guy. I was very impressed with this white guy that MSNBC correspondent Shaquille Brewster interviewed. He asked the guy what he was thinking after the Chauvin verdict. He said he was there to support black and brown people.
Chauvin Guilty Verdict Has Thrown Fox Off Kilter, At Least For Now.
The Fox host and former judge voiced her approval on Tuesday after Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd. Yeah, all those scary black people outside the court pressured the jury into finding Chauvin guilty. As I said, earlier in the day he was speculating that Chauvin would be found not guilty. But what struck me is that he really believed that Chauvin would be found not guilty on the merits. But none of that has stopped him from commenting on political developments, so I am thinking he has been thrown off kilter by the guilty verdict.
Notable Reactions to the Verdict. Including Yours.
The Verdict —x Judge Peter Cahill reads guilty verdict in trial of Derek Chauvin, the former policeman who has been convicted of murdering George Floyd https://t.co/0BXNKYyACT pic.twitter.com/RlBcatsY1A — BBC Breaking News (@BBCBreaking) April 20, 2021The right result. — Preet Bharara (@PreetBharara) April 20, 2021Biden on the importance of the verdict -x Today, a jury in Minnesota found former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd. — Bernie Sanders (@SenSanders) April 20, 2021Our work continues -x This verdict is the work of George Floyd's family. — Eric Swalwell (@ericswalwell) April 20, 2021Let’s keep up the pressure on the Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act must now become law.
Facebook intensified political censorship in advance of Chauvin verdict
On Monday, Facebook announced it would “limit content that could lead to civil unrest or violence” in advance of the jury verdict in the trial of Derrick Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who was found guilty Tuesday on all three counts for the murder of George Floyd last year. Waters’s statement was also used in the courtroom by Chauvin’s attorney Eric Nelson to argue for a mistrial on the grounds that jury had been prejudiced by media coverage of Waters’s statement and protests demanding a guilty verdict over the weekend. Throughout the protests against police violence over the summer, which involved approximately 20 million people in the US, the Democrats supported the false characterization of the demonstrations as violent and compared them to the fascist mobs organized by the Republican Party. For example, then the Democratic Party’s candidate for the White House, President Joe Biden, said in August, “I condemn violence of every kind by anyone, whether on the left or the right. In a significant example of the political character of Facebook’s content policy, platform moderators blocked the sharing of a New York Post article on Thursday that exposed the $3.2 million in real estate purchases of Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors.
Derek Chauvin found guilty of all charges in police murder of George Floyd
Nearly eleven months after George Floyd was brutally murdered at the hands of Minneapolis, Minnesota police, former officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty Tuesday of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. But the mainstream media and high-ranking Democrats responded to the verdict by attempting to frame Floyd’s murder entirely in racial terms. White supremacy has no place in democracy, especially one that is supposed to guarantee us our freedom to live.”There is no denying that racism and other backward conceptions are promoted in the police. Floyd’s younger brother Rodney Floyd spoke to this universal sentiment at a press conference following the verdict. Genevieve Hansen, who is also white, identified herself as a paramedic as officers pinned Floyd to the ground.
Black Americans are buoyed by Chauvin conviction, but they worry it will blunt pace of reform
(Montinique Monroe for The Washington Post) Women embrace at Scott Food Store in Houston. (Montinique Monroe for The Washington Post) BOTTOM LEFT: Women embrace at Scott Food Store in Houston. In her community, neighbors hugged, motorists honked cars horns and people whooped as the Chauvin verdict was read. (Joshua Lott/The Washington Post) In D.C., London Williams reacts after the Chauvin verdict. (Joshua Lott/The Washington Post) BOTTOM RIGHT: In D.C., London Williams reacts after the Chauvin verdict.
Opinion: What we know so far about Adam Toledo's death is unacceptable
They were protesting the killing of Adam Toledo, 13, by a police officer in the early morning hours of March 29. While many questions remain, much of what we know so far is unacceptable. Yet Officer Stillman acted as judge, jury and executioner. A lawyer for Officer Stillman said that Adam's shooting was justified, given the nature of the threat. This statement is correct: Officer Stillman made the decision to shoot Adam.
Flashpoint of 1992 LA riots becomes a place of celebration
In 1991, four Los Angeles police officers brutally beat motorist Rodney King and their acquittal on state charges a year later prompted one of the worst race riots in American history. The verdict was met with both joy and sorrow nationwide — especially at an infamous intersection in South Los Angeles. ADVERTISEMENTThe place where Florence and Normandie avenues meet is indelible in the history of the city of Los Angeles. The cross-streets are where, in the aftermath of the jury’s decision, Black men dragged white truck driver Reginald Denny from his big rig and beat him nearly to death. She saw parallels between King’s beating 30 years ago and the police treatment of Black men today.
Where The Chauvin Verdict Fits In The Recent History Of High-Profile Police Killings
In fact, Chauvin is believed to be just the second officer to be convicted in an on-duty death case in Minnesota's history. And it's impossible to ignore the role that race plays in such events, with many of these shootings involving white officers and Black victims. Here's a look at the outcomes of several high-profile cases in recent years. Tensing's first trial, in 2016, ended with the jury unable to reach a unanimous verdict on murder and manslaughter charges. A jury found him guilty of third-degree murder and manslaughter, and not guilty of intentional second-degree murder, in 2019.
The Rush: The Sports World Reacts to the Derek Chauvin Verdict
The WrapFormer Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts of murder and manslaughter on Tuesday for his role in the killing of George Floyd. Chauvin, who faced charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, was remanded into custody following the announcement. Chauvin remained silent as the verdicts were read; he and other courtroom participants were masked during the proceedings. His eyes could be seen scanning the room as his fate was verdicts were read and the judge asked each juror to confirm their decisions. The video of Floyd’s encounter with Chauvin and three other officers was shared far and wide last summer.
Flashpoint of 1992 LA riots becomes a place of celebration
The cross-streets are where, in the aftermath of the jury's decision, Black men dragged white truck driver Reginald Denny from his big rig and beat him nearly to death. On Tuesday, however, the intersection was a place for celebration in the wake of Chauvin’s guilty verdict. A racially diverse group of several dozen people gathered to praise the jury’s decision and call for continued accountability. A Black man in a Lakers cap danced on the street corner, chanting: “Get used to this, get used to justice!”Passing cars blared their horns as demonstrators waved signs and Black Lives Matter flags. “Justice has been done,” said Sherri Burks, 52, as a man walking by added “finally!”Burks lives around the corner from Florence and Normandie and recalled the 1992 riots.
Minneapolis hopes for new beginning after verdict: ‘George Floyd is a movement’
A guilty verdict in Floyd’s case would only be the beginning, Garraway said: there were hundreds more victims of police violence in Minnesota. “George Floyd is a movement.”A couple pause for a moment in front of a portrait of George Floyd. Floyd was one man ... George Floyd is a movement Courteney RossDaunte Wright’s brother was in the crowd. “Y’all keep the same energy ya’ll kept for George Floyd for that man,” Frank Nitty, an activist from Wisconsin, had said. “We get justice for George Floyd, and they’ll try to kill another one of us tomorrow,” Nitty said.
‘The work continues’: Black Americans stress that police reform is still needed
That is true #justice.”Oh, that George Floyd were still alive. “True justice requires that we come to terms with the fact that Black Americans are treated differently, every day,” the Obamas said. There is relief, punishment, but not ‘justice’.”i cannot emphasize enough that convictions are not justice for George Floyd. People pose for pictures in front of a mural for George Floyd in Minneapolis. Photograph: Morry Gash/AP“We’re relieved this Hennepin county jury has held Derek Chauvin accountable for the murder of George Floyd.
Photos: Reaction to Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
Carlos Barria/Reuters A man reacts outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on Tuesday, April 20, after former police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty in the death of George Floyd. In pictures: Reaction to Derek Chauvin guilty verdictCarlos Barria/Reuters A man reacts outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on Tuesday, April 20, after former police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty in the death of George Floyd. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted on all three charges in the murder of George Floyd. The verdict came Tuesday, April 20, after three weeks of testimony in one of the most closely watched cases of the Black Lives Matter era. Floyd's death set off unrest and mass protests challenging the ways that police treat Black people in the United States.
St. Louis lawyer who pointed gun at Black Lives Matter protesters considering Senate run
Mark McCloskey, who rose to national prominence after he was seen pointing an assault rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters in St. Louis last year, is looking at a possible Senate run in Missouri. McCloskey, a wealthy personal-injury lawyer, said in an interview with Politico that a Senate run is a “consideration.”McCloskey and his wife, Patricia, garnered attention in 2020 after they were seen waving guns at protesters outside their St. Louis mansion. The GOP is already grappling with the candidacy of former Gov. Eric Greitens, who resigned in disgrace in 2018 over allegations he had an affair with his hairdresser and blackmailed and sexually assaulted her. Former state Sen. Scott Sifton and attorney Lucas Kunce are among those running for the Democrats.
Columbus Police shot and killed someone as the Chauvin verdict was announced. Family members say the victim was a teenage Black girl.
Columbus, Ohio police fatally shot someone Tuesday afternoon as the nation awaited the Derek Chauvin verdict. Family members have identified Ma'khia Bryant, a Black teenager, as the victim, according to media reports. Columbus police confirmed to local media outlets that a victim had died in an "officer-involved shooting" on the east side of Columbus Tuesday afternoon. Hazel Bryant told The Columbus Dispatch that the teenage victim was her niece. WSYX reporter Alexis Moberger captured video of a woman at the scene who said her teenage niece was the victim.
Bill, Hillary Clinton say jury made 'right decision' in finding Derek Chauvin guilty: 'Black lives matter'
Former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton each reacted to Tuesday's verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder trial. The former president said the jury "made the right decision" in convicting Chauvin, an ex-Minneapolis police officer on murder charges in the death of George Floyd in the city last May. DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL VERDICT: EX-MINNEAPOLIS POLICE OFFICER FOUND GUILTY ON ALL CHARGES IN GEORGE FLOYD'S DEATHHe said that could be Floyd’s "lasting legacy." Hillary Clinton, the Democratic Party's 2016 presidential nominee, said Floyd’s family and community finally received "accountability" for his murder in her own statement on Twitter. The Minneapolis jury found Chauvin, 45, guilty on all three charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
But he declared that “it’s not enough.”Biden spoke Tuesday from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here,” Biden declared. The White House had been privately weighing how to handle the verdict, dispatching specially trained community facilitators from the Justice Department in anticipation of potential protests, officials said. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
The death of George Floyd reignited a movement. What happens now?
In the months after Floyd’s death, some change has been concrete. Floyd’s death, most Americans agreed early last summer, was part of a broader pattern — not an isolated incident. Even as the outcry over Floyd’s death has raised awareness of it, other trends tied to the pandemic have only exacerbated that inequality. White Americans unfamiliar with the concept of structural racism drove books on the topic to the top of bestseller lists. George Floyd’s death created a new energy around making changes, though it’s not clear how lasting they will be,” said Rashad Robinson, president of Color for Change.
Derek Chauvin Trial Live Updates: Chauvin Found Guilty of Murdering George Floyd
“I’m glad that he was found guilty on all charges, even if he might not be guilty of all charges,” Mr. Gutfeld said. He was quickly interrupted by Ms. Pirro, who had been muttering in disapproving tones as Mr. Gutfeld was speaking. Ms. Pirro scolded Mr. Gutfeld for his views, saying the verdict was a result of clear facts presented by prosecutors. At stake is far more than the future of Derek Chauvin or the memory of George Floyd. As she spoke, a caption appeared onscreen: “BLATANT INTIMIDATION DURING DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL.”
Bubba Wallace: 'Justice Served' with Derek Chauvin Verdict for George Floyd Murder
Steve Helber/Associated PressNASCAR driver Bubba Wallace responded on Twitter Tuesday to the conviction of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd:Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for the murder of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, in May 2020. Floyd's death spurred worldwide protests in the name of racial justice, with many athletes getting involved. Wallace supported the protests against police brutality by wearing a shirt that read "I Can't Breathe" and "Black Lives Matter" ahead of a NASCAR race. The 27-year-old is the only Black full-time driver in the NASCAR Cup Series. Wallace received support from his fellow drivers in June after a noose was found in his garage.
'It's a start': People in Minneapolis greet the Chauvin conviction with mixed emotions
After it was announced, crowds spilled out into the streets, with many people alternating between chants of "George Floyd, say his name," "Black lives matter" and "All three." Black Lives Matter flags flew from car windows. People gather outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis after the guilty verdicts against Derek Chauvin on Tuesday. People gather around the memorial to George Floyd after the Derek Chauvin verdicts were announced Tuesday in Minneapolis. Some stopped at the intersection where Floyd was pinned to the pavement — now known as George Floyd Square — to pay their respects.
16-Year-Old Black Girl Who Called For Help, Fatally Shot By Police, Ohio Family Says
16-Year-Old Black Girl Who Called For Help, Fatally Shot By Police, Ohio Family SaysEnlarge this image toggle caption Jay LaPrete/AP Jay LaPrete/APA 16-year-old Black girl was fatally shot by a white officer outside of her home after she called the police for help on Tuesday afternoon, according to her family. The girl has been identified as Ma'Khia Bryant by her aunt, Hazel Bryant. Bryant allegedly called officers at about 4:30 p.m. local time when a group of "older kids" threatened her with assault, her aunt told Ohio Statehouse News Bureau Reporter Andy Chow. [Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation] is on the scene conducting an independent investigation," Ginther wrote. News of the officer-involved shooting also drew protesters to the Columbus Police Department headquarters, where many chanted for Bryant's name to be called.
'Finally': America Reacts To Chauvin Guilty Verdict
'Finally': America Reacts To Chauvin Guilty VerdictEnlarge this image toggle caption Brandon Bell/Getty Images Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesScenes of joy and relief erupted across the country after a jury found Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd. The jury found Chauvin guilty on all three charges in Floyd's death during an arrest last Memorial Day: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. But still you're sitting, thinking back to the Rodney King days — everybody saw that too — those cops got off." He's not confident that one guilty verdict will change much when it comes to the problem of police brutality. Until everybody, everybody, learns to love each other."
Guilty verdicts in Floyd’s death bring joy -- and wariness
It’s already hard as it is as a Black man in today’s society,” said Williams, standing with a date in the space near the White House renamed after Floyd’s death last May. The joy and relief stood in stark contrast to the anger and sometimes violent protests that engulfed the country following Floyd’s death. Why should we be thankful when George Floyd doesn’t have his life or his future?” the Ethical Society of Police said in a statement. Many saw the trial as a litmus test for how sincere Americans are about racial justice and consequential police reform after Floyd’s death set off global protests. In Grand Rapids, which had some of Michigan’s worst violence after Floyd’s death, authorities placed concrete barriers around the police building before the verdict was announced.
Columbus Police Fatally Shoot Black Teen Who Called Them for Help, Aunt Says
The shooting victim has not been officially identified, but was named as 15-year-old Makiyah Bryant by a relative early Tuesday evening. She was loving,” Hazel Bryant, who said the child was her niece, told reporters on the east side of Columbus. I’m so thankful that someone from the family was actually on the scene,” Bryant said. “We have to remember that we should love each other.”Her mother, Paula Bryant, told 10 WBNS, “She was a very loving, peaceful little girl. Makiyah Bryant!” and “Black Lives Matter!”Hana Abbur-Rahim, the lead organizer of Black Abolitionist Collective Ohio, told The Daily Beast the shooting was proof of an alarming trend.
Guilty verdict in George Floyd case resonates across globe
The guilty verdict Tuesday against a former Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd drew global attention in a case that has cast an international spotlight on the problem of police brutality in the United States and abroad. The Floyd case invigorated calls for an end to police brutality against minorities, especially people of African and Arab ancestries, in England, France and elsewhere in Europe. “Here in Chile the reform of the police is still pending.”In Chile, tweeted journalist Patricio López, “George Floyd would be a Mapuche,” referring to an Indigenous group that has been subject to discrimination and police violence. AdvertisementThe case of Floyd also resonated deeply in Brazil, where many Black residents say they face police harassment and brutality. “Brazil is a country of thousands of victims like George Floyd,” Marcelo Freixo, a federal lawmaker in Rio de Janeiro, tweeted Tuesday.
Globes group ousts member over his Black Lives Matter email
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association board said in an email Tuesday that Phil Berk is no longer a member of the organization. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement” and described Cullors as a “self-proclaimed trained Marxist,” according to a report from the Los Angeles Times. AdvertisementThe email was sent to HFPA members, staff and the group’s general counsel and chief operating officer. At the time, the group had 87 members who are journalists, but none are Black, the Times reported. The organization has said that an “action plan” was under development to admit Black members.
‘A pebble in the ocean’: Crowds react with joy, wariness to verdict in Floyd’s death
It’s already hard as it is as a Black man in today’s society,” said Williams, standing with a date in the space near the White House renamed after Floyd’s death last May. Jesse Jackson, who traveled to Minneapolis for the verdict, said in a telephone interview. “It means so much to me,” said Venisha Johnson, a Black woman who cried at a gathering in what’s been dubbed George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. Floyd’s death on May 25 as Chauvin pressed a knee to his neck and the graphic bystander video that captured him pleading that he couldn’t breathe shocked and appalled the world and triggered protests against police brutality and racial injustice. In Grand Rapids, which had some of Michigan’s worst violence after Floyd’s death, authorities placed concrete barriers around the police building before the verdict was announced.
Guilty verdicts in Floyd's death bring joy -- and wariness
Why should we be thankful when George Floyd doesn’t have his life or his future?” the Ethical Society of Police said in a statement. Many saw the trial as a litmus test for how sincere Americans are about racial justice and consequential police reform after Floyd's death set off global protests. “It means so much to me,” said Venisha Johnson, a Black woman who cried at a gathering in what's been dubbed George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. “I’ve been praying for George every day, every morning at 6 a.m. I’m just so happy. A Black man in a Lakers cap danced and chanted: “Get used to this, get used to justice!” Passing cars blared their horns as demonstrators waved signs and Black Lives Matter flags.
‘Enough of the senseless killings’: Biden calls Chauvin verdict ‘a start’ as Democrats demand action
Addressing the nation on Tuesday evening, Joe Biden said the guilty verdict for the former Minneapolis police office Derek Chauvin was “a start”. “The guilty verdict does not bring back George,” he continued, noting that he had called the Floyd family after the news had come. The rare guilty verdict came as a shock and a relief to many lawmakers and public figures. @RepKarenBass and @RepGwenMoore in an emotional embrace on the heels of the Chauvin guilty verdict. In an address from Capitol Hill, she said: “Thank you, George Floyd, for sacrificing your life for justice.
Why A Guilty Verdict For Derek Chauvin Doesn’t Change The Reality Of Police Violence
Why A Guilty Verdict For Derek Chauvin Doesn’t Change The Reality Of Police Violence Police brutality in the U.S. goes far beyond one high-profile case. The murder trial for Derek Chauvin was notable in many ways. On Tuesday, a jury in Minneapolis ruled that Chauvin was guilty on all three charges: second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree-manslaughter. It was clear to many who watched the video of Floyd’s death, including the Minneapolis police chief, that Chauvin used excessive force. In their eyes, the guilty verdict against Chauvin only furthers the need for more reform.
Across the US, a tidal wave of joy fills city streets after Derek Chauvin is convicted in the death of George Floyd
Some cities had already activated the National Guard as the Chauvin verdict loomed; others declared states of emergency. GEORGE FLOYD!” Some cried and hugged at George Floyd Square, the site of Floyd's death. More:Derek Chauvin found guilty on all counts in the murder of George FloydOpinion:Derek Chauvin is guilty of murdering George Floyd. Some chanted "guilty, guilty" and many carried signs reading, "Jail killer cops now." More:What are the odds Derek Chauvin is successful in appeal of guilty verdict in George Floyd murder?
Police officer shot and killed teenager in Columbus, Ohio, family member says
COLUMBUS, Ohio — An angry crowd gathered near an Ohio home Tuesday night where a police officer fatally shot a person while responding to an attempted stabbing call. The Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation was on the scene Tuesday night to investigate a fatal shooting by a Columbus police officer. Police have provided no information about the person shot or the circumstances of the shooting. Protesters with Black Lives Matter signs, megaphones and a loudspeaker joined the crowd gathered behind crime scene tape about a half-block away from the shooting scene. Columbus police released body camera footage of the incident last week and identified two officers involved in the shooting.
Across the TV news spectrum, Chauvin verdict has pundits sharing a sigh of relief
Commenting on MSNBC, former Republican National Committee chairman Michael Steele said he fist-pumped when he heard the verdict. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisement“Clearly, the verdict is supported by the facts,” said Jeanine Pirro, a former county judge who hosts one of the network’s top opinion shows. “Right now, what people need to understand is that the American justice system works. On Tuesday, news networks were given about a 30-minute advance warning that a verdict was about to be read. AdvertisementMSNBC analyst Jason Johnson had predicted that Chauvin would be found guilty, but breaking with many of his colleagues, he sounded pessimistic about the verdict’s significance.
New York BLM protesters heckle taqueria diners: 'Stay the f--- out of New York'
A crowd of Black Lives Matter supporters was recorded heckling diners at a taqueria in New York City, telling them to "get the f--- out" and saying that the "white-owned" establishment wasn’t welcome. GRAPHIC LANGUAGE WARNING:The man shouts the following slogans, which the crowd repeats: "Stay the f--- out of New York! He then shouts at the crowd: "We don’t want your f---ing taqueria!" But the protesters enthusiasm slips noticeably and the man tries to save the routine by adding: "…owned by f---ing white men!" But one Twitter user quipped that getting "the f--- out of New York" was something he did 20 years ago – a move he said was a "great decision."
I Wish I Were Relieved
When we report on Black death and trauma, we’re most often mourning at the same time, and then we do it again after we step away from work. This verdict doesn’t mean Floyd’s family stops grieving. It doesn’t mean that Black America has found solace in the justice system. I’m more optimistic about our own quest for liberation than a broken system showing us what justice should be. I just wish more of us could actually live to see what true justice is.
George Floyd's family say 'we can breathe again' after guilty verdict for Derek Chauvin
Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, said in a statement: “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America. “I would not call today’s verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration, but it is accountability which is the first step towards justice,” he said. “This verdict reminds us that we must make enduring enduring, systemic, societal change.” Derek Chauvin arrives in court for the verdict on Tuesday afternoon. The second-degree murder charge required the jury to find that Chauvin committed a crime by kneeling on Floyd’s neck, which in turn led to his death. George Floyd’s brother Philonise Floyd speaks alongside Reverend Al Sharpton and attorney Ben Crump following the verdict.
‘Tonight we celebrate justice’: Bay Area reflects on Derek Chauvin verdict
Bay Area residents celebrated the conviction of a former police officer Tuesday in the murder of George Floyd while also taking time for deep, quiet reflection — and recommitting to the fight for justice. “But we can’t only get that for one Black man or one Black child. Multiple protesters were injured, and Bay Area police departments have faced criticism and lawsuits over their handling of the situation. “Sure, it’s definitely better than what usually happens, but it doesn’t change the fact that George Floyd is dead,” he said. As of about 7 p.m. Tuesday evening, no large protests had developed in the Bay Area, though people were gathering to reflect and process the news in public places around the region.
'Full accountability for everyone': Legal community applauds verdict in Minnesota trial of Derek Chauvin
Thousands of people demonstrated for months, demanding criminal justice reform and justice for George Floyd. After a day of deliberation, a jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of murder in Floyd's death in May 2020. Ripple effects across legal systemThe verdict will have a long-lasting impact on the legal system, according to those working in Arizona's county attorney offices, law enforcement agencies and defense community. “This verdict hopefully sends a message that the criminal justice system does not work without full accountability for everyone," the group stated. Reach criminal justice reporter Lauren Castle at Lauren.Castle@gannett.com.
What Kind of Flag Can I Fly Outside My House?
There are more than 370,000 homeowners associations across the country, collectively representing more than half of all owner-occupied U.S. homes. At a time when even the image of the American flag has become polarizing, these policies are leading to accusations of partisanship and violations of constitutional rights. The First Amendment prohibits the government from infringing on a citizen’s right to free speech, but homeowners associations aren’t government entities. Kara Wilkoff, 40, and Ben Wilkoff, 38, hung a Black Lives Matter flag outside of their home last August. “I wanted to be supportive of the Black lives in my life, my children’s lives and my father’s life.
Las Vegas residents, leaders react to Chauvin verdict
Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoChina Lewis, 29, of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoSyanannah Baylor, center, of Las Vegas and Rodney Carter of Grover Beach, Calif., react at Mario's Westside Market in Las Vegas on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the verdicts in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoNia Lovelace, 29, of Las Vegas cries Tuesday, April 20, 2021, after hearing about guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoLaron Smith of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoDexter Myles, 49, of Las Vegas reacts Tuesday, April 20, 2021, to the guilty verdicts in the trial of Derek Chauvin in death of George Floyd.
In their own words: Oregon activists, politicians react to Derek Chauvin conviction
We need to reframe the calls to reform the criminal justice system to calls to reform the administration of Justice. Derek Chauvin was rightfully declared guilty for the murder of George Floyd. The Senate must pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act to help end the targeting of Black communities by police. The conviction of Derek Chauvin on second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter charges is an essential statement of accountability in our justice system. Nearly a year ago, we wrote that: “What happened to George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of a police officer is revolting, incomprehensible, and unacceptable.
Celebration was in the air at George Floyd Square as Derek Chauvin verdict read
But an uneasy buzz hovered around George Floyd Square as the verdict was to be announced to the world soon. And as the clock ticked past 3 p.m., more people of all ages and colors gathered to be part of history — good or bad — at the spot where Floyd took his last breath on May 25. And he’s been a regular at George Floyd Square since the 46-year-old was killed by then-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. But Ebony Hawkins, who had a “Black Lives Matter” flag draped over shoulders, was somber. “You want justice for George Floyd for what happened, and then we were worried about what if the trial went the opposite way.
In NM, guilty verdict brings relief, awareness that racial injustice persists
“We’re not coming together to express rage and anger and sadness and trauma; it was kind of unbelievable,” Archuleta said. In Albuquerque, the 2016 trial of two police officers who were charged with murder ended in a hung jury when jurors could not decide whether they were guilty. Keith Sandy and Dominique Perez shot and killed James Boyd, who was camping in the Sandia foothills, in 2014. On Tuesday, local leaders responded to Chauvin’s conviction by saying it brought some measure of justice to communities that have been working for change. Police Chief Harold Medina said that in Albuquerque, “we often come short when it comes to practicing what we preach” with racial justice.
Police fatally shoot 15-year-old girl in Columbus, Ohio
Authorities are investigating the fatal shooting of a 15-year-old girl in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday afternoon, which occurred just moments before Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd. The local ABC station said that family had identified the girl as Makiyah Bryant. According to the Columbus Dispatch, police received a 911 call about an alleged attempted stabbing. “This afternoon a young woman tragically lost her life,” he said. “We do not know all of the details.”This afternoon a young woman tragically lost her life.
‘We matter’: A moment of catharsis after the Derek Chauvin verdict
Outside the Cup Foods convenience store where George Floyd was killed last May, a woman nearly collapsed in tears upon hearing the guilty verdicts against Derek Chauvin, the police officer who killed Floyd. For some Black Americans, the moment was especially poignant, an affirmation that justice had been served for Floyd. People gather outside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, on Tuesday to celebrate the guilty verdict in the George Floyd case. But she also said a verdict in a single case still meant only that — one verdict. A man carries a portrait of George Floyd as people gather outside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, on Tuesday.
'It can't stop here': Biden, after Chauvin verdict, calls for passage of George Floyd bill
A Minneapolis jury Tuesday afternoon found Chauvin, 45, guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the murder of George Floyd last May. "George Floyd died almost a year ago. Biden speaks to Floyd family after verdictEarlier in the afternoon, Biden called the Floyd family after the guilty verdict was announced. More:Derek Chauvin found guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd: Live updates"We're going to get a lot more done (on police reform)." "You've got it pal," Biden said when Crump pushed for final passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which cleared the Democratic-controlled House in March.
'A small measure of justice': GM, Facebook respond to the Derek Chauvin guilty verdicts
A jury found Derek Chauvin, 45, guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for the killing of Floyd last May. "Right now I'm thinking of George Floyd, his family and those who knew him. But real justice would be for George Floyd to be alive and in the arms of his family,'' she wrote. Chauvin found guilty and nation reacts:Derek Chauvin guilty verdict sparks reactions across the nationWhat were the charges? Here's what the jury is considering for the death of George Floyd.
Derek Chauvin Trial Live Updates: Chauvin Found Guilty of Murdering George Floyd
Live Derek Chauvin Trial Live Updates: Chauvin Found Guilty of Murdering George Floyd Mr. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. To proclaim this historical moment, not just for the legacy of George Floyd, but for the legacy of America. Relatives of George Floyd, the Black man killed by the former police officer Derek Chauvin, spoke out after Mr. Chauvin was found guilty of murder and manslaughter. A screen in Times Square showing the reaction in Minnesota after the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd. Tim Walz of Minnesota and the other was to Philonese Floyd, George Floyd’s brother.
Media tenses up, then exhales as Derek Chauvin found guilty of George Floyd's murder
"Guilty, guilty, guilty on all three counts. After the verdict was read, TV cameras quickly shifted to gatherings outside the courthouse and in George Floyd Square, where Chauvin kneeled on the dying Floyd last Memorial Day. "NBC Nightly News" anchor Lester Holt closed his special report asking how the Chauvin trial and verdict might affect the larger culture. But tonight, the family of George Floyd has received justice in a Minneapolis courtroom," he said. "What happens on America’s streets might tell us if there is a deeper reckoning in the tragedy of George Floyd.”
'A small measure of justice': GM, Facebook respond to the Derek Chauvin guilty verdicts
A jury found Derek Chauvin, 45, guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for the killing of Floyd last May. "Right now I'm thinking of George Floyd, his family and those who knew him. But real justice would be for George Floyd to be alive and in the arms of his family,'' she wrote. "This brutal tragedy is one page in the much larger story of systemic racism, oppression, and injustice in our country." Chauvin found guilty and nation reacts:Derek Chauvin guilty verdict sparks reactions across the nationWhat were the charges?
New Yorkers gather to celebrate after Chauvin guilty verdict
New Yorkers gathered and marched across the city in droves on Tuesday evening to celebrate the conviction of former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd. A person holds a sign after the verdict in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. No peace.”A protester holds a sign after the verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Vernon resident and organizer with Strategy for Black Lives, said he was left feeling “bittersweet” by the verdict. Paul Martinka“I’m very happy to see Derek Chauvin be convicted,” Fenichel said.
After a year of outrage and a push for change, the sports world embraces the Derek Chauvin verdict
Michele Roberts, the National Basketball Players Association’s executive director, began having discussions last week about what union members would do if Chauvin were acquitted. The shift seemed unavoidable because it occurred in the early stages of a pandemic, during a pause in sports that eliminated distractions. It led to the NBA placing “Black Lives Matter” on its courts in the Disney World bubble that it created to finish its season. “Sadly, it was not the case that it was shocking and unusual news that a Black man was killed by the police. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisement“The outrage that our players expressed reminded me of how young they were and how young many of us are.
The Trailer: Cops vs. Krasner: A fight over criminal justice reform in Philadelphia
“We're going to have robocalls,” said McNesby, the president of the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge #5, from his northeast Philadelphia office. Krasner's 2017 win was sealed in a primary where around 150,000 voters cast ballots, tripling turnout from the past election. “This call to accountability has grown here in Philadelphia, and I feel like he has been at the forefront of that. “I am honored once again to be attacked by President Trump, the most criminal U.S. president of my lifetime,” Krasner said at the time. McNesby said that any focus by Krasner on Trump was a distraction, and that the union would happily work with any president.
In D.C., the guilty verdict in Chauvin trial is met with cheers, tears and relief
The District, like much of the country, braced for another explosion of anger if the jury let Chauvin walk. At Black Lives Matter Plaza — which didn’t exist before Floyd took his final breath — they cried. “I feel like all Black men can feel safe today,” Williams said, then he thought of the police. In Richmond, another city upended by months of demonstrations, a crowd of about 20 people gathered near the Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue to cheer and wave a multicolored Black Lives Matter flag. Across the street from Black Lives Matter Plaza, Bob Marley music played from a speaker near Lafayette Square, and a small crowd whooped and cheered.
‘Today, we are able to breathe again’: Floyd’s family members celebrate verdict, vow to fight on for racial justice
As family members and civil rights leaders such as the Rev. Story continues below advertisementThe Floyd family attorney, Ben Crump, cast the verdict as a critical moment in America’s troubled history of race, policing and criminal justice. Before the verdict was announced, Floyd’s family members gathered in a hotel conference room in downtown Minneapolis and braced themselves for what was to come. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act has passed the House but remains stalled in the Senate. Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison (D) was among several top officials who acknowledged Floyd’s family in the aftermath of the verdict.
Kudlow: Biden, Waters being vocal about Chauvin trial is 'utter nonsense'
President Biden and Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., putting pressure on the jury in the Derek Chauvin trial is "absolutely crazy," "Kudlow" host Larry Kudlow argued on Tuesday. Both the president and congresswoman spoke up about the case’s verdict before it even occurred, Waters pushing for more violence if the outcome did not meet expectations. LARRY KUDLOW: Maxine Waters calling for confrontation, President Biden praying the verdict is [right] is irresponsible – statements that, frankly, could be used in an appeal for jury tampering. Saying that the verdict should be appropriate, saying the verdict should be in the family, all this stuff is just utter nonsense. Biden is somewhat less clear, but he, too, putting pressure on the jury, they're putting pressure on the jury.
Crowds react with joy, wariness to verdict in Floyd’s death
It’s already hard as it is as a Black man in today’s society,” said Williams, standing with a date in the plaza near the White House renamed after Floyd’s death last May. “If this doesn’t go right, I don’t know how safe I will feel.”Then, the verdict came for former Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin: guilty on all counts . Jesse Jackson, who traveled to Minneapolis for the verdict, said in a telephone interview. Why should we be thankful when George Floyd doesn’t have his life or his future?” the Ethical Society of Police, which represents about 260 St. Louis officers, said in a statement. In Grand Rapids, which had some of Michigan’s worst violence after Floyd’s death, authorities placed concrete barriers around the police building before the verdict was announced.
The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill.
That is exactly where Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill finds himself in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, entering its sixth week and bringing daily controversy and scrutiny to every step taken in the courtroom. "This is an extremely stressful trial, as any murder trial is," Moriarty said. In 1997 he joined the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office, spending 10 years there and eventually serving as the chief deputy county attorney. During his time as chief judge, Cahill presided over one of Minnesota's problem-solving courts, which aims to prevent women on probation for prostitution charges from reoffending. Contributing: Tami Abdollah, USA TODAY; The Associated PressFollow N'dea Yancey-Bragg on Twitter: @NdeaYanceyBraggThis article originally appeared on USA TODAY: George Floyd: Who is Judge Peter Cahill in the Derek Chauvin trial?
Chauvin's guilty verdict is a major milestone in America's reckoning with racial justice
It had been almost seven years since the first Black Lives Matter protests, in the summer of 2014 following the killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown. It was then that activists first used the hashtag on social media: Black Lives Matter. (Justin Ide/Reuters)An August 2017 Harvard poll showed 43 percent approval for the Black Lives Matter movement and 57 percent disapproval. Trump also made the Black Lives Matter movement into a punching bag for his reelection campaign. (Doug Mills/New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images)Public opinion of the Black Lives Matter movement rose to a high point in the days after Floyd’s death.
USC football postpones practice after Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
In light of the guilty verdict in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the USC football team opted to postpone its spring practice Tuesday and dedicate its afternoon session to discussing racial injustice as a team. AdvertisementSeveral USC football players took part in protests last summer, as racial tensions erupted nationwide in the wake of George Floyd’s murder. In discussing their anger over Floyd’s death, a group of Black athletes at USC decided last June to form the United Black Student Athletes Assn. USC had responded by creating a Black Lives Matter action team, headed by former Los Angeles Sparks coach Julie Rousseau. “This is a time for actions, not words,” Bohn wrote in a statement on June 17.
In Minneapolis, Chauvin’s jury said George Floyd’s life mattered
So when the jury deliberated 10 hours, over two days, that fear crept in, even with Suffolk County’s top prosecutor. Millions saw the sickening footage of Chauvin’s knee resting so casually yet homicidally on Floyd’s neck. Chauvin looked like a man without a care in the world as he snuffed the life out of Floyd’s body. Derek Chauvin snuffed out Floyd’s life as if it were of no consequence whatsoever. Tuesday, a jury reached the decisive conclusion that George Floyd’s life mattered.
He’s guilty. Derek Chauvin lynched George Floyd. Does America value our lives now?
I took a breath in the name of George Floyd. George Floyd should still be here, instead of being made a martyr for social change. What does it mean, that it took the protests for George Floyd to even shine a light on the killing of Breonna Taylor who died by police before him? George Floyd was not the first. And even then, we held our breaths in fear to hear it, every molecule screaming, “George Floyd.” His name filled our lungs as our stomachs soured and we said our prayers.
1 verdict, 2 views: Democrats, Republicans have different take on what Derek Chauvin trial means
After George Floyd’s death in May 2020, Sinema said he should still be alive and that the video of his death was grounds for Chauvin’s arrest. Last year, he spoke of inequities within the nation’s criminal justice system and beyond, saying it required independent oversight to stop misconduct and discrimination. Our justice system is only as strong as those who demand accountability, and change is urgent. “That starts in Congress, where the Senate must do what the House did more than a month ago: pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. “Although nothing can bring George Floyd back, I hope this guilty verdict provides some form of comfort to his grieving family.
'A huge step in the right direction': With relief and tears, Milwaukee reacts to Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
"No matter the verdict, I still can’t exhale.”And when it came, Derek Chauvin found guilty on all charges in the death of George Floyd, Williams nodded and her eyes filled with tears. The verdict came like a thunderclap, sudden and shocking. For Nate Hamilton, the Chauvin trial brought back pain, stress, frustration and the memory of his brother, Dontre Hamilton. He said he hopes the verdict will push police departments across the country, including in Milwaukee, to stiffen their use-of-force policies. She was alone, left to pondering the verdict, and the legacy of Floyd and her son, under tragic circumstances.
Derek Chauvin found guilty on all 3 charges of killing George Floyd
Former Officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty on all charges in the death of George Floyd. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)In this image from police body camera video George Floyd responds to police after they approached his car outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis, on May 25, 2020. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s death.
Biden to US after Chauvin verdict: ‘We cant stop here’
President Joe Biden spoke Tuesday after former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter. President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and First Lady Jill Biden speak by phone with members of George Floyd's family after a guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial. (STN)President Joe Biden speaks Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the White House in Washington, after former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki repeatedly refused to explain Biden’s comments, doing nothing to dispel the impression that he thought Chauvin should be found guilty. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package.
Columbus police shooting updates: Aunt says teen girl killed; crowd protests
An angry crowd protested near a home on the Southeast Side where a Columbus police officer fatally shot someone while responding to an attempted stabbing call. Police received a 911 call at 4:35 p.m. about an attempted stabbing on the 3100 block of Legion Lane, which is located north of Chatterton Road. Hazel Bryant told The Dispatch that she is the aunt of the 15-year-old girl who was shot. The girl lived in a foster home there on Legion Lane and got into an altercation with someone else at the home, she said. Protests develop at shooting sceneProtesters with Black Lives Matter signs, megaphones and a loudspeaker joined the crowd gathered behind crime scene tape about a half-block away from the shooting scene.
‘Just the beginning’: joy and wariness as crowds celebrate Chauvin verdict
Literal dancing in the streets, Minneapolis pic.twitter.com/A2MK4RLE9C — Lois Beckett (@loisbeckett) April 20, 2021At the Minneapolis intersection where the Floyd died on 25 May, a vigil gave way to celebration as crowds began to course down the streets. Cheers, clapping and tears flowed through the streets of #GeorgeFloydSquare as Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts. People watch a news report on television as they learn of the verdict, in Houston’s Third Ward. Williams, who is Black, burst into tears and doubled over with emotion upon seeing the news of the verdict on his phone. In St Louis, a police association made up predominantly of Black officers called the verdict important but “a pebble in the ocean”.
Biden to America after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
But he declared that “it’s not enough.”Biden spoke from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair saying the country’s work is far from finished with the verdict. “We can’t stop here,” Biden declared. The White House had been privately weighing how to handle the verdict, dispatching specially trained community facilitators from the Justice Department in anticipation of potential protests, officials said. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict.
The damning police bodycam footage that found Derek Chauvin guilty of murder
On Tuesday Chauvin was found guilty on all counts - second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. MINNESOTA V DEREK CHAUVIN - CHARGES Second-degree murder - GUILTY Possible sentence: 12.5 to 40 years The second-degree murder charge required prosecutors to prove Chauvin caused Floyd's death while committing or trying to commit a felony — in this case, third-degree assault. Third-degree murder - GUILTY Possible sentence: 12.5 to 25 years Third-degree murder required a lower standard of proof than second-degree. The footage includes more than 18 minutes from Officer Alex Kueng's bodycam and 10 minutes from Officer Thomas Lane. AdvertisementAfter getting Floyd out of the car, Lane then starts talking to the passengers, Hill and Hall.
Sunny Hostin reacts to Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict
A tearful Sunny Hostin broke down on air after the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial as Fox News' Judge Jeanine Pirro said the decision proves that the 'American justice system works'. During a CNN panel, Van Jones (top left) joined Anderson Cooper and others to discuss the verdict on Tuesday. However, Lemon noted that there's 'a lot more to be done'The guilty verdict spread across headlines like wildfire on Tuesday with many covering the story similarly, including conservative-leaning sites like Fox News. When the final guilty verdict was announced, the crowd roared, many people hugging, some shedding tears. Eighteen-year-old Darnella Frazier, who shot the crucial video, said Chauvin just gave the bystanders a 'cold' and 'heartless' stare.
TOM LEONARD: Murder lit a touchpaper... now can the verdict end America's race turmoil?
Long before the verdict came through, Minneapolis was already a fortress city, battened down and steeling itself for the storm. On Monday the President had phoned Mr Floyd's family and said he was praying for them. The incident was filmed by witnesses who captured Mr Floyd's pleas that he couldn't breathe and appealed to the officers to let him up. Though the officers called for medical assistance, they took no action to treat him and Chauvin kept his knee on Mr Floyd's neck even as an ambulance crew arrived. And the crowd has been demanding racial justice since last May when video footage of Mr Floyd's slow death was condemned as a modern-day lynching.
Biden says George Floyd's death showed 'the knee on the neck of justice for black Americans'
He compared systemic racism he said permeates the nation to 'the knee on the neck of justice for black Americans.' 'Black Americans and black men in particular have been treated throughout the course of our history as less than human,' Harris said. 'We're going to hold you to that, President Biden,' Crump responded. The White House later claimed Biden wasn’t advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family. 'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.'
'At least now there's some justice,' Biden tells George Floyd's family after Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
WASHINGTON – President Joe Biden told George Floyd's family “at least there’s some justice now” in a phone call made by the president shortly after Wednesday's guilty verdict of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. "You're an incredible family," Biden added. Biden and Harris are scheduled to make public remarks about the Chauvin verdict Wednesday night. More:Derek Chauvin found guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd: Live updatesA Minneapolis jury Wednesday afternoon found Chauvin, 45, guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the murder of George Floyd last May. "You've got it pal," Biden said when Crump pushed for final passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which cleared the Democratic-controlled House in March.
‘More work to be done’: Chauvin murder conviction brings relief and resolve to keep fighting for justice in George Floyd's name
The emotions ran the gamut when news broke Tuesday that former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts in the murder last May of George Floyd. But perhaps most of all, people of color across the United States felt that, for a moment, they mattered. She said she was “very happy” about the verdict but warned a battle for equality still loomed. Since then calls for change have only become more strident given the growing list of people of color killed while interacting with law enforcement. Many civil rights advocates and Democratic lawmakers are pushing the Senate to pass the new George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.
Opinion | Derek Chauvin Is Guilty: ‘A Huge Nationwide Sigh of Relief’
To the Editor:Re “Derek Chauvin Guilty of Murder in George Floyd Death” (nytimes.com, April 20):On Tuesday afternoon the momentous decision in the Derek Chauvin trial was announced and the verdict was guilty on all three counts. With a country kept on tenterhooks for weeks, the announcement of a guilty verdict felt just as dramatic and cathartic as one might imagine, resulting in a huge nationwide sigh of relief. We as a nation can take solace in the likelihood that this verdict will defuse any spontaneous protests that might have otherwise devolved in rage, a rage causing violence and destruction. But let us not forget that a man, George Floyd, is dead and that this verdict does not bring him back to his family and loved ones. It is now incumbent upon all of us to turn this moment into a lasting movement that treats Black Americans as truly equal under the law.
Faced with protests, NY pols express relief at ‘justice’ after Chauvin guilty verdicts
New York elected officials greeted the trio of guilty verdicts against former Minnesota police officer Derek Chauvin with relief Tuesday — while the Big Apple braced itself for waves of possible protest following the trial’s end. “Today, justice was served,” wrote de Blasio. “Chauvin’s actions sullied an entire profession and enraged people of good will around the world,” she wrote. “Black Lives Matter. True justice would mean that George Floyd would have walked away from that encounter alive,” she wrote.
Derek Chauvin jurors' identities will be kept secret
The court has withheld the jurors’ identities facing safety concerns over what was one of the highest-profile police-involved homicide cases in decades. DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL JURORS: WHO ARE THEY? 55 is White woman in her 50s and an executive assistant in the health care industry. 92 is a White woman in her 40s who works in commercial insurance. 96 is an out-of-work White woman in her 50s was volunteering with the homeless and said she had witnessed police treat minorities worse than White people.
Opinion: Why I'm not celebrating
(CNN) Commentators weigh in on the guilty verdict against ex-Police Officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd last May. Issac Bailey: I'm relieved, but still in painI don't begrudge others who burst into celebration at the sound of "guilty" guilty" "guilty" in the case of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who slowly murdered George Floyd in broad daylight. There is consolation -- all because George Floyd received the justice he deserved. Julian ZelizerWith the Chauvin verdict, justice was achieved. Until then, there will not be full justice for George Floyd.
Globes group ousts member over his Black Lives Matter email
Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement” and described Cullors as a “self-proclaimed trained Marxist,” according to a report from the Los Angeles Times . The email was sent to HFPA members, staff and the group’s general counsel and chief operating officer. At the time, the group had 87 members who are journalists, but none are Black, the Times reported . ADVERTISEMENTThe organization has said that an “action plan” was under development to admit Black members.
Biden after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
Biden spoke from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair calling for Congress to act swiftly to address policing reform. Floyd family attorney Ben Crump posted video on Twitter of a phone call from Biden and Harris to the family. “They’re a good family and they’re calling for peace and tranquility no matter what that verdict is,” Biden said a few hours before the verdicts were announced. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki repeatedly refused to explain Biden’s comments, doing nothing to dispel the impression that he thought Chauvin should be found guilty. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package.
Crowds Erupt In Cheers In Minneapolis After Guilty Verdict
Crowds Erupt In Cheers In Minneapolis After Guilty VerdictEnlarge this image toggle caption Carlos Barria/Reuters Carlos Barria/ReutersCheers erupted from the large crowds gathered outside the Hennepin County Government Center on Tuesday after the jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty in the death of George Floyd. Guilty on all counts: unintentional second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The crowd spilled into the streets near the courthouse, with cars honking and demonstrators chanting and waving Black Lives Matter flags. Enlarge this image toggle caption Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty ImagesDowntown Minneapolis was the scene of "absolute jubilation," wrote Liz Sawyer of the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Claps and cheers went out when the guilty verdict came in.
Diversity consultant quits HFPA after NBC blasts 'racist rhetoric' email by ex-president
HFPA Vice President Helen Hoehne, left, HFPA Board Chair Meher Tatna and HFPA President Ali Sar address diversity at the 78th Golden Globe Awards on Feb. 28, 2021. (NBC)Shaun Harper, the diversity strategist hired by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. The HFPA did not respond to a request for comment. Harper’s departure comes on the same day that both NBC and Dick Clark Productions called for the ouster of HFPA member and former eight-term president Phil Berk. In a statement Tuesday, HFPA announced that Berk "is no longer a member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.”This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.
Globes group ousts member over his Black Lives Matter email
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A former president of the organization that hosts the Golden Globes has been dropped from the group’s board sending an email that called Black Lives Matter a “hate movement.”The Hollywood Foreign Press Association board said in an email Tuesday that Phil Berk is no longer a member of the organization. Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement” and described Cullors as a “self-proclaimed trained Marxist,” according to a report from the Los Angeles Times. At the time, the group had 87 members who are journalists, but none are Black, the Times reported. The organization has said that an “action plan” was under development to admit Black members.
Minneapolis Celebrates, Reflects After Derek Chauvin Guilty Verdict
The GuardianJudge says Waters’ comments could provide grounds for appealBiden tells reporters he’s ‘praying the verdict is the right verdict’ Waters during the protest in Brooklyn Center at the weekend. At the White House, the president told reporters he was “praying the verdict is the right verdict, which is, I think … it’s overwhelming, in my view”. Waters said she hoped Chauvin would be found “guilty, guilty, guilty”. If Chauvin was acquitted, she said, “we’ve got to stay on the street, and we’ve got to get more active. The Chauvin trial is at the center of national dialogue.
Philonise Floyd: 'Today we are able to breathe again'
Floyd’s brother, Philonise, was the only family member in court. He sat praying in the minutes before the verdict and was visibly shaking as it was announced. Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, said in a statement: “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America. “I would not call today’s verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration, but it is accountability which is the first step towards justice,” he said. Tobin said that when Floyd lost consciousness the level of oxygen in his lungs was well below half the normal amount.
Sports figures react to Derek Chauvin’s murder conviction with mix of joy and wariness
(Mike Ehrmann / Associated Press)The intersection of sports and social justice dates at least as far back as Jackie Robinson shattering baseball’s color barrier in 1947. More recently, Colin Kaepernick added fuel to a national debate when he took a knee during the national anthem. Black men, Black women, Black kids, we are terrified.”Mookie Betts led the way for the Dodgers, deciding to sit out a game in San Francisco. Advertisement× VIDEO | 01:55 Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd The jury in the trial of Derek Chauvin convicted the former Minneapolis police officer of murder in the death of George Floyd. Leagues such as the NHL and MLS sounded a similar note, the NBA vowing to keep working through the Social Justice Coalition that was formed in conjunction with the players union.
Diversity consultant quits HFPA after NBC blasts ‘racist rhetoric’ email by ex-president
Shaun Harper, the diversity strategist hired by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. The HFPA did not respond to a request for comment. Harper’s departure comes on the same day that both NBC and Dick Clark Productions called for the ouster of HFPA member and former eight-term president Phil Berk. Berk sent an email Sunday — criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors and likening BLM to a hate group — that touched off a firestorm among many of the organization’s members. In a statement Tuesday, HFPA announced that Berk “is no longer a member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.”
‘Justice has been served!’: LeBron James, Patrick Mahomes, others in the sports world react to the Derek Chauvin verdict
After Chauvin’s guilty verdict, many athletes and leagues took to social media to share their reactions to the decision. — Kia Nurse (@KayNurse11) April 20, 2021Justice and Accountability! ?????????? — Kevin Love (@kevinlove) April 20, 2021Justice served on all counts. — Tyasha Harris (@TyHarris_52) April 20, 2021?????? — Tyus Jones (@1Tyus) April 20, 2021JUSTICE. — LIQUID | Powerzsurge (@aerial_powers23) April 20, 2021justice ?? — Isaiah Roby (@roby_isaiah) April 20, 2021A screenshot from Dallas Mavericks guard Josh Richardson's Instagram story.
The jury got the Chauvin verdict right this time, but this should only be the beginning of police reform
It took a jury of seven women and five men 10 hours to find Chauvin guilty Tuesday on all counts in the murder. The jury got it right, but this is only the beginning. Chauvin killed Floyd and the world watched in horror, and now Chauvin faces decades behind bars. Officer Thomas Grady chased Bell and claimed that when he had Bell cornered, Bell lunged at him with a knife. If you watched the video, you saw Floyd die a slow, painful death.
Biden to Floyd family after verdict: ‘We’re all so relieved’
Biden said he hoped the verdict would give momentum to congressional police reform efforts. Floyd family attorney Ben Crump posted video on Twitter of a phone call from Biden and Harris to the family. Asked by a family member how he was doing, Biden said, “Feeling better now. “They’re a good family and they’re calling for peace and tranquility no matter what that verdict is,” Biden said a few hours before the verdicts were announced. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package.
Biden after Floyd verdict: ‘We can’t stop here’
Biden spoke from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair calling for Congress to act swiftly to address policing reform. “We can’t stop here.”Harris said, “A measure of justice isn’t the same as equal justice.”Biden spoke after telephoning Floyd’s family, telling them, “We’re all so relieved.”THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Biden said he hoped the verdict would give momentum to congressional police reform efforts. Floyd family attorney Ben Crump posted video on Twitter of a phone call from Biden and Harris to the family. With word that a verdict had been reached Tuesday afternoon, Biden postponed planned remarks at the White House on his infrastructure package.
'Relief, but not a celebration': LIers respond to Chauvin guilty verdict
Edward Chung of Valley Stream, 22, said the verdict felt like a validation of the nationwide protests that he participated in last summer. Chung joined protests on Long Island, and in Chicago, where he went to college. The pandemic has changed education on Long Island. "I feel a sense of relief, but not a celebration," said Tracey Edwards, the NAACP's Long Island regional director. She was glad to see Chauvin convicted, but she thought of the deaths of Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery.
Photos: Reaction to the Chauvin verdict from around the U.S.
Former Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted Tuesday of murder and manslaughter for pinning George Floyd to the pavement with his knee on the Black man’s neck in a case that touched off worldwide protests, violence and a furious reexamination of racism and policing in the U.S.People celebrate after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minn.London Williams, 31, of Harrisburg, Pa., bursts into tears on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Washington, after hearing that former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. AniYa A motions as she walks through Times Square in New York, while talking on her cell phone after a Minnesota jury found Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021. A person reacts on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Washington, at Black Lives Matter Plaza near the White House after the verdict in Minneapolis, in the murder trial against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was announced. People cheer after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minn.People cheer after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minn.People cheer after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minn.People cheer after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis,
George Floyd family on Derek Chauvin verdict: ‘We are able to breathe again’
George Floyd’s family members expressed gratitude and called for more change Tuesday, shortly after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering the Black man in 2020. We have to protest, because it seems like this is a never-ending cycle,” Philonise Floyd, George’s brother, said at a press conference. Chauvin’s killing of Floyd on May 25, 2020, sparked worldwide Black Lives Matter protests, and the trial was closely watched. “Today, we are able to breathe again,” Philonise Floyd said. Al Sharpton, called on Congress to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which has stalled in the Senate.
'Our system of justice worked': Ohio politicians praise 'bittersweet' verdict in Derek Chauvin trial
Ohio politicians praised the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial Tuesday evening, with Democrats calling for more accountability for police. As we go forward as a nation, we must learn from the tragic death of George Floyd." Congress should listen too, and pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act." Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes, D-Akron“I hope that George Floyd’s family, friends and loved ones can now begin to heal. State Sen. Sandra Williams, D-Cleveland“Today’s verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial is a bittersweet moment in the name of justice for George Floyd’s family and community.
Oklahoma activists, leaders react to guilty verdict in Derek Chauvin trial
Staff reportsA Minnesota jury found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May. Chauvin, 45, was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Oklahoma City activists and leaders responded to the Chauvin guilty verdicts Tuesday:Rev. I just hope that we can move the needle and people can start actually seeing that there's an issue, there's a problem. I think that there's, especially in Oklahoma, there's legislation to block any progress that's been made.
Biden after Floyd verdict: 'We can't stop here'
“I think the verdict just reinforces that our justice system continues to become more just,” said Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only Black Republican senator. “This is a monumental day in many ways, in my opinion.”The Congressional Black Caucus watched the verdict together in the Capitol, and members hugged and fist pumped after the verdict was read. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict. ... It’s a vindication of justice in America.”House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined the Black Caucus shortly afterward at a news conference outside, where she said she had spoken to Floyd’s family just before the verdict. “Because of you, and because of thousands, millions of people around the world who came out for justice, your name will always be synonymous with justice.”
Globes group ousts member over his Black Lives Matter email
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A former president of the organization that hosts the Golden Globes has been dropped from the group’s board sending an email that called Black Lives Matter a “hate movement.”The Hollywood Foreign Press Association board said in an email Tuesday that Phil Berk is no longer a member of the organization. The decision comes hours after NBC — which telecasts the Globes — condemned Berk’s actions and called for his “immediate expulsion.”The show's producer, dick clark productions, also demanded for Berk’s removal. Berk, an eight-term association president, fell under heavy scrutiny after he sent an email Sunday criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The South African-born Berk shared an article that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement” and described Cullors as a “self-proclaimed trained Marxist,” according to a report from the Los Angeles Times. The email was sent to HFPA members, staff and the group’s general counsel and chief operating officer.
Biden to Floyd family after verdict: 'We're all so relieved'
“I think the verdict just reinforces that our justice system continues to become more just,” said Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only Black Republican senator. “This is a monumental day in many ways, in my opinion.”The Congressional Black Caucus watched the verdict together in the Capitol, and members hugged and fist pumped after the verdict was read. “The room was filled with emotion and gratitude,” said Georgia Rep. Hank Johnson. And I’m very gratified at the verdict, very happy at the swiftness of the verdict. ... It’s a vindication of justice in America.”
Judge in Derek Chauvin trial is former prosecutor who built a reputation as a no-nonsense justice
Hennepin County Judge Peter CahillThe judge who oversaw Derek Chauvin's murder trial is known for his decisive and direct style, which he built through years of service as both a public defender and a prosecutor. Minnesota cop Chauvin was found guilty on Tuesday on all three charges - second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter - in the death of George Floyd. Cahill was appointed to the bench by Republican Governor Tim Pawlenty in 2007 and quickly built a reputation as a no-nonsense, fair justice. Third-degree murder - GUILTY Possible sentence: 12.5 to 25 years Third-degree murder required a lower standard of proof than second-degree. Before the trial Cahill won praise for standing firm on his decisions not to delay or move proceedings despite media attention.
Moment Biden and Kamala call George Floyd's family after Derek Chauvin was found guilty
'Feeling better now,' Biden told tearful family members and listeners who gathered around Philonise Floyd's phone. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. The White House later claimed Biden wasn’t advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family. 'I've come to know George's family,' Biden said as he added he 'can only imagine the pressure and anxiety they're feeling.' 'What bothered me so much was, they tried to frame that as violence,' Waters said.
'I'm in tears': Mariah Carey, Amanda Gorman, more stars react to Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
"George Floyd is still gone..and finally someone was responsible... Derek Chauvin," she continued. "Michelle and I send our prayers to the Floyd family, in the hopes that they may find peace," they continued. "today justice"Billie Eilish, Taylor Swift, Oprah, more celebrities react to the death of George Floyd: 'We must act'"THANK GOD," Cher tweeted. "Justice," wrote George Takei. George Floyd: Rapper Killer Mike urges people to organize, Nick Cannon joins in MinneapolisContributing: Grace Hauck, N'dea Yancey-Bragg, Tami Abdollah, Kevin McCoy, Eric Ferkenhoff
Opinion: Sports world came together in united front as we held our breath for Derek Chauvin verdict
But the verdict in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin was different. For once, there was justice, and it came in part thanks to a sports universe that united to fight for it. Chauvin was found guilty on all murder and manslaughter charges, and most of America, and the sports world, breathed a sigh of relief. The right thing happened after he was convicted of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The eyes of the world have been on the Derek Chauvin trial and now on the tragic death of Daunte Wright.
'This means everything': Minneapolis joyfully chants George Floyd's name after Derek Chauvin is found guilty of murder
MINNEAPOLIS — Silence fell across the courthouse lawn for a few moments as the verdicts were read against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. We need a guilty verdict. Opinion:Derek Chauvin is guilty of murdering George Floyd. Shut it down!” the crowd yelled repeated. George Floyd will never take a breath on this planet again,” he yelled.
NBA, players react to Derek Chauvin verdict: ‘Justice appears to have been served’
The videotaped final moments off Floyd’s life, last May 25, sparked protests around the globe, and particularly in the NBA. NBA commissioner Adam Silver and NBPA executive director Michele Roberts released a joint statement almost immediately after Tuesday’s verdict. “George Floyd’s murder was a flash point for how we look at race and justice in our country, and we are pleased that justice appears to have been served,” the statement read. Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death. The NBA had been on pause due to COVID-19, but when the league resumed play in its bubble, teams were allowed to don social justice slogans like “Equality” on their jerseys.
Nextdoor to alert users before they post something racist
The neighborhood-specific social platform has launched a feature — the “anti-racism notification” — that asks users to think again about posting content that the app deems offensive. NextdoorRegarding the anti-racism notification: An example of words and phrases that Nextdoor considers offensive include “All Lives Matter” and “Blue Lives Matter,” both of which are already regulated. “As a reminder, All Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter content is explicitly prohibited on Nextdoor when used to undermine racial equality or the Black Lives Matter movement,” the release says. “Support for White Lives Matter is prohibited on Nextdoor, as it is most commonly associated with white supremacist groups.”In a sense, it’s a warning to ensure users know that they may be in violation of Nextdoor’s discrimination policy. “Conversations on racial justice can be difficult, and they have a profound impact on our neighborhoods,” the blog post reads.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signs controversial ‘anti-riot’ bill
Ron DeSantis has signed into law an “anti-riot” aimed at cracking down on civil unrest — with provisions that include civil immunity to people who drive through protesters blocking roads. The controversial law was inked on Monday and goes into effect immediately, according to The Orlando Sentinel. Ron DeSantis signed a controversial “anti-riot” law for his state on April 20, 2021. “He wasn’t defending himself.”The bill also enhances penalties for crimes committed during riots or violent protests in the Sunshine State. It also adds language to state law that could force local governments to justify a reduction in law enforcement budgets.
Crowd reacts to Derek Chauvin trial outside courthouse
MINNEAPOLIS — Wild cheers erupted and tears flowed outside the courthouse Tuesday where former city cop Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all charges in the death of George Floyd. “The sun is out,” a 24-year-old Minneapolis woman told The Post moments after the verdict was announced to the crowd. Gianna Floyd, the daughter of George Floyd, is carried as she walks with family members outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on Monday, April 19, 2021, before the murder trial against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin advances to jury deliberations. Julio Cortez/AP Ben Crump, left, the attorney representing George Floyd's family, speaks during a news conference outside of the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on Monday, April 19, 2021. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Bridgett Floyd (R), sister of George Floyd, speaks to the media outside the Hennepin County Government Center where jury selection will take place in the trial of former officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, March 8, 2021.
Minneapolis Celebrates Derek Chauvin Guilty Verdict
Hundreds of people gathered in Minneapolis to celebrate the conviction of former police officer Derek Chauvin in the murder trial of George Floyd. Crowd is jubilant to hear of guilty verdict. Morry Gash via APPeople gather in Minneapolis, cheering after the guilty verdict was announced. Scott Olson via Getty ImagesPeople react after the verdict was read in Minneapolis. Sarah Silbiger via Getty ImagesA person celebrates the verdict at Black Lives Matter Plaza near the White House in Washington, D.C.Chip Somodevilla via Getty ImagesRep. Cori Bush (D-Mo.)
In Minneapolis, city fortified after Chauvin guilty verdict
A few steps away at the Iron Door Pub, three more National Guard soldiers and a Minneapolis police officer stood out front, watching the street. Chauvin was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Minnesota Governor Tim Walz faced withering criticism for not stepping in quicker to deploy the National Guard. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Crowds react with joy, wariness to verdict in Floyd’s death
Loud cheering erupted from Floyd’s family members watching in an adjacent courthouse room as the judge read the verdict to a city and nation on edge. Williams, who is Black, burst into tears and doubled over with emotion upon seeing the news of the verdict on his phone. As people rejoiced, law enforcement from Minneapolis to Portland, Oregon, prepared for any unrest in the hours to come. In Portland, Oregon, which has seen repeated protests and vandalism since Floyd’s death, the mayor declared a state of emergency Tuesday and put state police and the National Guard on standby to help local authorities with any unrest. ___Flaccus reported from Portland, Oregon.
Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s death
The now-fire white officer was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. In the wake of Floyd’s death, demonstrations and scattered violence broke out in Minneapolis, around the country and beyond. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s death. “It’s been nights I stayed up, apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more, and not physically interacting and not saving his life,” she said. ___Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd
The Latest: Lawmakers react to guilty verdict in Floyd case
Lawmakers from both parties are expressing satisfaction with Tuesday’s guilty verdict of former police officer Derek Chauvin for murder and manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd. __5 p.m.Former President Barack Obama says the conviction of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd was correct but only one step in the fight for justice. Crowds are celebrating near the Minneapolis courthouse where former police Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted Tuesday of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. When the final guilty verdict was announced, the crowd roared, many people hugging, some shedding tears. __3:50 p.m.At the Minneapolis intersection that has been dubbed George Floyd Square, about 100 people have gathered around a large painting of Floyd in anticipation of the verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin.
Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s death
Chauvin was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. In the wake of Floyd’s death, demonstrations and scattered violence broke out in Minneapolis, around the country and beyond. Eighteen-year-old Darnella Frazier, who shot the crucial video, said Chauvin just gave the bystanders a “cold” and “heartless” stare. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s death. He recalled how Floyd helped teach him to catch a football and made “the best banana mayonnaise sandwiches.”___Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd
Floyd family attorney Ben Crump says Derek Chauvin’s murder conviction is ‘painfully earned justice’ — here’s what gave him hope months earlier
... Once you’re a convicted felon that spent time in prison, I mean, it’s almost anything you can try to do to be gainfully employed. Nurses, you can’t get a nursing degree in many states if you’re a convicted felon. “ ‘If you are a convicted felon and you serve time in prison, you can’t even get life insurance. In fact, in many states, if you are a convicted felon and you serve time in prison, you can’t even get life insurance. It’s asinine you can’t even get a plumbing license if you’ve been a convicted felon.
Scottie Pippen Mourns Loss Of His Son Antron: 'Beautiful Soul Gone Way Too Soon'
He sat praying in the minutes before the verdict and was visibly shaking as it was announced. Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, said in a statement: “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America. “I would not call today’s verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration, but it is accountability which is the first step towards justice,” he said. The second-degree murder charge required the jury to find that Chauvin committed a crime by kneeling on Floyd’s neck, which in turn led to his death. Tobin said that when Floyd lost consciousness the level of oxygen in his lungs was well below half the normal amount.
Derek Chauvin verdict had Minneapolis businesses prepared to ‘hit the panic button’
A member of the National Guard patrols along Hennepin Avenue on April 16, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Joshua Lott/The Washington Post via Getty Images)One-hundred and forty Minneapolis businesses were affected by a “crime spree” over the last few weeks, Axios reported last week, and pharmacies and liquor stores have been frequent targets. Like other downtown businesses, we’re closely monitoring the trial and any surrounding activity,” a company spokesperson told Yahoo Finance. MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - APRIL 15: National guard soldier are posted on a street corner near downtown as the city prepares for reaction to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial on April 15, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, is standing trial for murder in the death of George Floyd.
‘No one is above the law’: Rhode Islanders react to conviction of Derek Chauvin in murder of George Floyd
“Our thoughts are with the Floyd family and the people of Minnesota. While I hope this verdict gives the Floyd family some peace, justice will not bring George back. We place a great deal of trust in our justice system and today saw justice served. The ensuing conversations and protests concerning our criminal justice system were raw and necessary, as we begin to address flaws in and reforms to that system. At the same time, the criminal justice system as is presently exists needed to deliver justice for Mr. Floyd and his family.
Derek Chauvin found guilty of murder, manslaughter in the death of George Floyd
Floyd family members who had gathered at a Minneapolis conference room could be heard cheering and even laughing. Chauvin was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. In the wake of Floyd’s death, demonstrations and scattered violence broke out in Minneapolis, around the country and beyond. Eighteen-year-old Darnella Frazier, who shot the crucial video, said Chauvin just gave the bystanders a “cold” and “heartless” stare. He recalled how Floyd helped teach him to catch a football and made “the best banana mayonnaise sandwiches.”
‘Not enough’: Dallas activists, elected officials say more still to be done after conviction of George Floyd’s killer
Dallas activists, religious leaders and elected officials celebrated after a Minneapolis jury found former police Officer Derek Chauvin guilty in the death of George Floyd but said the fight to change policing and improve racial justice was far from over. Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins praised the jury’s decision and said he hopes it will propel the conversation about justice in Dallas County. Last year, Floyd’s death set off a summer of national protests calling for racial justice and an end to police violence. “But today, the system worked.”A jury of Derek Chauvin’s peers has delivered justice in the only way that they could. In many ways of the nature of George Floyd’s death forced our hand to act in ways that our legal system otherwise would not.
Wisconsin community, political leaders react to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin case
Milwaukee Journal SentinelWisconsin activists, community leaders and politicians alike reacted to today's verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was charged in George Floyd's death last May. RELATED:Derek Chauvin jury reaches verdict in George Floyd's death: Live updatesRELATED:What are the charges against Derek Chauvin? Now here I am hearing the Derek Chauvin verdict and there is no joy in hearing "guilty." Derek Chauvin was not protecting or serving the residents of Minneapolis. I am encouraged that the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty, but their finding does not bring George Floyd back.
Wisconsin community, political leaders react to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin case
Milwaukee Journal SentinelWisconsin activists, community leaders and politicians alike reacted to today's verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was charged in George Floyd's death last May. RELATED:Derek Chauvin jury reaches verdict in George Floyd's death: Live updatesRELATED:What are the charges against Derek Chauvin? Now here I am hearing the Derek Chauvin verdict and there is no joy in hearing "guilty." Derek Chauvin was not protecting or serving the residents of Minneapolis. I am encouraged that the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty, but their finding does not bring George Floyd back.
In Minneapolis, city fortified after Derek Chauvin guilty verdict
“This city feels like it’s occupied by the military,” said Martinez, a commercial painter who lives in nearby St. Paul. Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Ex-cop Derek Chauvin convicted of murder, manslaughter in George Floyd’s death
Floyd family members who had gathered at a Minneapolis conference room could be heard cheering and even laughing. Chauvin was found guilty on all charges: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. In the wake of Floyd’s death, demonstrations and scattered violence broke out in Minneapolis, around the country and beyond. Eighteen-year-old Darnella Frazier, who shot the crucial video, said Chauvin just gave the bystanders a “cold” and “heartless” stare. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s death.
Illinois officials respond to Derek Chauvin verdict
George Floyd’s death sparked a pivotal movement for Americans fighting to end systematic racism. Let us pray that the Lord continues to watch over George Floyd’s family and loved ones. “While George Floyd was not the first unarmed Black man to die at the hands of police, his death galvanized Americans in a historic way. “My heart goes out to the family of George Floyd, who deserve to have him alive today. Derek Chauvin is now a convicted murderer, and bad actors like him have no place in law enforcement.”Ald.
Derek Chauvin guilty of all charges in George Floyd case
Former Officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty on all charges in the death of George Floyd. Former Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted Tuesday of murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s death.
Demonstrations planned on LI, in NYC after Chauvin guilty verdict
Nassau County Executive Laura Curran, in a statement, called it "an important step for justice in our nation." "The tragic murder of George Floyd rightfully spurred both outrage and action – including historic police reform here in Nassau County. Andrew M. Cuomo, who mandated police reforms for departments statewide in the aftermath of Floyd's killing, called the verdicts "a powerful statement of accountability." In addition to the largely peaceful protests in the aftermath of Floyd's killing, looters descended on Minneapolis, torching a police precinct and businesses. Chauvin and the other officers were fired from the police department in the days after Floyd’s killing.
George Floyd’s family, community reacts to guilty verdicts: ‘Painfully earned justice’
Tuesday’s verdict was “painfully earned justice” that will have implications for the rest of the country and the world, said Floyd family attorney Ben Crump. “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America,” he said in a statement. “There are no winners in this case and we respect the jury’s decision,” said a statement from the Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis. “We need the political pandering to stop and the race baiting of elected officials to stop. In addition, we need to stop the divisive comments and we all need to do better to create a Minneapolis we all love.”
'This country can rest tonight': Cincinnati reacts to Chauvin verdict
The EnquirerA Minnesota jury found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter Tuesday in the death of George Floyd last May. Iris Roley with the Cincinnati Black United Front said she's relieved at the verdict. Hamilton County Sheriff Charmaine McGuffey said the verdict is part of the healing process our country must endure. “I am excited that a guilty verdict was found. The defense argued underlying heart issues and the methamphetamine and fentanyl in his system caused Floyd's death while he struggled with police.
'Justice won': Detroit leaders, experts hail guilty verdicts for Chauvin
A jury deliberated for about 10 hours and found Chauvin guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The demonstrators in Detroit held handmade signs referencing Floyd and other African-Americans who died in police encounters in recent years. Detroit protests against police brutality started on May 29, four days after the death of Floyd. Detroit Will Breathe emerged to help lead the Detroit demonstrations, which included night-long marches throughout the city that remained mostly peaceful. In 2003, a U.S. Department of Justice investigation found a pattern of excessive force, civil rights abuses and a culture of covering up misconduct.
Small crowd gathers Downtown Columbus to celebrate Derek Chauvin verdict
By 6:30 p.m., what began as one lone man waving a "Black Lives Matter" flag had grown to a group of a little over a dozen, with more slowly joining the gather. People who were walking Downtown were pleased with the verdict, and motorists honked their horns in solidarity. Live updates:Derek Chauvin found guilty on all counts in the murder of George FloydLeanna Rocheleau, 34, was Downtown with her partner, 29-year-old Danielle Berger, when the verdict was announced. Rocheleau, who is white and a member of the LGBQT community, said she was hoping for a guilty verdict in support for the Black community, "a fellow marginalized community." Berkley, who lives Downtown, said he decided to go out and start waving his flag as soon as the verdict came in.
'This gives me some hope that we can get up this mountain': Richmonders react to verdict in Derek Chauvin trial
Minutes after a Minneapolis jury pronounced Derek Chauvin guilty on three counts, people gathered near the statue of Robert E. Lee on Richmond's Monument Avenue said justice had been served, 11 months after Chauvin killed George Floyd. Renee Hill said she came rushing to the monument with her elderly parents after hearing the verdict. Even in the moments before the verdict was announced, Hill questioned whether Chauvin would elude justice. "This gives me some hope that we can get up this mountain." In a statement, Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney said the verdict "makes it clear to everyone in America that Black lives matter."
Louisville and Kentucky leaders react to verdict in Derek Chauvin trial
Her death attracted international attention following the killing of Floyd, which sparked protests around the nation last summer. What their policy allowsSadiqa Reynolds, Louisville Urban League president"I do not have the words to express the relief I feel. The Louisville Urban League issued a subsequent statement, calling the verdict a relief but saying more work needs to be done. But for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and countless souls taken before their time, justice is about tomorrow. Our hope must be that the trajectory of these tragedies doesn’t define us or lead us into despair and cynicism.
Democrats block Republican resolution to censure Maxine Waters over Chauvin comments – as it happened
22:13Derek Chauvin has been convicted of murder for killing George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes, a crime that prompted a wave of protests in support of racial justice in the US and across the world. The jury swiftly and unanimously convicted Chauvin of all the charges he faced - second and third degree murder, and manslaughter - after concluding that the white former Minneapolis police officer killed the 46-year-old Black man through a criminal assault by pinning him to the ground so he could not breathe properly. A lack of oxygen in turn caused brain damage, heart failure and death, in May last year. Chauvin faces up to 40 years in prison, but is likely to receive a shorter sentence according to legal guidelines. The conviction does not put an end to the highly charged case, which reinvigorated the Black Lives Matter movement, as three other officers face trial later this year accused of aiding and abetting murder and manslaughter.
Will the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict change policing in America?
The jury’s guilty verdict on the former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for killing George Floyd signaled the conclusion of a historic police brutality trial and a key moment for policing and for the battle for racial equality in America. It inspired marches and largely peaceful protests coast to coast, from small towns in rural areas to America’s biggest cities. After Medaria Arradondo, the Minneapolis police chief, saw the viral bystander video of Floyd’s death, things moved quickly. There has been no revolution in racial justice or policing in the US since George Floyd was killed on 25 May 2020. But there has been progress and George Floyd’s terrible death reverberated so comprehensively around the world that even if there are setbacks or slow-marching by conservatives, the direction is forwards.
In life, George Floyd struggled to find his place. In death, everyone knows his name
George Floyd, a black man killed with a white policeman’s knee on his neck, has become a parable in America’s aching racial story that has resonated far beyond Minnesota. A childhood marked by povertyMr Floyd grew up in Houston, Texas, coming of age in the Cuney Homes housing estate in the city’s gritty Third Ward. When he was not at school, he would hang out with friends at nearby Emancipation Park. At his funeral in Houston last June, childhood friends told of his struggle to pull himself up out of its grinding poverty. “We were black and poor,” one old friend told The Telegraph.
Derek Chauvin verdict: What the Derek Chauvin verdict means for Minneapolis
The defence, meanwhile, suggested Mr Floyd’s underlying health conditions and drug use ultimately killed him, not the knee on his neck. Mr Chauvin even reached for his mace at one point in an apparent effort to ward her off. Notably absent was any testimony from Mr Chauvin himself, who declined to testify, and remained silent and withdrawn as the verdict was announced on Tuesday. “It looks like he was probably on something.”In another clip, during the arrest itself, Mr Chauvin can be heard casting doubt that Mr Floyd really wasn’t able to breathe. Charles McMillian, one of the bystanders who watched Mr Floyd die, said he recognized Mr Chauvin from previous patrols in the neighborhood.
Derek Chauvin found guilty on all murder charges
Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, has been found guilty on all three charges he was faced with. Mr Floyd pleaded for air and told officers he couldn’t breathe 27 times, as three officers held him down until he lost consciousness and didn’t have a pulse. They only removed themselves minutes later once paramedics arrived and lifted Mr Floyd’s limp body onto a stretcher. During closing arguments on Monday 19 April, prosecutor Steve Schleicher said that Chauvin ignored his police training and, as a result, killed Mr Floyd. Governor Walz noted in his statement that true justice for Mr Floyd only comes through real, systemic change to prevent this from happening again.
Black lawmakers revive calls for justice for victims of police violence after Chauvin verdict
Members of the Congressional Black Caucus revived their calls for justice for the victims of police violence and urged passage of sweeping police reform legislation backed by the White House following Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdicts for the killing of George Floyd. “This is just the first step,” said Caucus chair Joyce Beatty, surrounded by lawmakers at the Capitol on Tuesday. “Thank God the jury validated what we saw.”Now-former Minneapolis police officer Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Justice for us is saving lives.”Joe Biden’s administration supports the passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act – which could face stiff opposition from Republicans in the Senate. Lawmakers are mulling bipartisan compromise legislation in the Senate, where it will need 60 votes to pass.
Why the Chauvin trial ‘exhausts’ black America
The Derek Chauvin trial in Minneapolis is triggering fresh trauma for many Black Americans who have seen their pain televised in countless viral videos. Recording of police brutality has led to action in cases like George Floyd’s but comes at an emotional cost for many. The BBC’s Larry Madowo has been speaking to activists in Minneapolis about Black exhaustion and why the Black Lives Matter movement is also a heavy burden for them. Produced by Larry Madowo, Koralie Barrau and Ian Cartwright.
Derek Chauvin is guilty of murder. This is the beginning, not the end
That’s why the conviction of Derek Chauvin is a surprise: He was found guilty on all murder charges today and now faces up to 40 years in prison. The conviction of Chauvin won’t bring George Floyd back. It won’t prevent white officers from killing more Black people, either. Take the case of Black officer Cariol Horne, who was fired in 2008 for intervening when another officer used a chokehold on a handcuffed suspect, as one example. This verdict is the beginning, not the end, of a movement that calls for the police to accept the humanity of the Black people they have failed for far too long.
How the Left repeatedly tried to derail Chauvin's trial
AdvertisementDemocrats repeatedly threatened to derail Derek Chauvin's murder trial by ignoring the judge's order to stop talking about it because their comments could influence the jury. Cahill denied Nelson’s move for a mistrial but he said: 'I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case. Judge Cahill agreed with Nelson that the timing of the payout was a complicating factor. 'I've asked Minneapolis to stop talking about it - they keep talking about it, we keep talking about it,' he said. 'Everyone just needs to stop talking about it.
How George Floyd's death exposed the cracks in BLM
Questions of spending arose earlier this year after tens of millions of dollars were raised following Floyd's death. Both she and the main organization say that the vast majority of funds have not been spent yet. I can’t say yet that we can prove it’s a terrorist organization. It's certainly a violent organization and I believe in the course of time it will be shown to be a terrorist organization,' he said. 'Donations to BLM are restricted donations to support the activities of BLM,' a spokesman for the charity told Politifact last year.
Rick Scott blasts 'woke corporate America' over Georgia voting law changes and warns of 'backlash'
Senator Rick Scott took aim at ‘woke corporate America’ on Tuesday in a scathing letter condemning corporations opposed to changes to Georgia's voting laws. ‘You know that the Georgia law actually expands early voting and does nothing to suppress or curtail the voting rights of anyone,’ according to Scott. ‘And yes, the Georgia law requires an ID to vote. Georgia's big corporates come out against new voting law Coca-Cola President of North America Alfredo Rivera said the soft drink giant disappointed by the law. The law also reduces the timeframe in which runoff elections are held, including the amount of early voting for runoffs.
Cities across the US cheer Derek Chauvin guilty verdict for murdering George Floyd
AdvertisementPeople across the United States celebrated on Tuesday as Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd after cities across the country had been on high alert for protests in the case of a not guilty verdict. Hundreds of people who had gathered outside a courthouse in Minneapolis could be heard inside as they cheered when the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty in the murder of George Floyd. Cities across the United States are on high alert in the wake of the Derek Chauvin 's murder trial. The 12-person jury found Chauvin guilty on all counts Monday afternoon after just 10 hours of deliberationsPortland Mayor Ted called for calm. Elsewhere, tens of thousands of New Yorkers are planning to hit the streets for demonstrations in spite of the guilty verdict.
Derek Chauvin Guilty On All Counts—Our Fight For Racial Justice Continues
This case was about accountability, and Derek Chauvin was found guilty for his actions that resulted in the death of George Floyd. Our fight for racial justice continues as we fight to fundamentally alter a system that continues to threaten, harm, and kill Black people. Yes 4 Minneapolis has led the charge to keep a national spotlight on racial justice and issues with policing in this country. Color Of Change is all in for the fight for justice and will continue to advocate for systemic change. “Also, we need to hold our elected officials accountable in this moment to prioritize racial justice and addressing systemic change on the local and national level.
Chauvin Guilty on All Counts, Including Murder of George Floyd
After deliberating for just over 10 hours, the jury in the trial of Derek Chauvin found the former Minneapolis police officer guilty for the murder of unarmed Black man George Floyd last May. Chauvin—who was charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter—was found guilty on all counts. True justice would mean George Floyd was never killed in the first place. "The Chauvin trial has not stopped the now-familiar cycle of police committing harm, then responding to demands for justice with more violence," it added. The Chauvin trial may be over, but what comes next will be the consequential moment in our history.
A Colorado judge admitted saying the n-word and 'all lives matter' while at work
The investigation found that this wasn’t the only time Chase made offensive comments in front of colleagues and court employees. According to CNN, days after the death of George Floyd, two Black court employees were talking about Black Lives Matter protests when Chase heard and used the slogan “all lives matter.”"One of them asked the other if they had seen the George Floyd protests," the order said. "Judge Chase then, while wearing her robe and sitting on the bench, told the employees some of her opinions regarding racial justice issues. But her use of offensive language and expressing her biased political opinions while at work were not the only issues. Public censure of a Colorado judge is extremely rare and has only happened four times between 2010 and 2020, the Denver Post reported.
Maxine Waters and Marjorie Taylor Greene offer a lesson on where Kevin McCarthy draws the line
But calling for protest if a killer is acquitted because he was a police officer and his victim was Black—that’s a bridge too far! While McCarthy has stepped up to lead the attack on Waters, Greene has had problems of her own. That was a bridge too far for even the most extremist Republicans to publicly go at this point, it turned out. America First policies will save this country for all of us, our children, and ultimately the world.”America First America First America First Trump America First … but that Anglo-Saxon stuff? And what Greene really, really wants to talk about is, of course, Maxine Waters, who she uses as an in to attacking Black Lives Matter protesters more generally.
Chauvin defense calls for mistrial after Maxine Waters relays hoped-for verdict. Then, Biden does it
"Their failure to do so, I think, is abhorrent, but I don't think it's prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury." x GEORGE FLOYD MURDER TRIAL JUDGE calls Maxine Waters comments "abhorrent," and says her remarks could be cause for an appeal after the trial verdict. Maxine Waters was under fire days ago when she encouraged her constituents to pressure jurors to ensure Derek Chauvin is convicted. “I don’t think he would see it as weighing in on the verdict,” Psaki said. And he noted that in his comments as well.”RELATED: 'Impeach and remove Maxine Waters': New York Post condemns Democrat, not police, as violentRELATED: Republicans threaten to (try to) expel Rep. Maxine Waters from House over Black Lives Matter support
Ilhan Omar Blasts Democrats Over Hypocrisy in Funding Police vs Social Programs
Calling for “policies that move us forward,” Omar said, “the current policing system that we have is not doing anything to protect and serve. https://t.co/WnMueC1sKt — NowThis (@nowthisnews) April 20, 2021At the press conference, Omar also expressed frustration over the political stalemates that are plaguing Congress and blocking progress. I am tired [of] people talking about the narrow margins we have in the Senate,” Omar said. Police reform, a concept preferred by centrist Democrats, often gives more power, resources and money to police, which ends up perpetuating the cycle. As Ocasio-Cortez explained last year, the change that Omar is calling for isn’t as far from reality as centrists and Republicans might claim.
Vox claims Black Lives Matter protests lead to fewer police killings, downplays huge murder increase
Vox reported on PhD student Travis Campbell's research tracking 1,600 BLM protests, which found there were roughly 1,000 to 6,000 more murders in areas that experienced BLM protests, more than offsetting the apparent reduction in police killings. Vox had tweeted out the finding about the reduced police killings at least four times as of Tuesday afternoon, while not mentioning the alarming finding on increased murders. "We don’t know why BLM protests correlated with an increase in the murder rate, and there’s not a lot of research in this space to help guide us," Vox reporter Jerusalem Demsas wrote. "Additionally, Campbell’s research question was focused on the effect of BLM protests on police homicides, so these other observed changes regarding other homicides were not subjected to the same robustness tests." JASON WHITLOCK: TWITTER TARGETED ME OVER BLACK LIVES MATTER CRITICISM AS MESSAGE TO OTHER SPORTS JOURNALISTSConservative critics on Twitter hammered the publication for hiding the murder number.
Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts, jury decides
SEE NEW POSTSDerek Chauvin guilty on all counts, jury decides Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty on charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Floyd’s death sparked international protests against systemic racism and police violence after bystander video of the encounter was shared online. Chauvin, a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis Police Department, was fired along with three other officers following Floyd’s death. The top charge of second-degree murder carried the highest potential penalty, up to 40 years in prison. Share this -Derek Chauvin arrives at courthouse Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin has arrived at the Minneapolis courthouse with his attorney, Eric Nelson.
Crowds flock to Minneapolis courthouse ahead of verdict
We’re here with hope that things can turn around.”Amy Powers, 55, a retired firefighter, said this verdict will have an impact well beyond the borders of Minneapolis or Hennepin County. MINNEAPOLIS - The curious and the concerned flocked to the Hennepin County District Courthouse on Tuesday, to be outside when jurors announce their verdict in former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin's trial. All eyes are on the trial of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin on Tuesday as Americans await the reading of the jury's verdict on whether he bears responsibility for George Floyd's death. The second-degree murder charge carries the highest potential penalty, up to 40 years in prison. The state's team argued Floyd died because Chauvin knelt on his neck for 9½ minutes as he was handcuffed on the ground.
Derek Chauvin found guilty on all charges of murdering George Floyd: Athletes react
Derek Chauvin, right, was convicted on all three counts in George Floyd's death. (Court TV via AP, Pool)Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd on Tuesday. Prior to Floyd's death, Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes outside of a Minneapolis market as Floyd repeatedly pleaded "I can't breathe." This content is not available due to your privacy preferences. This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Derek Chauvin found guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd
After less than 24 hours of deliberations, the jury returned guilty verdicts against Chauvin, finding him guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd on May 25, 2020. Under Minnesota law, Chauvin can appeal his conviction after the court enters the judgement and Chauvin receives his sentence. Chauvin was accused of murdering Floyd by keeping his knee on Floyd’s neck — depriving Floyd of oxygen — during an arrest on May 25, 2020. Derek Chauvin and George Floyd. “I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty,” Waters said Saturday in response to a reporter’s question.
Golden Globes group distances itself from former president's email labeling Black Lives Matter a 'racist hate movement'
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which each year puts on the Golden Globe Awards, is distancing itself from a controversial email sent by its former president about the Black Lives Matter movement. The Los Angeles Times revealed that Phil Berk, who was the HFPA's president for eight terms, sent an email to members of the association on Sunday sharing a post that labeled Black Lives Matter a "racist hate movement." The email reportedly drew backlash from HFPA members, one of whom wrote back, "Please remove me from any racist email you wish to send to the membership." The Hollywood Foreign Press Association faced heavy criticism in the lead-up to this year's Golden Globes after a report revealed its voting body doesn't consist of a single Black member. Update: The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced on Tuesday it has now expelled Berk from the organization.
Ex-HFPA President Reportedly Called Black Lives Matter a ‘Racist Hate Movement’ in Leaked Email
Berk, notably, served eight terms as the president of the non-profit organization that annually conducts the Golden Globe Awards. The post shared in the email is said to have also mentioned Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors in a similarly disparaging manner. Recipients of the email reportedly included HFPA members, staff, general counsel, and COO Gregory Goeckner. The Times report, however, explained that the email seemingly pulled from a recent article on conservative figure David Horowitz’s website. The report also said the email in question was condemned in the ensuing thread by other members, with several criticizing it as racist.
A fortified Minneapolis awaits Chauvin verdict
A few steps away at the Iron Door Pub, three more National Guard soldiers and a Minneapolis police officer stood out front, watching the street. “This city feels like it’s occupied by the military,” said Martinez, a commercial painter who lives in nearby St. Paul. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Minnesota Governor Tim Walz faced withering criticism for not stepping in quicker to deploy the National Guard. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Derek Chauvin found guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd: Live updates
MINNEAPOLIS — The jury has found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May. Chauvin, 45, was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Dozens gather in George Floyd Square, outside courthouseIn George Floyd Square, dozens of journalists gathered outside the Cup Foods store where Floyd died last Memorial Day. We need a guilty verdict. We need a guilty verdict."
Derek Chauvin found guilty of George Floyd’s murder
Derek Chauvin has been convicted of murder for killing George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes, a crime that prompted a wave of protests in support of racial justice in the US and across the world. A lack of oxygen in turn caused brain damage, heart failure and death, in May last year. Chauvin faces up to 40 years in prison, but is likely to receive a shorter sentence according to legal guidelines. The doctor said Floyd’s leg can be seen kicking out which is a sign of a myotonic seizure caused by lack of oxygen. Tobin said that when Floyd lost consciousness the level of oxygen in his lungs was well below half the normal amount.
Hakeem Jeffries tells GOP to 'sit this one out' on Maxine Waters
Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, the No. 5 Democrat in the House, told GOP House Leader Kevin McCarthy that 'he should sit this one out' as McCarthy and Republicans gear up to censure Rep. Maxine Waters. Clean up your mess, Kevin. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries said House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy should 'sit this one out' as he attempt to censure Rep. Maxine Waters over comments she made at a protest in Minneapolis Saturday. 'Why is Maxine Waters traveling to a different state trying to incite a riot?
Derek Chauvin: Ilhan Omar says trial 'feels like a closed case' BEFORE verdict
Ilhan Omar called the murder trial against Derek Chauvin a 'closed case' on Tuesday as the jury is sequestered for deliberation. Wright was killed just around 10 miles from Minneaplois, where George Floyd was killed last may by officer Derek Chauvin. Which is – I think it's overwhelming in my view,' Biden told reporters in the Oval office. The White House later claimed Biden wasn't advocating for a particular verdict but expressing compassion for the Floyd family. 'What bothered me so much was, they tried to frame that as violence,' Waters said.
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy moves to censure Maxine Waters over 'inciting' comments
House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy moved Tuesday to formally censure Rep. Maxine Waters for her comments urging protesters to 'get more confrontational' depending on the outcome of the Derek Chauvin trial. McCarthy tweeted out the resolution, writing: 'Chairwoman Waters' actions are beneath the dignity of this institution. Waters, 82, climbed to her prized position under the seniority system in the House with the blessing of the House Speaker and the House Steering Committee. The White House on Tuesday got pressed repeatedly on Waters, and Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Waters had 'clarified' her comments. He then accused House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of 'ignoring Waters' behavior,' which he said prompted him to introduce 'a resolution to censure Rep.
Investors bet that ESG funds can make them money and help the planet: 'You don't have to leave your values at the door'
Why ESG investing is boomingInvestors poured record amounts of money into ESG funds in 2020, to the tune of more than $51 billion, according to Morningstar. The number of ESG funds available also grew to more than 390 last year. "I do think ESG investing helps make the world a better place for everyone. We're all in this together," says Sierra Wagner, a 38-year-old yoga instructor in California who invests in ESG funds. Many of the best performing and most popular ESG funds hold stocks that some investors find confusing.
Derek Chauvin's trial shows police reform needs to come from cops
The nation is currently fixated on the murder trial of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin. the fact that we are even at this point, with Chauvin on trial, is sadly quite remarkable. This is one of the rare instances where an officer is, in fact, on trial. So again, the fact that we are even at this point, with Chauvin on trial, is sadly quite remarkable. While we have yet to see what the results of the Chauvin trial will be, this moment feels deeply consequential.
Activists Pressure Corporate Boards to Address Racial Justice, Voting Laws
Shareholder groups are pushing corporate boards to do more about racial justice, with the latest salvo coming from advocacy group Majority Action and the Service Employees International Union, in an open letter published as a full-page advertisement in the Financial Times Tuesday. The letter is signed by more than 140 racial justice leaders, including NAACP President Derrick Johnson; Color of Change President Rashad Robinson; Rev. One big ask: third-party audits to see how companies are promoting racial equity in the workplace. For example, SEIU withdrew a resolution urging BlackRock to conduct a racial-equity audit after the money manager agreed to do so. Other Georgia-based companies like Coca-Cola (KO) and Delta Air Lines (DAL) have spoken out against the new voting law.
LAPD halts use of some projectile weapons at protests in court win for BLM Los Angeles
The Los Angeles Police Department has issued an immediate moratorium on the use of certain projectile weapons at protests after city attorneys interpreted a federal court order as precluding their use under current policies, LAPD Chief Michel Moore said Tuesday. Police have said they have used the weapons when crowds grew unruly and dangerous and officers were targeted with bottles, rocks and other objects. The activist groups had argued that the LAPD violated its own policies for such weapons and badly injured protesters last year. They have also argued that the LAPD continued using such weapons in dangerous ways at more recent protests. Moore said other restrictions under the order were already consistent with LAPD policy, such as not aiming projectiles at people’s heads or faces.
Death of George Floyd: Chauvin jury has reached a verdict
By Eric Levenson and Aaron Cooper | CNNA verdict has been reached in Derek Chauvin’s trial in the death of George Floyd, according to a notice posted by the court on the Hennepin County Court’s website. Chauvin, 45, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Prosecutors have repeatedly told jurors to “believe your eyes” and rely on the infamous bystander video of Floyd’s death. The second-degree murder charge says Chauvin intentionally assaulted Floyd with his knee, which unintentionally caused Floyd’s death. If convicted, Chauvin could face up to 40 years in prison for second-degree murder, up to 25 years for third-degree murder and up to 10 years for second-degree manslaughter.
How was George Floyd killed?
The jury is deliberating the verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the white former Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man. The clerk asked him to return the cigarettes, but Mr Floyd refused, and seemed “drunk and not in control of himself,” according to 911 logs. Read more:Four officers – Mr Chauvin, plus Tou Thao , and new recruits Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng – arrived at the scene. Police said they found Mr Floyd sitting on his car, where he appeared intoxicated and resisted arrest. Friends and family described Mr Floyd, a former high school sports star known by nicknames like Big Floyd and Big Friendly, as an amiable, gentle man, despite his imposing, 6’7” build.
Cruz says Waters wants more 'firebombing and looting' because it serves her political interests
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz blasted Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters for saying in Minneapolis Saturday that Black Lives Matter protesters should 'get more confrontational' if officer Derek Chauvin is found not guilty. Cruz said the problem was bigger than just Waters, who hasn't been publicly reprimanded by fellow Democrats. 'And the dirty little secret is, as bad as Maxine Waters comments were, they're not an outlier in the Democratic Party,' Cruz continued. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. 'Why is Maxine Waters traveling to a different state trying to incite a riot?
AOC, Markey reintroduce Green New Deal proposal aimed at climate change, economic injustice
WASHINGTON – Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey have reintroduced the Green New Deal, the sweeping climate change and economic justice plan that Republicans have used to paint Democrats as radical socialists. The reintroduction of the measure comes the same week President Joe Biden will host 40 world leaders for a virtual climate summit on Thursday and Friday. Republicans routinely ridiculed the Green New Deal in the past, calling it a social "manifesto" that showed how out of touch Democrats are. No senators, including all Democrats, voted for the resolution in what Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called a "sham" process. Both Markey and Ocasio-Cortez said the Biden plan doesn't go far enough though they acknowledged it's a start that has incorporated some progressive ideas.
Ilhan Omar demands ‘transformational change’ at site of Daunte Wright killing
“Where we continue to find ourselves in a state of mourning, in a state of exhaustion, in a state of trauma, and constantly seeing so much pain unearthed every single day,” she said. Omar denounced police violence at the intersection where Kimberly Potter shot and killed Daunte Wright. AFP via Getty Images“I know that we’ve been asking for accountability, we’ve been asking for transparency,” Omar said. “We’ve been asking for transformational change.”“And I know to me that Black Lives Matter is not a hashtag and should never be just a hashtag,” she said. “Our communities are tired and exhausted,” Omar remarked on the number of police killings.
Opinion | Welcome to the age of brutal activist Republican governance
Story continues below advertisementThis impulse is emerging in many areas, but let’s begin with a law Florida Gov. “There’s just nothing even close.”Story continues below advertisementHe may be right, but you can bet other Republican states will take it as a model. As the sheriff of Polk County said at the news conference while DeSantis stood laughing beside him, “Welcome to Florida. That is the day Republicans will take back the Senate and the House. AdvertisementWhat we can say is that the authoritarian impulses in the GOP were not confined to Donald Trump.
Chauvin's murder trial ends. The waiting begins.
Chauvin's murder trial ends. Monday’s closing arguments in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial strayed little from the central themes made over the past three weeks. THE BIG STORYLeading members of the Sikh community gather in prayer at Monument Circle on April 18 in Indianapolis. We have a huge proportion of members of the Sikh community who hail from South Asia, specifically from Punjab. You know, Black women matter, Black families matter, Black joy matters, incarceration matters, Black filmmakers matter.
What We Know About The Jurors In The Chauvin Trial
What We Know About The Jurors In The Chauvin TrialEnlarge this image toggle caption Court TV/Pool via AP Court TV/Pool via APClosing statements concluded Monday afternoon in the trial of ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. "I don't believe that the organization Black Lives Matter necessarily stands for that." She also said she believes the Black Lives Matter movement, along with Blue Lives Matter, has turned into a disingenuous marketing scheme for corporations. The juror also said he felt somewhat supportive of both Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter. 92: White woman, 40sShe said she works in communications and has been with the same company for 15 years.
After ‘racist rhetoric,’ NBC and Dick Clark Productions call on HFPA to oust ex-president
NBC and Dick Clark Productions, the broadcast network and producing partner of the Golden Globes, have asked the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. AdvertisementIn an internal email sent by DCP, the company told employees, “We unequivocally condemn the actions and words of a member of the HFPA. We are disgusted by the racist rhetoric disseminated by a member yesterday. We were encouraged by the very strong statements the HFPA previously made around improving their organization around issues of racial reform and equity. The Berk email, however, displayed a “very blatant exhibition of racism,” and the company felt it needed to say something publicly, the person said.
Lightfoot warns looters poised to take advantage of Chauvin verdict: ‘Don’t test us.’
… Don’t test us, because we are ready,” Lightfoot told reporters. My earliest memories are very seared by the then-Ohio governor calling in the National Guard to Kent State and the result was four students dead. Calling in the National Guard is a very serious matter. Having said that, Lightfoot acknowledged Tuesday that Pritzker has activated the National Guard at her request several times when the public didn’t know about it. We had the National Guard on standby.
George Floyd killing: President Joe Biden 'praying verdict is right verdict' in Derek Chauvin trial
President Joe Biden is "praying the verdict is the right verdict" in the trial of the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd. As the jury on Tuesday met for a second day of deliberations in the trial of Derek Chauvin, Mr Biden confirmed he had spoken to Mr Floyd's family. "I'm praying the verdict is the right verdict, which is - I think it's overwhelming in my view. Mr Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd, had revealed that Mr Biden called his family on Monday. Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter.
Maxine Waters presides over committee hearing as Republicans bid to get her kicked off
Rep. Maxine Waters presided over a House Financial Services Committee hearing Tuesday from the powerful committee perch she holds even as Republicans threaten to try to yank her assignments, censure her, or even throw her out of Congress. Waters, 82, climbed to her prized position under the seniority system in the House with the blessing of the House Speaker and the House Steering Committee. The White House on Tuesday got pressed repeatedly on Waters, and Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Waters had 'clarified' her comments. 'And the dirty little secret is, as bad as Maxine Waters comments were, they're not an outlier in the Democratic Party,' Cruz continued. 'Why is Maxine Waters traveling to a different state trying to incite a riot?
Billions spent on COVID-19 fight, but what happens next?
Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the past decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Health departments carry out essential government functions — such as managing water safety, issuing death certificates, tracking sexually transmitted diseases and preparing for infectious outbreaks. Compounding those losses, the coronavirus pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion.
HFPA responds to former president’s email criticizing Black Lives Matter movement
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has issued a statement following an email sent by its former president calling the Black Lives Matter organization “a hate movement.”The L.A. Times published an article on Monday detailing the email, which was reportedly sent on Sunday. In response to the Times article and Berk’s email, the HFPA board sent Variety the following statement: “Since its inception, the HFPA has dedicated itself to bridging cultural connections and creating further understanding of different backgrounds through film and TV. Berk’s email comes just under two months after controversy surrounding the diversity of the HFPA’s membership, after it came to light that the group had not contained any Black members in over two decades. The HFPA also came under fire for paying large sums to members for serving on committees and accepting lavish junket trips. The HFPA has since committed to add at least 13 Black members to its ranks.
In Minneapolis, a fortified city awaits Chauvin verdict
A few steps away at the Iron Door Pub, three more National Guard soldiers and a Minneapolis police officer stood out front, watching the street. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Minnesota Governor Tim Walz faced withering criticism for not stepping in quicker to deploy the National Guard. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
With Chauvin verdict looming, police departments brace for potential demonstrations
The death of George Floyd in police custody last May sparked protests across the country for much of the summer. Police departments across the country, such as those in Minneapolis, Philadelphia and New York, told Yahoo News they’ve been monitoring the trial and anticipating potential demonstrations after the verdict. A protester outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis, where the trial of former Police Officer Derek Chauvin is being held. (Julio Cortez/AP)Additionally, Minneapolis Public Schools announced it would shift to distance learning Wednesday through Friday in anticipation of the Chauvin verdict. Various police departments are preparing for the verdict and any protests that may follow.
Fort Worth will have its first new mayor in 10 years. Here are the candidates vying to replace Betsy Price
Fort Worth will have its first new mayor in 10 years after the May 1 election, in which 10 candidates are vying to replace one of the city’s most enduring leaders, five-term Mayor Betsy Price. Mattie Parker, 37, is a 2021 candidate for Fort Worth mayor. (Courtesy)An education advocate, Parker serves on the boards of Read Fort Worth and ACH Child and Family Services. “Fort Worth’s a great city, but, man, we move slow,” she told Fort Worth Magazine in February. Brian Byrd, 50, is a 2021 candidate for Fort Worth mayor.
In Minneapolis, a fortified city awaits Derek Chauvin verdict
“This city feels like it’s occupied by the military,” said Martinez, a commercial painter who lives in nearby St. Paul. But in the city that has come to epitomize America’s debate over police killings, there are places today in Minneapolis that can feel almost like a police state. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Ted Nugent tests positive for COVID-19 after previously calling the virus a 'leftist scam'
Singer Ted Nugent has revealed he has tested positive for COVID-19, just months after he called the virus a 'leftist scam' and 'not a real pandemic'. 'Today is the 19th of April 2021 during clusterf**k pandemic Chinese virus attack 21,' he said. 'I was tested positive today.' He added: 'I got the Chinese sh*t,' echoing the former president's repeated insistence on calling COVID-19 the 'Chinese virus' which critics say has led to a surge in hate crimes targeting the Asian American population. His comments came after he called Floyd a 'punk thug criminal' who 'committed suicide on fentanyl' in a November Facebook Live rant.
Top Democrats refuse to condemn Maxine Waters even as Tucker Carlson slams 'mob violence'
Tucker Carlson has said top Democrats will not punish and refuse to condemn Maxine Waters 'because they agree' with her calls for 'more confrontation' during Black Lives Matter protests. And Carlson told his viewers: 'Leading Democrats aren't going to punish Maxine Waters because they're not embarrassed to Maxine Waters. 'Is Maxine Waters greater of guilty of greater incitement than Donald Trump? 'People like Maxine Waters don't care if you point out that they're hypocrites. He went on to criticize her support of the LA rioters, adding: 'Maxine Waters cheered them on.'
The clock runs down on Derek Chauvin's murder trial as the jury deliberates his fate
AdvertisementThe clock has run down on Derek Chauvin's murder trial. Second-degree murder Jurors must agree not only that Chauvin caused Floyd's death but that his actions rose to the level of third-degree assault. AdvertisementNight after night the protests have raged, and curfews have been instituted in an unending echo of the civil unrest that followed Floyd's death last May. Because though prosecutors brought several compelling medical experts, they offered different opinions as to what caused Floyd's death. 'I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty,' Waters said of the Chauvin trial.
No, Maxine Waters Did Not Violate Derek Chauvin’s Right to a Fair Trial
Chauvin’s trial has generated enormous publicity, and a member of Congress has the same First Amendment right to talk about it, even in heated terms, as everyone else. The jury has an obligation to disregard all public commentary and limit its deliberations to the information presented at trial. Absent evidence showing that Waters directly biased the jury—and that is probably impossible to prove—she did not undermine Chauvin’s constitutional right to an impartial jury. The judge ordered the proceedings to be televised in recognition of the constitutional right to a public trial. Cahill made the right call by rejecting Chauvin’s motion for a mistrial, but his speculation that an appeals court might nonetheless overturn a guilty verdict on the basis of Waters’ words badly misses the mark.
What Kind of Flag Can I Fly Outside My House?
“For a constitutional violation to occur, you need a state actor,” Mr. Rovinsky said. “A court would want to look for discriminatory intent,” Mr. Rovinsky said. Mr. Pendery was told he would need to apply for approval in order to fly his flag, which he chose not to do. “I believe it was selective enforcement,” Mr. Pendery said. “I put my flag back up the same day,” Mr. Pendery said.
Here are the jurors who will decide whether Derek Chauvin is guilty of murder in George Floyd's death
Over about two weeks last month, lawyers for the prosecution and defense quizzed potential jurors about their knowledge of Floyd’s death, their opinions of Chauvin, and their attitudes about police, racial injustice, and the protests and rioting that followed Floyd’s death. Here's what's next in the Chauvin trial: The evidence is in at the trial of Derek Chauvin, charged in the death of George Floyd. She said she believes her community improved because of the massive protests that took place after Floyd’s death. She said the protests after Floyd’s death produced something good – “the raising of voices around the world for change" – and something bad. Referring to the protesters who lashed out after Floyd’s death, she said, “maybe they felt they were never heard.
Derek Chauvin Trial: The 12 Jurors Deliberating His Future
She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a “somewhat negative” impression of Chauvin. He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin, based on clips of bystander video he saw on TV. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
Tucker Carlson accuses media of ‘lynching’ Derek Chauvin
Fox News host Tucker Carlson has come under fire for accusing the media of “lynching” Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer on trial in the death of George Floyd. The prosecution has argued that Mr Chauvin shunned his police training when he inflicted deadly force on Mr Floyd. Twitter users were quick to blast the cable news host, with Joshua Benevides writing: “Tucker’s White Power Hour just keeps getting more and more explicit.”Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the Inside Washington newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice Thanks for signing up to the Inside Washington newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. We’ve thought about it because that is the core principle of our entire justice system,” Mr Carlson said.
Golden Globes' ex-president calls BLM a 'racist hate movement' and compares work to CHARLES MANSON
This marks the latest controversy for the HFPA after it recently came under fire for not having a black member in more than 20 years. It then goes on to accuse BLM, the social movement protesting against racist violence against black people, of 'carrying on Manson's work.' Manson formed a cult - the Manson Family - which wanted to start a race war in the 1960s. The article also goes on to slam Cullors and BLM for their apparent ties to Hollywood, claiming the 'racist hate movement was always an entertainment industry production.' 'Please remove me from any racist email you wish to send to the membership.
Ex-HFPA head slammed for emailing article deeming BLM ‘hate movement’: report
And Black Lives Matter is carrying on Manson’s work,” the post reads. The article shared by Phil Berk says, “Black Lives Matter is carrying on” Charles Manson’s work. His email received swift backlash — with one member, Patricia Danaher, calling him “a thundering disgrace.”Patrisse Cullors is the co-founder of Black Lives Matter. Berk told the group that he “only intended to illustrate the hypocricy [sic] that engulfs us,” the L.A. Times said. Black Lives Matter Co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors has reportedly purchased a $1.4 million home in Topanga Canyon, in Los Angeles.
The jurors who will decide Derek Chauvin’s fate
There is one Black woman, two multiracial women, three White men, three Black men and six White women. Juror #91 — Black woman, 60sA grandmother originally from South Minneapolis, she says she has a relative on the city’s police force, but they aren’t close. Juror #55 — White woman, 50sA single mother of two who rides motorcycles in her spare time, she described being scared by the unrest that gripped Minneapolis last year. Even with such a spotlight on this case, the jurors’ deliberations will be conducted in private. Everything other than the outcome will remain secret unless the jurors decide to talk to the public or attorneys involved after things wrap up.
Golden Globes' ex-president calls BLM a 'racist hate movement' and compares work to CHARLES MANSON
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has apologized after one of its former presidents sent an email to members calling Black Lives Matter a 'racist hate movement' and comparing its work to mass murderer Charles Manson. It then goes on to accuse BLM, the social movement protesting against racist violence against black people, of 'carrying on Manson's work.' Manson formed a cult - the Manson Family - which wanted to start a race war in the 1960s. The article also goes on to slam Cullors and BLM for their apparent ties to Hollywood, claiming the 'racist hate movement was always an entertainment industry production.' 'Please remove me from any racist email you wish to send to the membership.
Top Democrats refuse to condemn Maxine Waters even as Tucker Carlson slams 'mob violence'
Tucker Carlson has said top Democrats will not punish and refuse to condemn Maxine Waters 'because they agree' with her calls for 'more confrontation' during Black Lives Matter protests. And Carlson told his viewers: 'Leading Democrats aren't going to punish Maxine Waters because they're not embarrassed to Maxine Waters. 'Is Maxine Waters greater of guilty of greater incitement than Donald Trump? 'People like Maxine Waters don't care if you point out that they're hypocrites. He went on to criticize her support of the LA rioters, adding: 'Maxine Waters cheered them on.'
Maxine Waters called deadly LA riots a 'rebellion', told supporters to confront Trump officials
TOLD SUPPORTERS IN 2018 TO PUBLICLY CONFRONT TRUMP OFFICIALSIn June 2018, Waters told people to harass Trump cabinet members and other administration officials in public after the then-president imposed a 'zero tolerance' policy for illegal immigration at the southern border. During a 2018 rally, Waters told her supporters to confront and harass Trump officials in publicThe congresswoman's comments came after several Trump officials had been recently confronted in public – especially while dining at restaurants. But Waters said in September 2018 remarks, while she does threaten Trump supporters 'all the time,' she was not in that instance. 'What bothered me so much was, they tried to frame that as violence,' Waters said. Fauci then told Jordan 'you're making this personal' when the Ohio representative said no one was allowed to criticize him.
Biden called George Floyd's brother Philonise after Derek Chauvin jury was sent out in Minneapolis
AdvertisementGeorge Floyd's brother Philonise revealed President Joe Biden called him on Monday when the jury was sent out to deliberate in Derek Chauvin's trial. The footage of Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd's neck during Floyd's arrest last summer set off protests in Minneapolis and around the country. 'There are those who would like for me … to tell people to go inside, to be peaceful, that they have to accept the verdict,' Waters said during a 1992 press conference. 'What bothered me so much was, they tried to frame that as violence,' Waters said. Fauci then told Jordan 'you're making this personal' when the Ohio representative said no one was allowed to criticize him.
A Colorado judge resigned after using the N-word and saying 'all lives matter' at work
The Supreme Court of Colorado released an order censuring Judge Natalie T. Chase on Friday. A white Colorado judge has resigned after making colleagues uncomfortable with her comments on race, including repeatedly using the N-word during a car ride with a Black coworker. She said she "did not feel free to express her discomfort or emotions due to fear of retaliation by Judge Chase." Chase also made comments critical of the Black Lives Matter movement during two separate incidents in court, in front of Black court workers. When one of the employees "tried to explain the Black Lives Matter movement" to her, Chase "stated that she believes all lives matter."
The case for a capital gains tax on Washington’s super-rich
Part of strengthening our economy for the future means passing Senate Bill 5096 — a wealth tax on the extraordinary capital gains profits the super-rich make from selling stocks, bonds and other lucrative assets. Importantly, it will also be a small step toward balancing our tax code and addressing the underlying cracks in our state economy. Multiple studies, including a 12-year study of millionaire behavior and a Stanford University study of eight state tax increases, have proven that the “millionaire migration” scare tactic is a myth. A wealth tax on capital gains will also help strengthen our foundation for the next disaster and begin to unwind decades of policy choices that led to this moment. But passing a wealth tax on the capital gains profits of the super-rich to invest in education and child care will do something meaningful for hundreds of thousands of struggling families.
Britney Spears divides fans with Black Lives Matter post
It showed a black bus passenger holding a sign with a BLM hashtag reading, “White people have generational wealth. !”But the post was quickly flooded by fans who found it toxic — with many threatening to stop following her, and even calling the post racist in itself. Britney Spears divided fans with the post. WireImage“I mean – this is literally not true,” Dale Recchia told the star of her post. Getty ImagesAnother fan suggested the star should do more than just post photos online if she was so concerned about the wealth divide.
What to do about whataboutism in politics
Few arguments are as appealing in those efforts as whataboutism, given both how easy they are to make and how potent they can be. With that in mind, I’ve been thinking about a few rules for how to deal with whataboutism — in good faith. Along with other forms of whataboutism, this often ignores the fact that This Other Thing has indeed been dealt with extensively. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementTake the most recent big example of whataboutism: The Capitol riot and its circumstances compared to various other things, like racial-justice protests. Hypocrisy is keyOne bit of whataboutism that cropped up this weekend was when Biden went golfing for the first time as president.
Minneapolis A Fortified City As It Anxiously Awaits Derek Chauvin Verdict
“This city feels like it’s occupied by the military,” said Martinez, a commercial painter who lives in nearby St. Paul. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)Many here doubt the promises of law enforcement, which has long had a troubled relationship with the city’s Black community. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Colorado judge resigning after censure for racial slur
DENVER — A Colorado judge will resign after being censured for repeatedly saying a racial slur in a conversation with a Black employee, expressing her views on racial justice while on the bench as well as using court employees to work on personal business. The Colorado Supreme Court issued the censure for 18th Judicial District Judge Natalie T. Chase on Friday, endorsing the state judicial disciplinary commission’s conclusions that Chase undermined confidence in the judiciary and violated a rule against showing bias or prejudice based on race or ethnicity. The comment came while two or three other employees, two of them Black, were in court, according to the ruling. The commission also found that Chase used a non-racist, derogatory term when talking about a fellow female judge. According to a December review by The Denver Post, public censures of judges in Colorado are rare, with only four judges publicly censured between 2010 and 2020.
Black Women Are Leading The Charge To Take Back The Cannabis Industry
And it’s Black women in particular who are leading the charge to ensure this industry serves communities of color. Black-owned cannabis businesses remain rare despite diversity efforts, and the cannabis industry is still incredibly difficult and expensive to enter, particularly if you’re actually growing cannabis. Other women-led initiatives such as Women Grow have created opportunities for Black women cannabis entrepreneurs to make an impact in the industry. As EstroHaze CMO Sirita Wright notes, “Black women are becoming more active and vocal participants within the cannabis industry because of the barriers they’re faced with.”Black women are becoming more active and vocal participants within the cannabis industry because of the barriers they’re faced with. Ultimately, how Black women work together will dictate their future in the industry — and so far, against all odds, they’re winning.
Is there a cure for the Oscar blues?
Enter email address Sign Me Up You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times. AdvertisementArcLight of the covenantArcLight’s demise hit the Los Angeles filmmaking and moviegoing community hard. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times; photo illustration by Nicole Vas / Los Angeles Times)If Decurion Corp.'s goal was to set off a film community panic over the closing (or really, non-reopening) of ArcLight Cinemas last week, it was a stunning success. AdvertisementArcLight’s demise is an emotional hit to Los Angeles and its community of filmmakers and moviegoers. Video games’ cultural currency is undeniably growing as more young people use them as their way of interacting socially.
Editorial: Racial tension not invitation for political posturing
No one wants a repeat of last summer, in which Minneapolis erupted in violence after the killing of Floyd. Boston was also the site of riots and looting last summer, resulting in injuries to police officers. The Chauvin trial and the recent shootings of Wright and Toledo have sparked more demonstrations calling for justice, including in Boston. Not alone — the work must include community and faith-based organizations to work in tandem with law enforcement. The impetus to pounce on the all-police-are-bad narrative for political gain undermines the very communities politicians purport to care about.
Waters claims 'judge says my words don't matter' despite court anger at her urging 'confrontation'
This is the standard, Nelson told the jury, that the state used to, 'take away your children.' A reasonable officer, he said, will take into consideration his immediate surroundings and who he's on the scene with. The proper analysis is to take those nine minutes 29 seconds and put them in the context of what would a reasonable officer know.' Nelson told the court: 'I have thought a lot about the difference between perspective and perception. Equally they may find him guilty of causing Floyd's death if they decide that his act or acts were a substantial factor in Floyd's death.
Adam Toledo: What the footage tells us about Chicago Police shooting of 13-year-old boy
The body camera footage shakes because of the officer's movement and is low resolution. We can also see his right hand – or an object in his hand – is dark compared to his left hand. Toledo moments before he is shot Toledo moments before he is shotIn the next second, Adam is shot. In the police's edited version, the footage zooms in and appears to show Adam's right arm moving behind the fence. In the distressing footage, Adam is rolled on to his back and blood can be seen coming from his mouth.
Biden called George Floyd's brother Philonise after Derek Chauvin jury was sent out in Minneapolis
AdvertisementGeorge Floyd's brother Philonise revealed President Joe Biden called him on Monday when the jury was sent out to deliberate in Derek Chauvin's trial. The footage of Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd's neck during Floyd's arrest last summer set off protests in Minneapolis and around the country. The Kentucky Republican said that Waters' demand for a guilty verdict was 'like somebody window-shopping or ordering off a menu.' 'What bothered me so much was, they tried to frame that as violence,' Waters said. Fauci then told Jordan 'you're making this personal' when the Ohio representative said no one was allowed to criticize him.
BTS meets the Golden Arches: McDonald’s unveils a new meal inspired by the K-pop superstars
After the unmitigated U.S. success of its celebrity meal partnerships with Travis Scott and J Balvin, McDonald’s is now going global with one of the planet’s most popular groups. Today, the fast-feeder announced that it’s teaming up with Korean pop superstars BTS for its newest “signature” meal. While both the J Balvin and Travis Scott meals were made up of existing McDonald’s products, the dipping sauces for the BTS edition were previously only available in South Korea. While there were no specific details, McDonald’s did hint at “more surprises in the coming weeks” around this collaboration. The brand’s merchandise collab of more than 100 items with Travis Scott was wildly popular with collectors and resellers.
Nashville civil rights veterans see hope for future
James Lawson speaks in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Lawson, who led nonviolence workshops during the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, said he's encour... James Lawson speaks in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Lawson, who led nonviolence workshops during the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, said he's encour...NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — On April 20, 1960, the Rev. They went on to play integral roles in nearly every major campaign of the civil rights era. ADVERTISEMENTRecently, The Associated Press hosted a video call in which Lawson and three of his workshop participants discussed their civil rights work and how it reverberates in today’s justice movements like Black Lives Matter and voting rights in Georgia. Zwerg said the Black Lives Matter movement gives him hope, as do the young people working to end gun violence after surviving school shootings.
George Floyd news: Jury retires in Chauvin trial as judge says Maxine Waters could overturn verdict
Refinery29WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 05: A member of the right-wing group Oath Keepers stands guard during a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court Building on January 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. As of now, more than 400 people have been charged with federal crimes in connection with the January 6 insurrection, according to 60 Minutes. “Some of those people with Oath Keepers could have been BLM. That’s not Oath Keepers.” Arroyo shared similar sentiments with 60 Minutes, telling Alfonsi: “That goes against everything we’ve ever taught, everything we believe in. How about some more R29 goodness, right here?QAnon Has Theories About Ivanka Trump's VaccineThe Oath Keepers Are An Armed Pro-Trump MilitiaHow Anti-Abortion Terrorism Fueled The MAGA Attack
Column: What will make people care about police shootings of Latinos?
So a question inevitably, understandably arises among Latinos after each tragedy: Why don’t police shootings of Latinos get more national attention? But wondering why police abuse against Latinos doesn’t get more publicity is the wrong question for Latinos to ask. The Los Angeles Police Department, once the domain of racist Southerners and Okies, is now dominated by Latinos who absorbed those attitudes from their predecessors. People need to see the numbers, and the numbers are outrageous.”He and others are working on a database of Latinos killed by law enforcement since 2000 in hopes that more Latinos will care. If more Latinos can’t be motivated to care, how can we expect the rest of society to care?
As protests against killings by police continue, some look to refocus on Rhode Island
They called for justice for Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man shot during a traffic stop in a Minneapolis suburb on April 11. Amanda Milkovits/Globe Staff“Black and brown people continue to be murdered by police,” said activist Enrique Sanchez. It’s Black and brown children killing each other,” said Cedric Huntley. If more people get involved and care about what’s happening in their neighborhoods, take initiative and responsibility when they see something wrong, they could prevent tragedy from striking other families, Huntley said. “Black and brown kids are killing each other, and nobody is protesting,” Huntley said.
Noel Clarke says he had 'no choice' but to write his own roles as he'd never land the jobs he wanted
Noel Clarke has revealed that he had 'no choice' but to write his own acting roles after realising he'd never be offered the jobs he wanted. From 2006-2016 Noel wrote, directed and starred in the acclaimed trilogy of films Kidulthood, Adulthood and Brotherhood. Noel told Interview magazine: 'I grew up in Ladbroke Grove... which sounds really glamorous now, but at the time it wasn't very glamorous.' And, in 2007, Noel set up his own production company Unstoppable Entertainment to try and promote more diversity in the film and TV industry. The pair originally struggled to get the show commissioned and Noel told Sky News at the time he didn't 'think the country was ready' for their positive depiction of two black lead characters.
Rep. Maxine Waters Draws Republican Backlash for 'Confrontational' Comment but Says She Was 'Distorted'
"We've got to stay on the street and we've got to get more active, we've got to get more confrontational," Waters said. Rep. Maxine Waters Rep. Maxine Waters | Credit: ShutterstockWho Is Maxine Waters? Waters' Comments Have Irked the GOP BeforeIn 2018, Waters told supporters they should confront Trump administration officials in public spaces: "You get out and you create a crowd. Rep. Maxine Waters Rep. Maxine Waters | Credit: Rich Fury/GettyWaters Explains 'Get More Confrontational' CommentWaters told The Grio that the conservative criticism against her was wrongheaded. Rep. Maxine Waters Rep. Maxine Waters | Credit: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/ShutterstockWho Is Criticizing Waters for Her Comments?
Soccer: Players take a knee as Premier League restarts
Added: 15.04.2021 18:20 | 17 views | 0 commentsPremier League players, including champions Manchester City, took a knee before kickoff in support of the "Black Lives Matter" movement as the English season restarted on Wednesday.
'By not taking a knee, cricket raised a ?nger': England cricket criticized for stopping kneeling in midst of fight against racism
'By not taking a knee, cricket raised a ?nger': England cricket criticized for stopping kneeling in midst of fight against racismAdded: 16.04.2021 12:19 | 33 views | 0 commentsA leading cricket journalist has said the England cricket team were wrong to stop kneeling in the midst of the Black Lives Matter protests and the struggle against racism last summer.
'By not taking a knee, cricket raised a ?nger'
Added: 15.04.2021 16:20 | 38 views | 0 commentsA leading cricket journalist has said the England cricket team were wrong to stop kneeling in the midst of the Black Lives Matter protests and the struggle against racism last summer.
What to Watch on Tuesday: It's a Cruel Summer as Freeform's time-hopping mystery debuts
And now they're all facing some big turning points: Are Charley and Davis on the brink of getting back together? Hot girl summer is so 2020 — Cruel Summer will be your new pop culture obsession. —Sydney BucksbaumRelated content:SasquatchHOW/WHEN & WHERE TO WATCH: Streaming on HuluDocuseries DebutDid a Bigfoot maul and kill three men on a cannabis farm in Northern California? —GHRelated content:Hear more on all of today's must-see picks, plus TK and TK, in EW's What to Watch podcast, hosted by Gerrad Hall. Storage Wars (season premiere) — A&EThe Real Housewives of Dallas — BravoFBI — CBSChopped: Martha Rules — Food NetworkDelilah — OWN9:30 p.m.10 p.m.
Like it or not, 'woke' Corporate America is here to stay
Ross's conclusions stem from the annual Edelman Trust Barometer . In the United States, 70% of elite individuals and 51% of remaining respondents expressed trust in business leadership in 2016. Ross said the increasing distrust of government and growing trust in business has persisted over the last five years. The release of the 2020 Edelman Trust barometer revealed that brand trust and brand reputation ranked second and third behind price as the most important factors for consumers deciding which new products to purchase. Edelman's researchers have since found that customers expect companies to educate, advocate and use their influence to create positive social change.
In Minneapolis, a fortified city awaits Chauvin verdict
A few steps away at the Iron Door Pub, three more National Guard soldiers and a Minneapolis police officer stood out front, watching the street. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Minnesota Governor Tim Walz faced withering criticism for not stepping in quicker to deploy the National Guard. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Czechs exclude Rosatom from nuclear tender after dispute with Russia
National ReviewThe Biden-Harris Food and Drug Administration just gave the green light to abortion pills by mail. The Sisters of Life, who are a ten-minute Uber ride away, or less, from Manhattan’s Planned Parenthood, are contemplative and active. If Planned Parenthood is more important to you than human life and flourishing. And according to the Guttmacher Institute (friends of Planned Parenthood), chemical abortions have skyrocketed — from about 71,000 in 2001 to 340,000 in 2017. And to make sure that the girls know that there are other options?
5 things to know for April 20: Chauvin trial, Covid-19, Indianapolis, QAnon, Mars
Chauvin trialThe fate of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is now in the hands of jurors. They began deliberating yesterday evening and will resume today. This tense period follows three weeks of testimony in one of the most closely watched cases of the Black Lives Matter era. Waters on Saturday night called for protesters to "stay on the street" and "get more confrontational" if Chauvin is acquitted of killing George Floyd. Some Republicans say she was inciting violence, but supporters say she was clearly referencing the civil rights movement's history of nonviolence.
Golden Globes crisis continues as former president sends anti-BLM email
Already under fire for its failings over membership diversity, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), the organisation behind the Golden Globes, has been forced to apologise after its former long-term president emailed a copy of an article to members that called Black Lives Matter a “racist hate movement”. According to the LA Times, Phil Berk, who served eight terms as the HPFA president, ending in 2011, shared a copy of an article from rightwing website Frontpagemag.com, which described Black Lives Matter as a “racist … hate group” and claimed that the movement is carrying out the “race war” that Charles Manson aspired to start. The crisis engulfing the HFPA began shortly before the Golden Globes award ceremony in January, when an LA Times report accused the organisation of a lack of diversity in its membership as well as “ethical lapses” in the way it conducted its business. The HFPA’s subsequent pledge to add “Black and other underrepresented professionals to [the] organisation” and improve “transparency” over its voting and membership processes, was deemed inadequate by high-profile film industry campaign group Time’s Up. In March a large group of influential Hollywood PR agencies said they would boycott the Golden Globes, the primary source of the HFPA’s income, unless the HFPA made “profound and lasting change”.
Derek Chauvin: How jury could affect the trial of George Floyd’s alleged killer
The closely watched trial of Derek Chauvin, the white former Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, by pressing his knee onto his neck for minutes during an arrest last May, is nearing its end. Of the 12 members of the jury, six members are White, four are Black and two are mixed race. Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Local activists took particular issue with the treatment of Juror 76, a Black man who once lived in the neighbourhood where Mr Floyd was killed.
The Lead Organizer for the Amazon Union Drive Has No Regrets
The beauty of being a local union and being here in Bessemer is that we’re not leaving. We’re going to be able to hold Amazon to account for the things that they’ve done and continue to do. When we look at that, if we flipped 450 voters, brother, we beat Amazon. I think workers felt like Amazon made them feel small. Amazon was big, Amazon has a ton of money and a ton of power over their life, but you know what else is big?
How Covid Transformed US Theater
Eric Ting remembers the chill that passed through the room when someone coughed during the California Shakespeare Theater gala in March of last year. The week before opening, “the middle of America was not experiencing the reality of Covid,” Sharif recalls. “How we’re making things right now is speculative and abstract, and pushing into the question: How can this be theater?” says Benson. Titled “We See You, White American Theater” (WSYWAT), it put the industry on notice: “We have watched you exploit us, shame us, diminish us, and exclude us. And they are helping to mobilize theater makers to organize for government support like never before.20They have reason to feel optimistic.
It’s time for a moratorium on police shooting videos
To make their respective cases, both the defense and the prosecution looped traumatic videos of Floyd’s 2020 death in Minneapolis. For the last 10 years, I have studied how African Americans use mobile and social media to document police brutality. I urged the public to think before posting Black death to their social media timelines. For all of these reasons, I now believe that circulating videos of Black and brown death at the hands of police reinforces white supremacy. I am calling for a moratorium on broadcasting these videos on television and online unless the victim’s family consents to such publicity.
Nextdoor launches anti-racist screens for community posts
Community app Nextdoor launched its latest feature in a series of anti-racist initiatives, this time prompting users to think before they post "offensive or hurtful" language in their neighborhood forums. Nextdoor, founded in 2008, is a community networking app that connects users with others living in their area to share news, resources, and engage with one another using community forums. Nextdoor also pledged to circulate resources with community leaders on the app to facilitate more inclusive dialogue. The new "anti-racism notification" is an expansion of the Kindness Reminder technology and the app's anti-racism initiatives. The company hopes that a similar anti-racist tool will result in a steady decline of racist and discriminatory posts.
Nextdoor Launches Anti-Racist Screens For Community Posts
Community app Nextdoor launched its latest feature in a series of anti-racist initiatives, this time prompting users to think before they post "offensive or hurtful" language in their neighborhood forums. Nextdoor, founded in 2008, is a community networking app that connects users with others living in their area to share news, resources, and engage with one another using community forums. Nextdoor also pledged to circulate resources with community leaders on the app to facilitate more inclusive dialogue. The new "anti-racism notification" is an expansion of the Kindness Reminder technology and the app's anti-racism initiatives. The company hopes that a similar anti-racist tool will result in a steady decline of racist and discriminatory posts.
Kevin McCarthy jumps on Marjorie Taylor Greene's bandwagon, saying he'll introduce his own resolution to censure Maxine Waters for her 'dangerous comments'
Alex Wong/Getty ImagesHouse minority leader Kevin McCarthy plans to introduce his own resolution to censure Maxine Waters. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is jumping on Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's bandwagon as he plans to introduce a resolution of his own to censure Rep. Maxine Waters for what he calls "dangerous comments." "This weekend in Minnesota, Maxine Waters broke the law by violating curfew and then incited violence. "I am hopeful that we will get a verdict that says, 'guilty, guilty, guilty,' and if we don't, we cannot go away. However, the comments Waters made might have affected the Chauvin murder trial, as Chauvin's defense attorneys cited Waters' words to call for a mistrial.
As protests continue over police killings, lawmakers try to add to the list of crimes protesters could face
TOP: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020. ABOVE: Police lead detained protesters to the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections on Sept. 23, 2020. TOP: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020. ABOVE: Police lead detained protesters to the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections on Sept. 23, 2020. LEFT: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020.
Amnesty International has culture of white privilege, report finds
Systemic bias including the capability of black staff being questioned consistently and without justification, and minority ethnic staff feeling disempowered and sidelined on projects. In June last year the international board of Amnesty International sent an email to staff addressing the Black Lives Matter movement and racism. They were given access to staff surveys and carried out six focus groups made up of 51 staff including two exclusively attended by black staff. Kieran Aldred, who worked for Amnesty International UK until 2018, said minority ethnic staff were overlooked for promotions. In February 2019, it was revealed that Amnesty International had a “toxic” working environment.
Rick Scott loved corporations. Until they ‘woke’ up after Georgia passed vote-suppression law | Editorial
Georgia’s racist voting law, not Coke or Delta, is the problem, Sen. Rubio — so are you | EditorialCorporate friend no more. Well, at least to a Fox News audience looking for blood after corporate America became “woke” with its rebuke of the crackdown on voter access Georgia just passed and Florida is considering. Meanwhile, Scott continues to jet across the country raising money from corporate America for the GOP’s efforts to retake the Senate. Congratulations,” Scott wrote. This is about creating an illusion that corporate America, Black Lives Matter — and anyone else who questions this country’s racist legacy and polices — are at war with American values.
The invention of whiteness: the long history of a dangerous idea
As the historian Nell Irvin Painter has cautioned, “white identity didn’t just spring to life full-blown and unchanging”. That religious identity was crucial for the development of the English slave trade – and eventually for the development of racial whiteness. But what united all these expressions was a singular idea: that some group of people called white was naturally superior to all others. The idea of whiteness, in other words, was identical to the idea of white supremacy. Photograph: PhotoQuest/GettyFor Ignatiev and Garvey, whiteness had been identified with white supremacy for so long that it was folly to think it was salvageable.
Rep. Maxine Waters requested police protection during Minnesota trip
California Representative Maxine Waters reportedly requested police protection while on a Minnesota trip where she told protesters to get more 'confrontational'. According to a travel log obtained by Townhall editor Katie Pavlich, Waters requested a US Capitol Police escort on Saturday. On Monday, House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy claimed that up to 15 Democrats could vote for his motion to censure Waters. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
Rep. Maxine Waters requested police protection during Minnesota trip
California Representative Maxine Waters reportedly requested police protection while on a Minnesota trip where she told protesters to get more 'confrontational'. According to a travel log obtained by Townhall editor Katie Pavlich, Waters requested a US Capitol Police escort on Saturday. On Monday, House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy claimed that up to 15 Democrats could vote for his motion to censure Waters. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
Hundreds march through Minneapolis demanding justice for George Floyd
AdvertisementThe National Guard activated more than 3,000 troops ahead of a verdict in the murder case against Derek Chauvin as hundreds marched through Minneapolis on Monday demanding justice for George Floyd. Images showed hundreds marching through the city demanding justice for Floyd while waving Black Lives Matter flags and holding signs that read 'Blue Lives Murder'. National Guard troops have been deployed by the hundreds in anticipation of the verdict. The Minnesota National Guard activated more than 3,000 guardsmen to assist Minneapolis law enforcement as a precaution. He said the Army secretary has the authority to approve any request for DC National Guard but did not have details on the request.
Analysis: Waters' comments on Chauvin trial pour fuel on the fire -- and expose Republican hypocrisy
That the presiding judge in the trial warned that the Waters comments might have given the defense of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin an opening during any eventual appeal against conviction raise the level of seriousness even more. They're not giving Waters, a veteran of the civil rights movement and its marches and protests, similar benefit of the doubt. Waters comments channel decades of frustrationThe context of the comments by Waters -- amid the immediate tension surrounding the trial and also filtered through the decades of racial struggles and the history of police violence toward Black Americans -- is crucial. L. Chris Stewart, co-lead counsel for Floyd's family, dismissed concerns that the Waters comments could threaten a conviction and said the defense was trying to cover up a weak case. But after Cahill's remarks and McCarthy's intervention, there were signs of a more organized defense for the veteran Democrat.
Florida’s Trump-Loving Governor Just Made It OK to Hit Protesters With Your Car
Regularly conflating peaceful protesters with violent ones, he frequently threatened to unleash “law and order” (read: police brutality) on people for having the audacity to attempt to have their voices heard. Earlier that month he had the National Guard tear-gas peaceful protesters assembled in D.C. in the wake of George Floyd’s killing so that he could do a Bible photo op. On Monday, Florida governor Ron DeSantis signed an “anti-riot bill” into law that, among other things, grants civil immunity to people who decide to drive their cars into protesters who are blocking a road. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy also accused Waters of “inciting violence” in Minnesota, threatening to take “action” against the Democrat this week. If you would like to receive the Levin Report in your inbox daily, click here to subscribe.
Gay couples win major victory after Alaska denied them benefits for years
State employees administering Alaska’s Permanent Fund failed to give gay couples their benefits, over four years after the state’s ban on same-sex marriage was voided. The “oil wealth check” provides dividends that are distributed to most citizens of Alaska annually by constitutional order. Most citizens living in Alaska and intent on remaining there longer than a year are eligible to the check. A permanent court injunction on Alaska’s same-sex marriage ban was issued in 2014, nullifying the rule that dictated same-sex couples could not receive the dividend. “Unfortunately the state of Alaska doesn’t recognize same sex marriage yet,” one employee erroneously stated in a July 2019 email.
In Minneapolis, a fortified city awaits Chauvin verdict
National Guard members are seen through fencing and wire near the Minneapolis Police 3rd Precinct in Minneapolis on Monday, April 19, 2021, after the murder trial against former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin advanced to jury deliberations. A few steps away at the Iron Door Pub, three more National Guard soldiers and a Minneapolis police officer stood out front, watching the street. City officials estimate the city suffered roughly $350 million in damage, mostly to commercial properties. Law enforcement leaders, for example, need to ensure proper crowd control training, and that officers from other jurisdictions are under a single command. Ian Bethel, a leader in the city’s Black church community, sounded almost angry Monday as he spoke alongside the law enforcement officials.
Gov. DeSantis Signs Florida's ‘Anti-Riot' Bill Into Law
Ron DeSantis signed a new bill into law Monday that aims to crack down on violent protests in the state. DeSantis signed the so-called "anti-riot" bill during a news conference in Polk County. Under the law, penalties will be enhanced for crimes committed during a riot or violent protest. It also strips local governments of civil liability protections if they interfere with law enforcement’s efforts to respond to a violent protest and add language to state law that could force local governments to justify a reduction in law enforcement budgets. Opponents of the bill said it was racist and saw it as an attempt to squash the voices of groups like Black Lives Matter.
Minneapolis courthouse draws crowd as jury starts deliberating in Derek Chauvin trial
The fortified downtown courthouse became the epicenter of a tense city Monday as the jury began deliberating in the murder trial of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin. AdvertisementMichael Jones, 59, of Minneapolis, a church social services director, watches the closing arguments from the street outside the courthouse. Advertisement“Video is making a difference across the country, from Rodney King to George Floyd,” Jones said. Gianna Floyd, the daughter of George Floyd, walks towards the entrance of the the courthouse with her family Monday. “I want it to send a message that George Floyd’s life was taken unjustly,” she said.
A high-stakes moment for LAPD as city braces for verdict in Derek Chauvin trial
Now, with a verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin looming and the potential for more protests, the LAPD faces a major test of whether it can improve tactics as promised. But as the LAPD unveiled its plans Monday, a federal judge placed new restrictions on the department’s use of hard-foam projectiles to clear unruly crowds. Prosecutors and Chauvin’s defense team gave closing arguments Monday in the Minneapolis trial, leaving the case in the hands of the jury. Marshall found that the activists had successfully shown that they face future “irreparable injury” from the weapons, including at expected protests following the Chauvin verdict, if the court didn’t immediately intervene. If Chauvin is acquitted, he said, any violence in the streets will have been “agitated by the way law enforcement responds to people.”
Colorado judge resigns after using N-word multiple times and using racially insensitive language
A Colorado judge who was censured by the state's Supreme Court after being accused of using racist language with a coworker has resigned. "Judge Chase is white and the Family Court Facilitator is Black," the documents read. "During the conversation, Judge Chase used the full N-word a number of times," the documents state. "The employee tried to explain the Black Lives Matter movement, and Judge Chase stated that she believes all lives matter," according to the documents. "Judge Chase also stated that the conduct of the police officers in the George Floyd matter should be investigated."
One year after the fateful chokehold on Joel Acevedo, family and friends gather to rally for justice
It has been one year since Joel Acevedo was placed in a chokehold by off-duty Milwaukee police officer Michael Mattioli. Family and friends gathered on Monday outside the home where it took place to mark the anniversary and rally the public to support justice. Acevedo died from his injuries about a week after the fight, and now Mattioli, 33, has been charged with first-degree reckless homicide. According to the complaint, Mattioli said he woke up to Acevedo looking through the pants Mattioli wore the night before. A police officer that took an oath to protect human rights, this is what we stand here for."
West St. Paul stays fines against homeowner whose ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural violates city code
Ryan Weyandt had until this past Thursday to remove a colorful “Black Lives Matter” mural that runs along a wooden fence at his West St. Paul home — or else be fined by the city. On Friday, Dave Meisinger put the pro-police slogan “Blue Lives Matter” in blue and white paint on a wooden fence at his home. City code prohibits fences from being more than one color or having words or pictures. COUNCIL DEBATEStaying fines for Weyandt was introduced by Council Member John Justen at the start of the April 12 work session meeting. Earlier in the meeting, he noted how the council had discussed city code late last year after a homeowner put up anti-abortion signs outside his home.
Waters claims 'judge says my words don't matter' despite court anger at her urging 'confrontation'
This is the standard, Nelson told the jury, that the state used to, 'take away your children.' A reasonable officer, he said, will take into consideration his immediate surroundings and who he's on the scene with. The proper analysis is to take those nine minutes 29 seconds and put them in the context of what would a reasonable officer know.' Nelson told the court: 'I have thought a lot about the difference between perspective and perception. Equally they may find him guilty of causing Floyd's death if they decide that his act or acts were a substantial factor in Floyd's death.
Are Outdoor Mask Mandates Still Necessary?
Several dozen states have similar mask mandates for public spaces while also allowing various levels of indoor dining. The case for keeping outdoor mask mandates starts with the fact that masks are highly effective in general. Finally, one could argue that outdoor mask mandates build a sense of social solidarity around taking the pandemic seriously, which might have all sorts of positive spillover effects, such as visually reminding people that the pandemic isn’t over. Ending outdoor mask mandates—or at the very least telling people when they can expect outdoor mask mandates to lift—is a good place to start, for a few reasons. Outdoor mask mandates might also turn people off from obeying better rules.
D.C. bolsters police presence, requests National Guard troops ahead of Derek Chauvin verdict
AdvertisementA statement issued by the Guard said the troops would be activated through May 9. AdvertisementStory continues below advertisementThe Virginia National Guard was not part of the call, and a spokeswoman for Gov. In the District, unarmed Guard troops working traffic duty — with downtown streets blocked by armored vehicles and snowplows — have become a common sight during protests over the past year. The move is a strategic one: It allows D.C. police to dispatch more officers to protests or instances of unrest. After the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, members of the D.C. Guard were joined by troops from around the country, who patrolled a fortified perimeter around the Capitol for weeks.
Billions spent on coronavirus fight, but what happens next?
Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the past decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Compounding those losses, the coronavirus pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion. A KHN and AP investigation in December found at least 24 states were crafting legislation that would limit or remove public health powers.
Bain Capital commits $4m to help the Boston nonprofit GreenLight Fund expand nationally
GreenLight, a nonprofit, acts a bit like a venture capital firm by backing social entrepreneurs and helping them replicate and expand their community-focused organizations across the country. Bain Capital, the Boston private-equity titan, has invested in dozens of for-profit companies over the years. For Simon, the Bain gift is an important validation of the GreenLight model, and will allow GreenLight to essentially double its impact in Boston and expand to 20 cities nationally, from 10. Simon estimates that GreenLight has secured commitments from donors totaling $75 million across its national footprint, including about $9 million in Boston. Shawn Brown, executive director of the BAM Boston program, said it served nearly 600 students in Greater Boston during the 2019-2020 school year.
Dems have abandoned all principle by telegraphing approval of some rioting
They’re also up in arms about a new Florida law that strengthens punishment for those who take to the streets to commit violence. Yet encouraging more explosive rioting of the kind we saw last year seems to be a priority for some Democrats. Waters told demonstrators to “get more confrontational” with law enforcement if the Chauvin jurors decide wrongly (by her political lights). Once political and cultural elites wink at rioting, illegal behavior once universally condemned, the rioting won’t stay limited to their preferred causes. Telegraphing approval to one group may well inspire other groups to do the same.
An African-American professor on the case for black patriotism
Does this posture serve the interests, rightly understood, of black Americans? Indeed, a case can be made that the correct narrative to adopt today is one of unabashed black patriotism — a forthright embrace of American nationalism by black people. Black Americans’ birthright citizenship in what is arguably history’s greatest republic is an inheritance of immense value. Some 40 million strong, black Americans are the richest and most powerful population of African descent on the planet. Are we going to look through the dark lens of the United States as a racist, genocidal, white supremacist, illegitimate force?
D.C. bolsters police presence, requests National Guard troops ahead of Derek Chauvin verdict
It also was seeking a “quick reaction force,” which could be deployed in the event of “large-scale” protests. AdvertisementThe Virginia National Guard was not part of the call, and a spokeswoman for Gov. The move is a strategic one: It allows D.C. police to dispatch more officers to protests or instances of unrest. The Army initially pushed to reject the D.C. government’s request, according to an internal memo obtained by The Post. After the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, members of the D.C. Guard were joined by troops from around the country, who patrolled a fortified perimeter around the Capitol for weeks.
VP Harris sits at counter where Greensboro Four made history
Vice President Kamala Harris sits at the lunch counter as she visits the International Civil Rights Center and Museum, Monday, April 19, 2021, in Greensboro, N.C. With Harris are LaTonya Wiley, museum tour guide, left, Melvin Skip Alston-Guilford County Board of Commissioners, John Swain, Museum director and Rev. Harris, who was in North Carolina to plug President Joe Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan, made the unscheduled visit to the International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro. ADVERTISEMENTHarris, the first female Black vice president, took a moment to sit at a section of the original Woolworth’s counter. The protest was not the first lunch counter sit-in, but garnered national attention and spurred dozens more sit-ins throughout the country. Another section of the original lunch counter is on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.
Former HFPA president faces a backlash over email calling Black Lives Matter a ‘hate movement’
An email sent Sunday by a former Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. president criticizing Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors and likening BLM to a hate group touched off a firestorm among many of the organization’s members. “As a former HFPA President and still a strong and influential voice in the group, this is not the time of information you should be disseminating to HFPA members,” replied member Rui Coimbra. “Please remove me from any racist email you wish to send to the membership. “You are a thundering disgrace Phil Berk,” wrote Patricia Danaher.
Activists see political motivations behind wave of GOP bills targeting transgender kids
More than you might think — at least according to LGBTQ rights’ advocates, who are working to fend off the bills. The proponents often frame the bills as civil rights legislation protecting women, arguing that transgender girls will have an unfair advantage in girls’ sports. The bills, which their proponents are framing as about women’s rights, are also not accompanied by broader support for women’s sports or other women’s issues. Newman said she hopes to invalidate the state bills by passing federal legislation that ensures transgender rights. AdvertisementBills targeting transgender people are not new.
Bari Weiss slams NYT and Washington Post for 'ignoring the ideological takeover of schools'
I object to the charge of systemic racism in this country, and at our school. Systemic racism, properly understood, is segregated schools and separate lunch counters. Systemic racism is unequivocally not a small number of isolated incidences over a period of decades. We have not had systemic racism against Blacks in this country since the civil rights reforms of the 1960s, a period of more than 50 years. Over the past several months, I have personally spoken to many Brearley parents as well as parents of children at peer institutions.
Detroit police chief says squad member Rep. Rashida Tlaib should resign over her comments about cops
Detroit's Chief of Police has called for a local Congresswoman to resign after she called for the abolition of police. Chief James Craig said he believes Rep. Rashida Tlaib should step down from office after she called for the abolishment of police following the fatal shooting of unarmed black man Daunte Wright. 'If I made comments on par with hers, they'd be calling for my resignation,' said Chief Craig. She continued: 'Affluent white communities already live in a world where they choose to fund youth, health, housing etc more than they fund police. The Detroit chief argued the majority of the community supported the police and that activists simply riled people up even more.
McConnell tears into Waters Minneapolis protest appearance
'I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty,' she told the press. A bullet hole is seen in the windshield of a Minnesota National Guard vehicle that was targeted in a drive-by shooting early on Sunday. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy moves to censure Maxine Waters for 'inciting violence'
'This weekend in Minnesota, Maxine Waters broke the law by violating curfew and then incited violence', McCarthy said in a tweet Monday night. 'This weekend in Minnesota, Maxine Waters broke the law by violating curfew and then incited violence', McCarthy said in a tweet Monday night. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
How the documentary 'Street Gang' tells 'vast story' of influential 'Sesame Street'
“Sesame Street” didn’t start with Big Bird, Bert and Ernie. I was really hopeful to tell the adult story of 'Sesame Street,' the struggles and the dreams of these people who came together. “The origin is the most groundbreaking, the most experimental period of ‘Sesame Street.’ By reducing the vastness of it, we were able to make it stronger.”Making the movie opened “Sesame Street” in new ways for the filmmakers. “Jon’s like, ‘We’re going to put them together,’ and it was such a huge step.”Agrelo didn’t really know that at the very beginning, “Sesame Street” was directly aimed at Black inner-city children ages 3 to 5. We still have to open up our minds and our hearts, and this program is still very much a part of that.”
James O'Keefe files defamation lawsuit against Twitter, tech giant silent on details of his suspension
Project Veritas founder James O'Keefe followed through Monday on his promise to file a defamation lawsuit against Twitter following his permanent suspension from the platform. "Twitter’s false and defamatory claim was that it removed Mr. O’Keefe because he 'operated fake accounts' ... Twitter’s published claim that Mr. O’Keefe 'operat[ed] fake accounts' is patently and demonstrably false." The lawsuit, which was filed in Westchester County, New York, outlines Project Veritas' #ExposeCNN campaign that dominated Twitter last week. Project Veritas published videos of a CNN staffer making claims about the network's overt bias and political motivations to an undercover journalist. However, Twitter declined to comment further on which "fake accounts" O'Keefe allegedly used in violation of its policies.
BLM protesters rally for ‘victim,’ leave after learning he was white
Black Lives Matter protesters in Minnesota dropped to a knee and set off to march over a fatal police shooting — only to return when they learned it was a white carjacker who had fired at police, according to reports. "Protestors kneel after hearing there was an officer-involved shooting in Burnsville moments ago," Hicks tweeted of the wild, caught-on-camera armed carjacking in the suburbs. The man who was killed is believed to be a white man in his 20s who had stolen a car from a woman at gunpoint — then repeatedly shot at cops as they chased him, Burnsville police said. Word of their planned protest after a rush to judgment quickly had the protesters ripped online. The Burnsville carjacker has yet to be identified.
How to Talk to Kids About Anti-Asian Violence And Racism
One poll last September found that 1 in 4 Asian American youths have experienced racist bullying online and in person since the pandemic began. “With the kids, we are always talking about racism, white supremacy, and patriarchy ? but usually in simpler terms,” she said. “In order to talk to our children about race and racism, we need to get comfortable talking about race, period,” she said. Much of the advice is tailored and told from the perspective of Asian American parents, but there are relevant lessons here for all parents. She tells it to them straight: Asian American people are being targeted simply for being Asian.
The 12 jurors deliberating in the trial of Derek Chauvin
He said he supports Black Lives Matter as a general concept but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things. 44 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mom of two teenage boys. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who is a single parent of two children. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. 92 is a white woman in her 40s who works in the commercial insurance business.
George Floyd’s brother has a message for America: ‘You have the right to be angry – but express it peacefully’
Terrence Floyd says trial of Derek Chauvin has been ‘intense’ (Getty Images)No words can adequately explain what this past year has been like for Terrence Floyd and the other members of George Floyd’s family. But don’t express it in a violent way, express it in a peaceful way.”He adds: “Show the people out there that think we’re animals, we’re not. I have to walk where he can’t walk, talk where he can’t talk, love where he can’t love. “And I got a question [afterwards from my friends] ‘Did I want grab him and put my knee or his neck?’ And I said no, I didn’t I didn’t feel that way. I felt disgusted, but I didn’t feel like doing any harm to him because I didn’t think it would prove a point.
Floyd family thanks Minneapolis, calls for justice
Photograph: John Minchillo/AP However, the authorities of West St Paul had other ideas. “The ordinance Ryan’s fence violates isn’t one about signs; the ordinance is about fences,” said West St Paul city council member Wendy Berry last week. The fence ordinance prohibits fences from being more than one color or containing images or letters. These included one known as the non-commercial signs ordinance, which effectively bars public displays of messages that can be interpreted as political, unless it’s within a specified election cycle, and the signs ordinance which bars signs from being attached to fences. In a mind-boggling train of events, Weyandt explained that he only recently learned that he was also in violation of the fence ordinance.
Facebook, preparing for Chauvin verdict, to limit posts that might incite violence
As closing arguments began in the trial and Minneapolis braced for a verdict, Facebook said it would identify and remove posts on the social network that urged people to bring arms to the city. That includes last year’s presidential election, when online misinformation about voter fraud galvanized supporters of former President Donald Trump. Leading up to the election, Facebook took steps to fight misinformation, foreign interference and voter suppression. The company displayed warnings on more than 150 million posts with election misinformation, removed more than 120,000 posts for violating its voter interference policies and took down 30 networks that posted false messages about the election. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer who is white, faces charges of manslaughter, second-degree murder and third-degree murder in Floyd’s death.
12 jurors deliberating in the Derek Chauvin trial are a racially diverse group
She said she was “disturbed” by the bystander video and “I just couldn’t watch it anymore.” She said she has a somewhat unfavorable view of Chauvin because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: “All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.”
Derek Chauvin trial judge blasts 'abhorrent' Rep Maxine Waters
This is the standard, Nelson told the jury, that the state used to, 'take away your children.' A reasonable officer, he said, will take into consideration his immediate surroundings and who he’s on the scene with. Nelson told the court: 'I have thought a lot about the difference between perspective and perception. Picking up on Nelson's technique of repeatedly casting Chauvin in the role of 'a reasonable officer', Blackwell said: 'Reasonable officer is not a magic word that you apply to Mr Chauvin and then he becomes one. Equally they may find him guilty of causing Floyd's death if they decide that his act or acts were a substantial factor in Floyd's death.
DeSantis espouses debunked rumors, misinformation while signing HB1 into law - WMNF
Share this:On Monday morning, Governor Ron DeSantis used debunked rumors and misinformation to justify his HB1 bill. DeSantis signed the bill into law while flanked by a group of law enforcement officials and Republican legislators at the Polk County Sheriff’s Office headquarters. Listen:Depending on who you ask, HB1 is either an anti-riot bill or an anti-protest bill. Whatever your thoughts on it, HB1 is now the law of Florida’s land. Defunding policeThe bill also penalizes local governments who might “defund the police.”“So this bill actually prevents against local governments defunding law enforcement,” DeSantis said.
'This Wasn't Policing, This Was Murder,' Prosecutors Tell Jury in Closing Statement of Chauvin Trial
George Floyd begged until he could speak no more, and the defendant continued this assault." pic.twitter.com/E4u2qWnQ7V — Lois Beckett (@loisbeckett) April 19, 2021Over 3,000 National Guard troops have been deployed to the Minneapolis area for the end of Derek Chauvin's trial. For comparison, only 340 unarmed National Guard were deployed to DC ahead of the January 6 Capitol riot. pic.twitter.com/4me9rn99Ny — AJ+ (@ajplus) April 19, 2021More than 3,000 National Guard troops have been deployed in the Twin Cities in recent days, with more on standby. Hundreds of the protesters gathered outside the courthouse chanted "National Guard Go Home!"
Mobs Rioted in Washington 173 Years Ago Monday to Defend Slaveholders
An abolitionist lithograph of the slave trade in Washington, D.C., with the U.S. Capitol in the background. Daniel Bell, a free Black man in Washington, wanted to liberate his enslaved wife, children and grandchildren. The next day, the fugitives and their white abettors were marched through Washington and thrown in the city jail. They gave speeches and spread a false rumor about journalists’ involvement in the Pearl escape. (N. Currier, lithograph/Library of Congress)After the Pearl escape, Polk shared the rioters’ belief in white supremacy and their indignation at resistance to enslavement.
QAnon Deadenders Holding “For God & Country Patriot Roundup" Memorial Day Weekend in Dallas
As Vice’s Gilbert pointed out, “The name ‘QAnon’ has been used since the anonymous leader ‘Q’ first appeared on the message board 4chan. As John Grant, a member of ThisCantBeHappening!, a new, online alternative newspaper, recently wrote at Counterpunch (https://www.counterpunch.org/2021/04/14/between-qs-headspace-and-the-hard-place-of-western-history/),“’Q’ is digital warfare. It’s the kind of disinformation warfare our CIA has made against foreigners for decades; now, it’s being used against us. Two pro-Trump prominent Texas Republicans, Texas Congressman Louie Gohmert and Texas Republican Party chairman Allen West will also join the gathering. Sabal, who built “a following under the name ‘QAnon John,’” has been “kicked off Facebook and Twitter.
Fighting for our Lives
Mr. Mack’s life was saved by black officer Cariol Horne. One has to wonder, how many black men and women were violated by Mr. Kwiatkowski in the interim? I am not sure if Mr. Johnson was supporting the idea that Black Lives Matters are just a violence-filled mob that is a danger to America. It seems reasonable to protest seeing black men, black women, and black boys and girls die; or is he Pro-fascist? Your ‘lying eyes’ did see a man murdered, the real question is whether the justice system places value on the black life under the knee of Derek Chauvin, or is he just a proxy for Anglo-Saxon values.
'Do you speak English?' Minnesota cops add insult to injury when they brutalize journalists of color
This is an infuriating reality for Black journalists covering protests," New York Times reporter John Eligon tweeted on Monday. “To be clear, the police have been wildly inappropriate in Minneapolis area attempting to intimidate & assault all journalists,” he added in another tweet. “It’s especially difficult for Black journalists. "When the journalist asked 'why,' the officer said: "'Because that's our strategy right now,'" media officials said in the letter. Tim Walz made a statement on Sunday in response to the many reports of journalists being targeted by police.
Oath Keepers’ blithe interview demonstrates how little we have learned since Oklahoma City
Jim Arroyo, an Oath Keepers leader from Arizona, boasted to the CBS reporters that they receive top-flight paramilitary training because of their affiliations. “We have active-duty law enforcement in our organization that are helping to train us. Ten guys go and do something stupid and suddenly, we're the devil.”Yet strangely, few of the members of his group actually seemed to believe that the Oath Keepers arrested so far are, in fact, actually Oath Keepers. “Some of those people with Oath Keepers could have been BLM,” member Cathy York said. However, the role of the intermingling of law enforcement with such an extremist organization (buried in the subtext, unfortunately) is a central aspect of understanding how this happened.
Republicans threaten to (try to) expel Rep. Maxine Waters from House over Black Lives Matter support
The part that Republicans are really grabbing onto is Waters’ answer when reporters asked her what protesters should do going forward. “We’ve got to stay on the street and we’ve got to get more active, we’ve got to get more confrontational,” Waters said. “We’ve got to make sure that they know that we mean business.”Cue the Republicans screaming about violent protesters. Every House Democrat should condemn Maxine Waters' call for violence,” a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee told Fox News. But Republicans are shouting about cases of property damage in the midst of protests against killings.
Hundreds gather to protest 13-year-old's killing following release of body cam footage
Similarly, another elected official from Adam’s largely Latino neighborhood expressed outrage following the footage release, calling the killing a “murder,” The Guardian reported. If you put your hands down, they shoot,” the report quotes state Rep. Edgar Gonzalez saying on the chamber floor. The report cites research showing that Latino residents are killed by police at a rate 6 times higher than white residents. “Despite repeated calls for police accountability and systemic reform, Latino and Black youth continue to be killed by police,” García continued in his statement. Even before the release of the body cam footage, Chicago police had omitted key details about the child in statements to the media and public.
Battleground Baltimore: Protests Against Police and For Tenants’ Rights
Baltimore police officers diverted traffic as the group walked along city roadways. That’s because “rental security insurance” is really a surety bond which can easily trap tenants in fees they can never escape. The Baltimore Brew has, as it often does, consistently and thoughtfully covered this important and kind of confusing controversy. “We dropped those banners because, in Baltimore and elsewhere, tenants like us are ignored in favor of business interests,” one of the people involved in dropping the banners told Battleground Baltimore. “On Scott’s desk, a bill pitched as helping renters that renters’ advocates denounce,” Baltimore Brew.
Cities Drop Most Charges Against BLM Protesters as Cops Fail to Provide Evidence
In Houston and Los Angeles, The Guardian found, 93 percent of charges were either dropped or never filed; in some cities like Dallas and Philadelphia, that number rose to 95 percent of charges dropped or never prosecuted. Instead, officers filed felony charges like assault and looting with no evidence, ultimately forcing the charges to be dropped or dismissed. The high proportion of charges being dropped is also a stark illustration of how left-wing protesters are punished or face the threat of punishment much more often than right-wing protesters. An analysis of protests from last year found that police are three times more likely to use force against left-wing protesters than right-wing ones. There’s evidence that protest suppression, especially against left-wing protesters in the U.S. and internationally, is getting worse.
Minn. lawmaker proposes revoking convicted protesters' student loans, food stamps
A Minnesota lawmaker introduced legislation to punish any person convicted of crimes in connection with a protest by making them ineligible for state government assistance — including food stamps, student loans, unemployment benefits and health care. The legislation, authored by Republican state Sen. David Osmek, would affect a litany of state programs. It faces a difficult path to become law because the state House and governor's office are controlled by Democrats. The Minnesota state Senate is under GOP control but the state House and governorship are held by Democrats. Among a number of other measures, the bill stiffens criminal penalties for crimes committed amid protests that become violent.
Billions spent on coronavirus fight, but what happens next?
Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the last decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Health departments carry out essential government functions — such as managing water safety, issuing death certificates, tracking sexually transmitted diseases and preparing for infectious outbreaks. Compounding those losses, the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion.
What racism in theater looks like, and how to dismantle it
The Next Act: Creating antiracist theater Share Email to a Friend Embed Globe critic Don Aucoin talks with four leading Black theater artists about their experiences and insights. It starts really, really early, because there were places in which my young heart and mind was really interested, and really desired to be, in the world of theater. I think that’s the responsibility of who makes the theater but also of who goes to the theater as well. Because I think theater is able to do many, many things, not just entertain, and possibly enter into a lot of different types of conversations. Bobbitt: I think theater can support the cultural shift.
McClain accuses Maxine Waters of inciting violence in Minnesota
Washington — Republican U.S. Rep. Lisa McClain is slamming Democratic colleague, Maxine Waters, for saying that supporters of racial justice and Black Lives Matter should "get more confrontational." Shortly after, Pelosi told reporters that Waters did not need to apologize for what she said, but that McClain should. Asked if Waters' comments incite violence, Pelosi replied, "absolutely not." “I talk about confronting the justice system, confronting the policing that’s going on, I’m talking about speaking up. I’m talking about elected officials doing what needs to be done to control their budgets and to pass legislation," Waters said.
Ohio State students angered by ChittFest damages, police response
Partiers cause major damage at ChittFestChittenden Avenue residents, many of whom are Ohio State students, are no strangers to block parties. Wollett, president of Ohio State's mental health group Never Walk Alone, said she wasn't the only one upset by the damage. Other group members were messaging all day Sunday about ChittFest and how angry they were that students would do this to other students. "A lot of people are angry that fellow students would flip another student's car for fun, so to see people come together to make things right is cool," said Chris Emmett, an OSU sophomore and member of Never Walk Alone. She wondered why officers didn't respond to students destroying property the same way they responded to Black Lives Matter protesters over the summer.
Jen Psaki refuses to condemn Maxine Waters for her call to BLM to be 'more confrontational'
White House press secretary Jen Psaki wouldn't condemn Rep. Maxine Waters for saying Black Lives Matter protesters should 'get more confrontational' if Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is found not guilty. White House press secretary Jen Psaki was asked about Waters comments and didn't condemn them. A bullet hole is seen in the windshield of a Minnesota National Guard vehicle that was targeted in a drive-by shooting early on Sunday. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting.
Opinion: What we know so far about Adam Toledo's death is unacceptable
They were protesting the killing of Adam Toledo, 13, by a police officer in the early morning hours of March 29. While many questions remain, much of what we know so far is unacceptable. Yet Officer Stillman acted as judge, jury and executioner. A lawyer for Officer Stillman said that Adam's shooting was justified, given the nature of the threat. This statement is correct: Officer Stillman made the decision to shoot Adam.
Leaders of Proud Boys ordered jailed on Capitol riot charges
FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Proud Boys members Joseph Biggs, left, and Ethan Nordean, right with megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Biggs and Nordean are among more than two dozen Capitol riot defendants who have been described by federal authorities as Proud Boys leaders, members or associates. Last month’s indictment charged Biggs, Nordean and two other men described as Proud Boys leaders with conspiring to impede Congress’ certification of the Electoral College vote. Nordean, 30, of Auburn, Washington, has been a Proud Boys chapter president and member of the group’s national “Elders Council.” Biggs, 37, of Ormond Beach, Florida, is a self-described Proud Boys organizer. Several Proud Boys also entered the Capitol building itself after the mob smashed windows and forced open doors.
Proud Boys leaders ordered jailed on Capitol riot charges
Biggs and Nordean are among more than two dozen Capitol riot defendants who have been described by federal authorities as Proud Boys leaders, members or associates. Last month’s indictment charged Biggs, Nordean and two other men described as Proud Boys leaders with conspiring to impede Congress’ certification of the Electoral College vote. Nordean, 30, of Auburn, Washington, has been a Proud Boys chapter president and member of the group’s national “Elders Council.” Biggs, 37, of Ormond Beach, Florida, is a self-described Proud Boys organizer. Proud Boys members describe themselves as a politically incorrect men’s club for “Western chauvinists.” Its members frequently have engaged in street fights with antifascist activists at rallies and protests. Several Proud Boys also entered the Capitol building itself after the mob smashed windows and forced open doors.
Leaders of Proud Boys ordered jailed on Capitol riot charges
Biggs and Nordean are among more than two dozen Capitol riot defendants who have been described by federal authorities as Proud Boys leaders, members or associates. Last month’s indictment charged Biggs, Nordean and two other men described as Proud Boys leaders with conspiring to impede Congress’ certification of the Electoral College vote. Nordean, 30, of Auburn, Washington, has been a Proud Boys chapter president and member of the group’s national “Elders Council.” Biggs, 37, of Ormond Beach, Florida, is a self-described Proud Boys organizer. Proud Boys members describe themselves as a politically incorrect men’s club for “Western chauvinists.” Its members frequently have engaged in street fights with antifascist activists at rallies and protests. Several Proud Boys also entered the Capitol building itself after the mob smashed windows and forced open doors.
Waters says GOP is trying to 'send a message to white supremacists' by criticizing her comments
On Sunday, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy threatened to bring 'action' against Waters after she joined protesters in Minnesota on Saturday night. A bullet hole is seen in the windshield of a Minnesota National Guard vehicle that was targeted in a drive-by shooting early on Sunday. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
Maxine Waters just made a volatile situation much, much worse
"I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty," she said in response to reporters' questions . Waters said that if Chauvin is not found guilty -- closing arguments in the case began Monday -- then "we've got to get more confrontational." "Maxine Waters is inciting violence in Minneapolis — just as she has incited it in the past," tweeted House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy , a California Republican. And because almost 150 House Republicans voted to oppose the Electoral College results after that riot. Waters is wrong for encouraging confrontation and violence in a situation that requires the exact opposite of our leaders.
Security tightens in Minneapolis and nationwide ahead of jury deliberations in the Derek Chauvin trial
MINNEAPOLIS — Security continues tightening across the region and nationwide as jurors are set to begin deliberations in the murder trial of former police office Derek Chauvin. Video shown to jurors shows Chauvin, who was swiftly fired, kneeling on Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds. Both sides in the Chauvin prosecution gave their closing arguments Monday, and the 12-member jury will be sequestered in a secure location during their deliberations. "As appropriate and as they are comfortable, teachers will give students the opportunity to process their feelings, how this feels to them personally and how they are impacted by having the eyes of the world on Minneapolis," Minneapolis Public Schools Superintendent Ed Graff said in a letter to parents. More:Here are the jurors who will decide whether Derek Chauvin is guilty of murder
Colorado judge who repeatedly said N-word, declared ‘all lives matter’ resigns
A Colorado judge has resigned after repeatedly using the N-word while talking to a black court official and proclaiming “all lives matter” in the aftermath of George Floyd’s police-involved death. Colorado District Judge Natalie T. Chase agreed to step down from the bench Friday after she was censured by the Colorado Supreme Court for her comments. “Judge Chase then, while wearing her robe and sitting on the bench, told the employees some of her opinions regarding racial justice,” according to Friday’s order. “The employee tried to explain the Black Lives Matter movement, and Judge Chase stated that she believes all lives matter.”However, Chase also acknowledged that she believed the conduct of the Minneapolis police officers should be probed. Just four judges had been publicly censured in Colorado between 2010 and 2020, according to the Denver Post.
DeSantis signs Florida’s anti-riot bill, cites Chauvin trial
His office confirmed Wednesday, April 7, 2021 that the Republican governor got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which requires only a single dose. Ron DeSantis gestures during a news conference Sunday, April 4, 2021, at the Manatee County Emergency Management office in Palmetto, Fla. DeSantis has received a single-dose coronavirus vaccine. His office confirmed Wednesday, April 7, 2021 that the Republican governor got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which requires only a single dose. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Monday to create tougher penalties for people who participate in violent protests. The so-called anti-riot bill was a response to protests around the country because of police violence against African-Americans.
Reporter's Notebook: Impressions Of A City As Derek Chauvin's Trial Nears Its End
Reporter's Notebook: Impressions Of A City As Derek Chauvin's Trial Nears Its EndEnlarge this image toggle caption Jim Mone/AP Jim Mone/APHigh fences, razor wire, Jersey barriers, armed troops. Instead, it's the checkpoint set up more than a month ago on a city street just outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis. The National Guard was ordered up for this task and others even before jury selection began in the Derek Chauvin trial. Like so many places in recent weeks, the Walker fulfills a need, a distraction from both the Chauvin trial and the pandemic. This place is 11 miles from the Chauvin trial with a universe of diversions and digressions from his criminal case.
Florida Adopts Nation's Toughest Restrictions On Protests
Florida Adopts Nation's Toughest Restrictions On ProtestsEnlarge this image toggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFlorida's Governor has signed a law that he called the "strongest anti-rioting, pro-law enforcement measure in the country." It provides new protections for police and increases the penalties for people who take part in property damage or violence during protests. Florida experienced little of the violence seen elsewhere in the country last summer following Floyd's death. The law makes local officials in Florida liable to lawsuits from injured parties if they are found to have not done enough to respond to control violent protests. Nailah Summers, with Dream Defenders, one of the groups that was active in organizing protests in Florida said the law disproportionately affects minority communities.
Chicago's Little Village divided over police shooting of 13-year-old
Demonstrators protest the shooting of 13-year-old Adam Toledo, Friday, April 16, 2021, in Logan Park in Chicago. On Sunday, several local groups organized an afternoon protest against police brutality and an evening peace march through Little Village. Police would stop me and rough me up,” he said while eating a mangonada Saturday outside Azucar, a Little Village Mexican ice cream shop. Little Village activist Jose Manuel Almanza Jr. sees the community divided over Adam Toledo's shooting by police. Paco Amador and son Daniel, 14, near their home in Chicago's Little Village.
DeSantis signs Florida's anti-riot bill, cites Chauvin trial
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida's top Republicans cited events in cities around the country — but not the Jan. 6 riots in Washington — as Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Monday to create tougher penalties for people who participate in violent protests. The so-called anti-riot bill was a response to protests around the country because of police violence against African-Americans. Opponents of the bill said it was a racist reaction to a problem that hasn’t occurred in Florida. “The governor made no mention of the Jan. 6 insurrection.”He also noted that the governor made mention of the Chauvin trial with the expectation that there could be protests if Chauvin is acquitted.
DeSantis signs so-called anti-riot bill in Florida, cites Chauvin trial
The so-called anti-riot bill was a response to protests around the country because of police violence against African-Americans. TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida’s top Republicans cited events in cities around the country — but not the Jan. 6 riots in Washington — as Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Monday to create tougher penalties for people who participate in violent protests. AdvertisementOpponents of the bill said it was a racist reaction to a problem that hasn’t occurred in Florida. “The governor made no mention of the Jan. 6 insurrection.”He also noted that the governor made mention of the Chauvin trial with the expectation that there could be protests if Chauvin is acquitted.
White Louisville cop punches BLM protester and breaks his glasses for 'flexing' during arrest
A white police officer was filmed punching a Black Lives Matter protester four times and breaking the man's glasses while accusing him of resisting arrest. In the video, an officer attempting to handcuff Garrett tells him several times to 'stop flexing.' It added that afterwards the officer took Garrett to the ground and 'delivered 2-3 closed hand strikes' to his face. Garrett is seen above being led away in handcuffs by police officers in Louisville on SundayGarrett has frequently taken part in demonstrations in Louisville. Hendricks said she watched the arrest and didn't see Garrett resisting the officers.
Maxine Waters rips GOP criticism: 'I'm not going to be bullied'
Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) ripped GOP lawmakers in a Monday interview, saying they were trying to "send a message" to white supremacists with their criticism of her. Waters told the Grio she is "not worried that they’re going to continue to distort what I say." "We've got to get more confrontational," Waters told reporters according to Fox News. "Maxine Waters Maxine Moore WatersMarjorie Taylor Greene to introduce resolution to expel Maxine Waters Waters: Fauci 'was being bullied' by Jordan during hearing Maxine Waters cuts off Jim Jordan, Fauci sparring at hearing: 'Shut your mouth' MORE is inciting violence in Minneapolis — just as she has incited it in the past," McCarthy said in a tweet. McCarthy spoke after GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.) on Sunday announced plans to introduce a resolution to expel Waters from Congress for the remarks.
Billions spent on coronavirus fight, but what happens next?
Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. By the time the coronavirus pandemic hit, it paid for about 10. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the past decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Compounding those losses, the coronavirus pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion.
Derek Chauvin trial live updates: In closing arguments, prosecutor says Chauvin 'chose pride over policing' in George Floyd's death
MINNEAPOLIS — Attorneys for the prosecution and defense in the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, charged in George Floyd's death, were presenting their closing arguments Monday. He did not trip and fall and find himself on George Floyd’s neck," Schleicher said, adding, "Believe your eyes. "George Floyd's final words on May 25, 2020, were: 'Please, I can't breathe.' "Would but for the defendant's actions, pushing him down, would George Floyd have died that day?" "It is not necessary for the state to prove the defendant had an intent to kill George Floyd.
Billions spent on coronavirus fight, but what happens next?
Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the past decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Health departments carry out essential government functions — such as managing water safety, issuing death certificates, tracking sexually transmitted diseases and preparing for infectious outbreaks. Compounding those losses, the coronavirus pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion.
Jane Austen museum launches BLM-inspired 'interrogation' of author's love for drinking tea
A museum devoted to Jane Austen has sparked fury by announcing plans to subject the author to a 'historical interrogation' over alleged links to the slave trade. Staff at a museum devoted to 18th century author Jane Austen are now re-evaluating her place in 'Regency era colonialism', including her love of tea drinking. Another proposed display that talks about her abolitionist views will state that 'Black Lives Matter to Jane Austen'. Twitter user Sophie suggested she would buy 'an entire Jane Austen collection before they’re all burnt.' Jane Austen Memorial Trust raised funds to buy the house in 1947, and it opened to the public two years later.
Florida Gov DeSantis signs new anti-riot bill
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has signed a new anti-riot bill into law on the same day as closing arguments in the Derek Chauvin trial over George Floyd's death. DeSantis signed the bill, officially known as HB 1, on Monday at a press conference at the Polk County Sheriff's Office headquarters. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed the anti-riot bill, officially known as HB 1, on Monday at a press conference at the Polk County Sheriff's Office headquarters'This bill protects all monuments in Florida. The bill builds on several measures DeSantis introduced last summer as a response to the violent protests following George Floyd's death at the hands of police. In Minneapolis, where the trial is taking place, the city is already taking precautions in case of unrest.
BLM protesters rally for victim, leave after learning he was white carjacker
Black Lives Matter protesters in Minnesota dropped to a knee and set off to march over a fatal police shooting — just to return when they learned it was a white carjacker who had fired at police, according to reports. “Protestors kneel after hearing there was an officer-involved shooting in Burnsville moments ago,” Hicks tweeted of the wild caught-on-camera armed carjacking in the suburbs. Black Lives Matter marchers knelt for the victim of a police shooting, reportedly until they learned the victim was a white carjacker who shot at police. Word of their planned protest after a rush to judgment quickly had the protesters ripped online. The Burnsville carjacker has yet to be identified.
‘Prejudice’ exposed? Jane Austen’s links to slavery ‘interrogated’
Historians are spilling the tea over Jane Austen’s connections with slave plantations. Getty ImagesThe director of Jane Austen’s House museum, Lizzie Dunford, told the Telegraph that they intend to spotlight this little-discussed aspect of Austen’s personal story. Jane Austen’s family were no exception,” Dunford continued. In light of this, curators are also planning a display dubbed “Black Lives Matter to Jane Austen,” to highlight her abolitionist references. Jane Austen is said to have written about her distaste for slavery in later works.
Detroit police chief slams Rashida Tlaib: 'I'd love to see her resign'
REPUBLICANS SLAM MAXINE WATERS FOR TELLING PROTESTERS TO 'GET MORE CONFRONTATIONAL' OVER CHAUVIN TRIAL"She's reckless," Craig told Fox 2 Detroit on Sunday. "When you talk about abolishing police, incarceration, when you talk about safe cities – what do you think the residents in Detroit want? "I will not let someone like a Tlaib or a Maxine Waters paint our profession with a broad brush. "One would think Chief Craig has more important things to do." In July 2020, he pushed back against her claims that Detroit police officers abused peaceful protesters.
An 'enormous burden': Chauvin trial jurors will face scrutiny — no matter their verdict
"This reminds me so much of my time and what we were going through," King Jr., 78, said. "They're going to be going through a lot," he said of the jurors in Chauvin's trial. Her advice to jurors in the Chauvin trial: "Whatever choice you make, regardless of who thinks it's right or wrong, if you know your choice is right, just stand by it." To the jurors in the Chauvin trial, she said, "if you're feeling overwhelmed, don't allow yourself to sit back and wallow in it." Many, like King Jr., tried to put the events behind them.
'We Need To Be Nurtured, Too': Many Teachers Say They're Reaching A Breaking Point
'We Need To Be Nurtured, Too': Many Teachers Say They're Reaching A Breaking PointEnlarge this image Ryan Raphael for NPR Ryan Raphael for NPRTo say Leah Juelke is an award-winning teacher is a bit of an understatement. "Having teachers feel safe and supported in their school environments is essential to students learning and being successful." Teachers told NPR they force themselves to take breaks and go for a bike ride or call a friend. But most of the educators NPR spoke with say they're so exhausted, that even self-care feels like one additional thing to do. Many teachers say they are eating and drinking more, and exercising and sleeping less.
Derek Chauvin trial live updates: In closing arguments, prosecutor says Chauvin 'chose pride over policing' in George Floyd's death
MINNEAPOLIS — Attorneys for the prosecution and defense in the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, charged in George Floyd's death, were presenting their closing arguments Monday. He did not trip and fall and find himself on George Floyd’s neck," Schleicher said, adding, "Believe your eyes. "George Floyd's final words on May 25, 2020, were: 'Please, I can't breathe.' "It is not necessary for the state to prove the defendant had an intent to kill George Floyd. "If I were you, I would plan for long (deliberations) and hope for short," Cahill told jurors Thursday.
Judge resigns after repeatedly using n-word
A judge in Colorado resigned after she was censured for repeatedly using the n-word. Incidents included frequently using the n-word in front of Black colleagues, and asking a Black court facilitator “why Black people can use the n-word but not white people”. Ms Chase, who is white, continued by asking “whether it was different if the n-word is said with an ‘er’ or an 'a' at the end of the word”. Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent.
Billions spent on coronavirus fight, but what happens next?
Dr. Mysheika W. Roberts, the health commissioner for Columbus Public Health, poses for a portrait in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Even the federal Prevention and Public Health Fund , which was established with the Affordable Care Act to provide $2 billion a year for public health, was raided for cash over the past decade. If the money hadn’t been touched, eventually local and state health departments would have gotten an additional $12.4 billion. Compounding those losses, the coronavirus pandemic has prompted an exodus of public health officials because of harassment, political pressure and exhaustion.
Report: NBA prepared to postpone games after Derek Chauvin murder trial verdict
The NBA is prepared to postpone games in response to the upcoming verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reports. Chauvin faces second- and third-degree murder charges and a second-degree manslaughter charge after George Floyd died in police custody last May. Prior to Floyd's death, Chauvin kneeled on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes amid repeated pleas from Floyd that he couldn't breathe. The Derek Chauvin Trial has sparked renewed social unrest in Minnesota. (Chris Tuite/ImageSPACE/MediaPunch /IPX)As tension mounted around the Chauvin trial, another police-involved killing of a Black man shook the Minneapolis area last week.
George Floyd brother’s message for America: ‘You have the right to be angry but express it peacefully’
No words can adequately explain what this past year has been like for Terrence Floyd and the other members of George Floyd’s family. But don’t express it in a violent way, express it in a peaceful way.”He adds: “Show the people out there that think we’re animals, we’re not. This is my message — keep it peaceful.”Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice Thanks for signing up to the News newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Floyd, 44, says because of his brother’s death, and because of what has happened, he needs to use his platform to push for change.
UK race report attempted to normalise white supremacy: UN experts
A body of experts that advises the United Nations on human rights concerns has criticised a government-backed report that concluded there was no systemic racism in the United Kingdom. “The report cites dubious evidence to make claims that rationalise white supremacy by using the familiar arguments that have always justified racial hierarchy,” the Geneva-based working group said. The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, which was set up by United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson after last year’s Black Lives Matter protests, published its report on racism last month. Its conclusions that the United Kingdom is not “institutionally racist” or “rigged” against minorities have been widely denounced. UK gov’t rejects criticismJohnson’s government rejected the criticism, with a spokesman for the prime minister saying the UN group’s conclusions misrepresented the report.
A conviction looks likely in the George Floyd case, but also an appeal
That they were much likely to get a conviction on manslaughter rather than murder. The prosecution will argue that callous indifference and a knee injudiciously applied to George Floyd’s neck by an armed instrument of the state should result in a murder conviction. George Floyd’s death sparked protests against racial injustice and police brutality around the world. Derek Chauvin was charged in the death of George Floyd after video of him kneeling on Floyd’s neck during the arrest surfaced. APThe Chauvin jurors are only partially sequestered and Cahill denied the defense motion for a change of venue.
Power Up: Democrats start massive lift of drafting Biden's infrastructure proposal by aiming to redress highway system
Although Harris has yet to explicitly highlight as much, her policy footprint threads through the far-reaching infrastructure proposal. As a senator, Harris co-sponsored several of the bills and investments incorporated into Biden’s infrastructure effort, including the plan’s proposed $111 billion investment in water infrastructure and $100 billion investment in high-speed broadband infrastructure. Just the start: The painstaking task of turning the rest of Biden's $2.25 trillion infrastructure blueprint into legislation is just beginning. Republicans, meanwhile, are working on a bipartisan alternative, which the White House has said it's waiting for. coronavirusan ambitious plan on the scale the White House wantsThe White House says it wants a bipartisan deal , but Democrats are preparing to move ahead alone if necessary.
Derek Chauvin trial, recent shootings add pressure on Biden to seek police reform
During the trial, another Black man, Daunte Wright, was shot and killed by police officer Kimberly Potter in nearby Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, sparking protests. Potter, who claimed that she thought she was using a Taser, has since resigned and been charged with second-degree manslaughter. Black and Latino people accounted for more than half of those killed during that period, the Times said. Biden, who pledged to overhaul the nation's criminal justice system during his presidential campaign, has in his first months done little to please those hoping for reform. "I would say this is an issue that will be a cause of President Biden's time in office," Psaki said.
FMIA: Whispers, Rumors and Gut Feelings as 2021 NFL Draft Nears
The average team has 8.1 picks in an NFL draft, including Compensatory Picks. Scattering some other observations:• “DeVonta Smith is one of the best football players I’ve ever seen,” said one GM. This bill, he thinks, would not just benefit the college quarterback and stars on the basketball team. Tweets of the Week 50IWith QBs virtually locked in at the top three picks, the NFL Draft really starts at No. The event would have brought together a slew of fantasy fans and 100 NFL players at a Vegas event center contiguous to a casino.
UN experts slam UK report for repackaging ‘racist tropes’
Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said Monday April 19, 2021 that it found it “stunning” that the report “repackages racist tropes and stereotypes into fact” and urged the British government to reject its findings. Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said Monday April 19, 2021 that it found it “stunning” that the report “repackages racist tropes and stereotypes into fact” and urged the British government to reject its findings. Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said Monday that it found it “stunning” that the report “repackages racist tropes and stereotypes into fact” and urged the British government to reject its findings. “The report cites dubious evidence to make claims that rationalize white supremacy by using the familiar arguments that have always justified racial hierarchy,” the Geneva-based working group said. Johnson’s spokesman, Max Blain, said the U.N. working group’s statement “misrepresents the findings” of the U.K. racism report.
Black Lives Matter fence in Minnesota at center of row in city on edge
“We didn’t want to stir a pot, it wasn’t about angering neighbors or aggravating anyone or trying to get under anyone’s skin,” Weyandt told the Guardian. Photograph: John Minchillo/APHowever the authorities of West St Paul had other ideas. “The ordinance Ryan’s fence violates isn’t one about signs; the ordinance is about fences,” said West St Paul city council member Wendy Berry last week. The fence ordinance prohibits fences from being more than one color or containing images or letters. These included one known as the non-commercial signs ordinance, which effectively bars public displays of messages that can be interpreted as political, unless it’s within a specified election cycle, and the signs ordinance which bars signs from being attached to fences.
Republicans demand action against Maxine Waters after Minneapolis remarks
Photograph: John Minchillo/AP However the authorities of West St Paul had other ideas. “The ordinance Ryan’s fence violates isn’t one about signs; the ordinance is about fences,” said West St Paul city council member Wendy Berry last week. The fence ordinance prohibits fences from being more than one color or containing images or letters. These included one known as the non-commercial signs ordinance, which effectively bars public displays of messages that can be interpreted as political, unless it’s within a specified election cycle, and the signs ordinance which bars signs from being attached to fences. In a mind-boggling train of events, Weyandt explained that he only recently learned that he was also in violation of the fence ordinance.
Jane Austen was not a colonialist – this ‘reinterpretation’ is absurd
The museum notes all of this, and says that Austen “reveals her social conscience in her reading and her writing”. In fact, there’s something perverse about people who are supposed to be guardians of her work playing at right-on politics. What Jane Austen finds unappealing – passion, rule-breaking and attitude – are exactly the things that Jane Eyre seeks. There are reports that Jane Austen’s House is considering a panel called “Black Lives Matter to Jane Austen”. Austen didn’t set her novels in the plantations of the Caribbean; she didn’t write openly abolitionist characters; she didn’t fold anti-slavery polemics into her gossipy dialogue.
Kevin McCarthy threatens to 'bring action' against Maxine Waters for 'inciting violence'
Kevin McCarthy threatened to bring 'action' against California Representative Maxine Waters after she joined protesters in Minnesota on Saturday night and urged the crowd to 'get more confrontational'. In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured - although not seriously - in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. According to NBC Philadelphia, crowds in that city walked through City Center towards City Hall peacefully in a protest that lasted around five hours. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
5 reasons I’m hopeful about diversity, equity, and inclusion in corporate America
Here are five reasons I’m optimistic (on most days) about the future of IDEB in the workplace. More CEOs appear personally committed According to Fortune/Deloitte’s 2021 CEO Survey, 90% of CEOs reported that diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is a strategic and personal priority. People are starting to see everything through an inclusive lens Many companies traditionally viewed workforce diversity through a hiring lens. I’m starting to see more companies and IDEB leaders think about this work through the lens of the entire employee life cycle. Recently, Chipotle announced that it will tie executive compensation to annual targets aimed at improving the company’s internal diversity and sustainability.
Jane Austen was not a colonialist – this ‘reinterpretation’ is absurd
The museum notes all of this, and says that Austen “reveals her social conscience in her reading and her writing”. In fact, there’s something perverse about people who are supposed to be guardians of her work playing at right-on politics. What Jane Austen finds unappealing – passion, rule-breaking and attitude – are exactly the things that Jane Eyre seeks. There are reports that the museum is considering a panel called “Black Lives Matter to Jane Austen”. Austen didn’t set her novels in the plantations of the Caribbean; she didn’t write openly abolitionist characters; she didn’t fold anti-slavery polemics into her gossipy dialogue.
10 classic children’s books every family should read together
Following his efforts to tackle child food poverty, Marcus Rashford has unveiled his latest campaign to improve the lives of kids in the UK, a book club that will see Macmillan Children’s Books donate 50,000 free books through children’s food charity Magic Breakfast. Starting in June with illustrated adventure A Dinosaur Ate My Sister by Pooja Puri, the campaign wants to highlight the joy of reading for pleasure, and the way books can help kids “escape reality from time to time”, Rashford says. INDY/ LIFE Newsletter Be inspired with the latest lifestyle trends every week Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the INDY/LIFE newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice INDY/ LIFE Newsletter Be inspired with the latest lifestyle trends every week Thanks for signing up to the INDY/LIFE newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Little Women by Louisa May AlcottOne of the most enduring children’s novels, Little Women was first published in 1868 and remains a coming-of-age classic to this day.
Racism report: United Nations says UK report is 'reprehensible' and 'normalises white supremacy'
A human rights attorney who has focused 'heavily on racial justice, non-discrimination, and human rights advocacy', Day describes herself on Twitter as a 'racial justice accelerator'. Michal Balcerzak Michal Balcerzak Michal Balcerzak is a professor of international human rights law at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland. His research areas include international human rights law, protection of national minorities, international judiciary and litigation and diplomatic protocol. A member of the Philippine Bar, he has litigated human rights cases for over 24 years before various international and domestic courts and tribunals, such as the United Nations Human Rights Committee and Philippine Supreme Court. 'In other words, institutional racism, structural invisibility, and longstanding inequalities have disproportionately impacted people of African descent living in the UK.
Jane Austen museum launches BLM-inspired 'interrogation' of author's love for drinking tea
Jane Austen's love of tea drinking will be subjected to 'historical interrogation' by a museum over claims this links her to the slave trade. Austen has links to the slave trade through her father George Austen, the rector for a nearby parish who was at one point a trustee for an Antigua sugar plantation. Staff at a museum devoted to 18th century author Jane Austen are now re-evaluating her place in 'Regency era colonialism', including her love of tea drinking. The move towards greater transparency in Austen's slavery links comes in the wake of Black Lives Matter protests sparked by the killing of unarmed black man George Floyd in Minneapolis last year. Another proposed display that talks about her abolitionist views will state that 'Black Lives Matter to Jane Austen'.
Colorado judge resigns after repeatedly using the n-word
'The Family Court Facilitator was uncomfortable because she could not leave the car or leave the conversation,' the court's opinion wrote. 'The Family Court Facilitator did not feel free to express her discomfort or emotions due to fear of retaliation by Judge Chase,' the opinion read. 'Judge Chase asked one employee some questions about the Black Lives Matter movement,' the opinion stated. 'The employee tried to explain the Black Lives Matter movement, and Judge Chase stated that she believes all lives matter. Judge Chase also stated that the conduct of the police officers in the George Floyd matter should be investigated.'
The Case for Black Patriotism
Does this posture serve the interests, rightly understood, of black Americans? Indeed, a case can be made that the correct narrative to adopt today is one of unabashed black patriotism—a forthright embrace of American nationalism by black people. Black Americans’ birthright citizenship in what is arguably history’s greatest republic is an inheritance of immense value. The influence of black people on the culture of America is stunning and has global resonance. Some 40 million strong, black Americans are the richest and most powerful population of African descent on the planet.
Progressives put Democrats on defense
Democrats are distancing themselves from high-profile progressive priorities as they threaten to push the party off message. Progressives’ decision to bring two issues back into the national spotlight this week — defunding the police and expanding the Supreme Court — have forced other Democrats to go on defense as they field questions about ideas that suck up a lot of political oxygen but get little legislative traction on Capitol Hill. unveiled legislation to expand the Supreme Court from nine justices to 13 justices. We're putting together the infrastructure bill and the rest,” Pelosi said. Republicans, who have struggled to gain traction against Biden, view the detours offered by progressives this week as prime political fodder.
Derek Chauvin's trial is a teachable moment. Here's how classrooms are discussing it.
That's especially true amid renewed protests in response to a police shooting of a Black man in the Minneapolis area. Over the course of the semester, Lew, who's Asian American, noticed that her white students have become more inclined to pause before they speak. High school senior Bailey Evans-William This is not something you're taking a political stance on – it's not something we have to argue about. The day after Brown was shot, Harris, a Black man, had his students examine the burgeoning Black Lives Matter movement. It wasn't long before a parent of one of his few white students called the school's principal to complain.
Trump's NSA general counsel Michael Ellis resigns, never having taken office
Tim Walz (D) spoke out Sunday over allegations that journalists covering unrest in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center have endured police violence, telling CBS Minnesota: "Apologies are not enough, it just cannot happen. ""Following feedback from media, and in light of a recent temporary restraining order ... MSP will not photograph journalists or their credentials," the statement said. "In addition, MSP will no longer include messaging at the scene advising media where they can go to safely cover events. "While journalists have been detained and released during enforcement actions after providing credentials, no journalists have been arrested. I’ve directed our law enforcement partners to make changes that will help ensure journalists do not face barriers to doing their jobs.
In the Roaring Twenties, Ads Make a Comeback
The astonishing rise of subscription digital media is part of a broader rush toward the reliable, direct-to-consumer economics that has captivated investors. The most successful new entrant to the digital advertising market is Amazon, which now devours more than 10 percent of the country’s digital advertising business by charging merchants to promote their own products on its marketplace. “We haven’t seen digital advertising growth in high double digits since maybe 2017.”And it’s not just advertising. And paradoxically, one of the forces driving the digital advertising boom is the shift toward subscriptions that was supposed to replace advertising revenue. “But we’ll enjoy it while it does.”The post In the Roaring Twenties, Ads Make a Comeback appeared first on New York Times.
Black Lives Matter fence in Minnesota at center of row in city on edge
“We didn’t want to stir a pot, it wasn’t about angering neighbors or aggravating anyone or trying to get under anyone’s skin,” Weyandt told the Guardian. Photograph: John Minchillo/APHowever the authorities of West St Paul had other ideas. “The ordinance Ryan’s fence violates isn’t one about signs; the ordinance is about fences,” said West St Paul city council member Wendy Berry last week. The fence ordinance prohibits fences from being more than one color or containing images or letters. These included one known as the non-commercial signs ordinance, which effectively bars public displays of messages that can be interpreted as political, unless it’s within a specified election cycle, and the signs ordinance which bars signs from being attached to fences.
Republicans fret over divisive candidates
Republicans are sounding the alarm that divisive candidates running across the country could cost them key Senate and gubernatorial races next year. The party is concerned that disruptive contenders could hurt their chances of keeping Senate seats in Missouri, Alabama and Wisconsin and flipping the governor’s mansion in Virginia. Republicans are also nervously watching primaries for open Senate seats in North Carolina and Ohio and Democratic-held seats in Arizona and Georgia. “Eric Greitens has some folks scared, and he is a disaster of a general election candidate,” said one national GOP strategist. But the GOP is desperate to not repeat past mistakes when deeply flawed candidates cost them winnable Senate seats.
U.N. experts scathing about "tone-deaf" UK report on racial equality
U.N. human rights experts on Monday rejected a review commissioned by Britain's government into race inequality as an attempt to "normalise white supremacy despite considerable research and evidence of institutional racism". read moreThe experts said the report used familiar arguments to justify racial hierarchy. "This attempt to normalise white supremacy despite considerable research and evidence of institutional racism is an unfortunate sidestepping of the opportunity to acknowledge the atrocities of the past and the contributions of all in order to move forward,” they said. They denounced the report's "mythical representation of enslavement" as a bid to sanitise the history of trade in enslaved Africans by the former colonial power. U.N. rights watchdogs, following visits in the last decade, have highlighted deep-rooted inequities health, education, employment, housing and criminal justice, they said.
Republicans lean into uphill battle against 2 little-known Biden nominees
Kristen Clarke delivers remarks after being nominated to be civil rights division assistant attorney general. ), a close Biden ally, suggested that some Republicans on the panel are “getting sharper and more partisan." Clarke is on leave as head of the Lawyers’ Committee on Civil Rights Under Law and is a well-known voting rights advocate. 3 spot at DOJ while Clarke would be the first Senate-confirmed woman of color to lead its civil rights division. Despite the turbulence they're facing from Republicans, both nominees are likely to get confirmed.
In New York City, Big Tech Is Bailing Out Big Real Estate
On April 11 last year, the United States surpassed Italy in terms of COVID-19 fatalities, with New York City accounting for the bulk of the country’s deaths. The story of New York City’s pandemic spring has been told many times over. The word “epicenter” was used in compound constructions, describing neighborhoods like Corona, Queens, as “the epicenter of the epicenter of the epicenter.” There were constant sirens. Indeed, in the year from March 2020 to March 2021, New York City experienced a decade’s worth of change. The tenant movement has always been a major part of New York City politics, but it ramped up and expanded over the last year to fight for universal rent control.
Democrats Should Talk Even More About Defunding the Police
Subscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! For more from The Nation, check out our latest issueSubscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! If Democrats want to hold onto control of the House and Senate in 2022, they should talk more about defunding the police, not less. An underappreciated story of the election was the surge of Trump voters, an increase of 41,885 in Hidalgo. If Democrats double down on their advantage among young voters, they can have both justice for Floyd and a lasting majority in Congress.
Left Voice on the RWDSU debacle at Amazon: A lawyers’ brief for union executives
The humiliating rejection of the RWDSU by Amazon workers has produced a wave of rationalizations and apologetics from the pseudo-left attorneys for the RWDSU executives. Over the past several months, Left Voice has sought to portray the RWDSU campaign as a “historic opportunity” for the working class throughout the country. “This mailbox,” Left Voice writes, “installed in the dead of night, was central to Amazon’s union busting strategy. The history of violent class struggle in AmericaThe gist of Left Voice ’s argument is that the RWDSU lost the vote because Amazon opposed the union. After the laundry list of lawyers’ arguments on behalf of the RWDSU, Left Voice then turns to blaming the supposed backwardness of workers.
Chicago police crackdown on protests over police murder of 13-year-old Adam Toledo
Demonstrators marched en route to Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s residence in the Logan Square neighborhood, which swelled to thousands. Demonstrators protest the shooting of 13-year-old Adam Toledo, Friday, April 16, 2021, in Logan Park in Chicago. The footage shows Stillman pursuing Toledo on foot in an alleyway in Little Village after responding to reports of shots fired in the neighborhood. In the video, Stillman shouts at Toledo to drop the gun he is holding in his hand. After complying with Stillman’s orders to “show me your f*cking hands,” the footage shows Toledo unarmed with his hands raised turned to face Stillman.
Cruz blames Waters for ‘encouraging riots and violence’
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, took to Twitter Sunday to call out Rep. Maxine Waters for urging protesters in Minnesota to "get more confrontational" if Derek Chauvin is not convicted of murdering George Floyd. JOHN TURLEY: TRUMP VS. WATERS-- IN INCITEMENT CASE, SHE MAY BE BEST WITNESS IN EX-PRESIDENT'S DEFENSECruz responded to the remark on Twitter, saying, "Democrats actively encouraging riots & violence," Cruz tweeted with a link to a story about the California Democrat’s comments. MAXINE WATERS URGES MINNESOTA ANTI-POLICE CROWD TO ‘STAY ON THE STREET’ IF CHAUVIN ACQUITTEDThis is not the first time Republicans have accused Waters of stoking confrontations. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-G announced an effort Sunday to expel Waters from Congress.
Minneapolis boards up as Chauvin trial enters final phase and shooting of two National Guard in city
In the early hours of Sunday, two members of the National Guard were injured in a drive-by shooting. Hours after Waters' passionate speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. No team members were seriously injured, though two National Guard members suffered minor injuries: One was injured by shattered glass and taken to a local hospital, while the other suffered only superficial injuries. According to NBC Philadelphia, crowds in that city walked through City Center towards City Hall peacefully in a protest that lasted around five hours. Nevertheless, some businesses did board up and 1,000 National Guard troops were preemptively deployed.
Chicago Mayor Lightfoot under pressure to reform police amid outrage over Adam Toledo shooting
Lightfoot was elected mayor in 2019 as a first-time candidate for office who had recently served as president of the Chicago Police Board. In her nearly two years as mayor, Lightfoot has at times acknowledged the different realities of campaigning and governing. And the Toledo shooting again left Lightfoot responding to the actions of a police department she had pledged to reform. Lightfoot acknowledged Thursday that Chicago is "a city that is traumatized by a long history of police violence and misconduct." Lightfoot has also again called for new Chicago Police Department policies, this time seeking to limit when police conduct foot pursuits.
'We must show up no matter what': Foreboding air as people gather in George Floyd Square ahead of Derek Chauvin trial closing arguments
MINNEAPOLIS — More than a hundred people gathered in George Floyd Square Sunday afternoon for a rally to show solidarity between the Black and Asian communities ahead of closing arguments in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. We need to be our own protagonists.”Vo described the feeling ahead of the Chauvin verdict as “apprehensive, foreboding.”“I’m just really apprehensive either way,” he said. Chavin is charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd's death last Memorial Day. Seibert, 31, was visiting from Wisconsin but decided to stop by the square on the way from the airport. :Adam Toledo, Daunte Wright and George Floyd: Would more de-escalation training stop police from killing people?
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene calls for Rep. Waters' expulsion from Congress for inciting riot in Minnesota
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-G announced an effort Sunday to expel Rep. Maxine Waters from Congress after she told protesters in Minnesota to "get more confrontational" if Derek Chauvin isn't convicted of murdering George Floyd. "I'll be introducing a resolution to expel Rep. Maxine Waters from Congress for her continual incitement of violence," a statement from Taylor Greene's office reads. "As a sitting United States Congresswoman, Rep. Maxine Waters threatened a jury demanding a guilty verdict and threatened violence if Chauvin is found not guilty. This is also an abuse of power," she continued, before adding, "Rep. Maxine Waters must be expelled from Congress!" "Why is Maxine Waters traveling to a different state trying to incite a riot?
Chicago’s Little Village divided over police shooting of 13-year-old
On Sunday, several local groups organized an afternoon protest against police brutality and an evening peace march through Little Village. Police would stop me and rough me up,” he said while eating a mangonada Saturday outside Azucar, a Little Village Mexican ice cream shop. Little Village activist Jose Manuel Almanza Jr. sees the community divided over Adam Toledo’s shooting by police. Paco Amador and son Daniel, 14, near their home in Chicago’s Little Village. We say in Little Village that we’re stronger together.
Report: NBA prepared to postpone games after Derek Chauvin murder trial verdict
The NBA is prepared to postpone games in response to the upcoming verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek, ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reports. Chauvin faces second- and third-degree murder charges and a second-degree manslaughter charge after George Floyd died in police custody last May. Prior to Floyd's death, Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes amid repeated pleas from Floyd that he couldn't breath. The Derek Chauvin Trial has sparked renewed social unrest in Minnesota. (Chris Tuite/ImageSPACE/MediaPunch /IPX)As tension mounted around the Chauvin trial, another police-involved killing of a Black man shook the Minneapolis area last week.
Iowa House votes to increase penalties for protest-related crimes, broaden immunity for police
Iowa House lawmakers have passed a wide-ranging bill strengthening legal protections for police and raising penalties for protest-related offenses. "We listened to our courageous heroes in law enforcement and we took action," Klein said. Among the proposals are:Expanding qualified immunity: The bill would add a definition of "qualified immunity" to Iowa code. It would also expand the definition of unlawful assembly to include joining a lawful assembly but willingly remaining after that assembly becomes unlawful. It would also expand the definition of unlawful assembly to include joining a lawful assembly but willingly remaining after that assembly becomes unlawful.
CNN’s business model: Profit from fear, hate and division
Wow: It turns out CNN has made spreading fear and hate into its business model. In the tapes, Chester casually explains how his network preys on fear to squeeze out higher ratings. CNN President Jeff Zucker regularly called in on a special red phone call, for example, telling his “news” team to play up the COVID death toll whenever the regular news is too dull. He also brags that he went to the network in the first place to “be a part of” getting President Trump voted out of office. That’s right: The network not only intentionally spreads fear, it’s intent on feeding the nation’s political divisions, too.
Minneapolis braces for unrest as Derek Chauvin trial enters final phase
“You can’t even air out your apartment, because the s--- still keeps coming in.”Protests continued outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters in Brooklyn Center, Minn., for a fourth night over the killing of Daunte Wright. Many elected officials think that aggressive response resulted in the subsequent violence and destruction, lessons that some believe were ignored in Brooklyn Center. Last week, Brooklyn Center Mayor Mike Elliott and the city council called on law enforcement to dial back their response, including their use of chemical irritants. At a Thursday news conference, Walz told reporters he was “deeply concerned” by the use of tear gas on protesters in Brooklyn Center and how it had affected residents. The increased security response has drawn mixed reactions across the city, including in areas that are still recovering from last year’s destruction.
Minneapolis braces for unrest as Derek Chauvin trial enters final phase
© Octavio Jones/Reuters Demonstrators gather outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department on Saturday night in Minnesota during a protest over the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright. The two-story apartment complex has been Ground Zero for demonstrations over last week’s fatal shooting of 20-year-old Daunte Wright by a Brooklyn Center police officer. © Joshua Lott/The Washington Post National Guard members patrol the streets of Minneapolis as the city prepares for the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial. © Joshua Lott/The Washington Post A member of the National Guard patrols along Cedar Avenue. Keynan was initially disheartened last week when he saw National Guard troops in predominantly White commercial districts.
Line Of Duty: Historic crime plot echoes real events - as latest episode ends on biggest cliffhanger yet
*** WARNING: THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR THE LATEST EPISODE OF LINE OF DUTY, SEASON SIX, EPISODE FIVE. AdvertisementBut as well as the dramatic end sequence, this latest episode was about digging into the murder of Vella (Andi Osho) - and discovering why some police officers may have benefited from it. "In fact, Lawrence Christopher was an architect, who had never been in trouble with the law," DC Bishop says. If any of these details sound familiar, it's perhaps because the fictional case of Lawrence Christopher bears some similarities to the deaths of Stephen Lawrence and Christopher Alder in the 1990s. Image: DC Chloe Bishop (Shalom Brune-Franklin) has uncovered details of the historic crime Gail Vella was investigating.
Cruz leads Republicans in accusing Maxine Waters of 'actively encouraging riots and violence'
Ted Cruz has accused Democrats of 'actively encouraging riots & violence' after California Representative Maxine Waters joined protesters in Minnesota on Saturday night, and urged the crowd to 'get more confrontational'. Maxine Waters, congresswoman for California, was in Minnesota on Saturday evening'Why is Maxine Waters traveling to a different state trying to incite a riot? Hours after Waters' stirring speech, a Minnesota National Guard and Minneapolis police team were fired upon in a drive-by shooting. One person also accused Waters of 'stirring people up again with her calls for violence.' Pictured: Congresswoman Maxine Waters leaving the protest at the Brooklyn Center Police Department on SaturdayMaxine Waters (D-CA) joins demonstrators in a protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station on Saturday nightMaxine Waters (D-CA) joins demonstrators in a protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station on Saturday nightWaters is planning on staying in town until Monday.
Oath Keepers: How a militia group mobilized in plain sight for the assault on the Capitol
The FBI has called it 'an act of domestic terrorism' and one group has grabbed investigators' attention for their role – the oath keepers. But unlike most other militia groups, we learned the oath keepers haven't been hiding. She's the leader of a self-described Ohio militia group and member of the Oath Keepers. When President Trump warned of an invasion of undocumented migrants, the Oath Keepers called on members to patrol the border. You're the biggest Oath Keepers group, why wouldn't you be talking to him.
A federal appeals court has let stand an Ohio law that prohibits doctors from performing abortions because the fetus has Down Syndrome - The Washington Post
No other justice joined Thomas’s opinion, but his arguments have flourished among conservative judges in the lower federal courts. Story continues below advertisementThe effort to link abortion with eugenics and deracination is part of a longer-range strategy to destabilize and eventually overrule Roe. Under the court’s practice, a precedent cannot be overruled simply because a majority of the current court disagrees. Margaret Sanger spearheaded the birth control movement and, in the 1920s and 1930s, cited eugenics theory to expand contraceptive access. The interest in racial justice has never been more urgent.
Jane Austen's tea drinking will face 'historical interrogation' over slavery links
Jane Austen's tea drinking will be subjected to "historical interrogation" over its slavery links, the director of a museum dedicated to the author has said. Staff at the museum are now re-evaluating Jane Austen’s place in “Regency-era colonialism” in the wake of Black Lives Matter protests. The museum's director has stated that Austen’s tea drinking, a key social ceremony in her era and her novels, also links the writer to the exploitation of the British Empire. Lizzie Dunford, director of Jane Austen's House Museum, told The Telegraph: “This is just the start of a steady and considered process of historical interrogation. Jane Austen’s family were no exception.
Historian Reviews Civil Rights Movements in TV & Film, from 'Selma' to 'Malcolm X' | Vanity Fair
In this scene, Martin Luther King, Jr.,and his wife, Coretta, talk about the emotional tollthe movement is having on their marriage and their lives. It is not only dealing with marital infidelity,but the real sense of danger that accompaniedthe work of civil rights activistslike the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King. So the fear and trepidation that Coretta Scott King hadabout her husband wasn't only relatedto threats of violence. The Black Panthers, the Young Lords,and the Young Patriots are forming a Rainbow Coalitionof oppressed brothers and sisters of every color. Malcolm was a fiery orator, and if he turnedhis fiery rhetoric on you, you were not gonna be spared.
Facebook tests “kind” speed dating and Steak-Umm beefs with Neil deGrasse Tyson
Video Ben & Jerry's has successfully blended ice cream and activism for decades—here's how At the intersection of activism and confectionary delight is none other than Ben & Jerry’s. The company has stood up for everything from climate change to same sex marriage to Black lives matter and defunding the police. And in June 2020, the brand took a bold stance against white supremacy, proving that in business, silence is no longer an option. Host Chris Denson spoke with Head of Global Activism Strategy Christopher Miller and Global Social Mission Officer Dave Rapaport about the realities of being a mission-driven brand and what they’re doing to change their internal culture to reflect the brand's own outward ideals.
Every brand should embrace these 5 lessons in customer loyalty from super group BTS
ENTICEadvertisementSelling Your Brand: Traditional marketers ask customers to make the first entre into the brand’s world. ENLIGHTEN Selling Your Brand: Traditional marketers educate by focusing on the products they are pitching. ENROLL Selling Your Brand: Traditional marketers seek to convert customers by making rational arguments, such as price-value appeals. ENGAGE Selling Your Brand: Traditional marketers tend to incentivize engagement with a catalog of rewards. advertisementEMPOWER Selling Your Brand: Traditional marketers do all they can to maintain brand control and protect their status as the primary influencer.
George Floyd killing: protests flare as Americans await verdict in Chauvin trial
Closing arguments are expected in the Derek Chauvin trial on Monday. “I hope that we’re going to get a verdict that says, guilty, guilty, guilty,” Waters said. A man faces the Minnesota state troopers standing guard outside the Brooklyn Center police station after a police officer shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minneapolis, Minnesota on 12 April. The protests in Brooklyn Center, a suburb of Minneapolis, was quieter on Saturday night. Minnesota governor Tim Walz had spoken out earlier on Saturday, calling the reports of police violence towards journalists at Brooklyn Center earlier in the week “unacceptable”.
'Highly unlikely' Chauvin trial ends in 'all-out' acquittal, legal analyst predicts
Closing arguments are expected in the Derek Chauvin trial on Monday. “I hope that we’re going to get a verdict that says, guilty, guilty, guilty,” Waters said. A man faces the Minnesota state troopers standing guard outside the Brooklyn Center police station after a police officer shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minneapolis, Minnesota on 12 April. The protests in Brooklyn Center, a suburb of Minneapolis, was quieter on Saturday night. Minnesota governor Tim Walz had spoken out earlier on Saturday, calling the reports of police violence towards journalists at Brooklyn Center earlier in the week “unacceptable”.
Commentary: Is Scott Rudin’s apology enough? A new era demands more
Producer Scott Rudin’s bullying wasn’t much of a secret on Broadway. AdvertisementIn short, Rudin isn’t going anywhere. Shaming abuse victims to speak out about their trauma is not only wrong but can traumatize the victim even further. Shaming abuse victims to speak out about their trauma is not only wrong but can traumatize the victim even further. They have the real estate.”Was Rudin’s behavior tolerated by the Shubert Organization because of the high-quality work he was producing?
George Floyd killing: protests flare as Americans await verdict in Chauvin trial
Protests against police killings flared across the US this weekend, from Minneapolis to Chicago to Portland, as Americans wait for a verdict in the trial of the white police officer charged with murdering George Floyd last year. Closing arguments are expected in the Derek Chauvin trial on Monday. “I hope that we’re going to get a verdict that says, guilty, guilty, guilty,” Waters said. The protests in Brooklyn Center, a suburb of Minneapolis, was quieter on Saturday night. Minnesota governor Tim Walz had spoken out earlier on Saturday, calling the reports of police violence towards journalists at Brooklyn Center earlier in the week “unacceptable”.
The Georgia Voting Law and the End of the New South
On March 8th, he was presiding over the state Senate when a Republican bill restricting voting access came to the floor. By the end of last year, nearly three-quarters of Georgia Republicans told pollsters that they thought the election had been stolen. “The way I’d characterize it is you have the growth South and the stagnant South, and the growth South is where the Democrats are making headway,” Bullock said. But the politics of the Georgia bill seemed clear. When Delta denounced the voting bill as “unacceptable,” Georgia’s House of Representatives did not cower.
The Shooting of Daunte Wright and the Meaning of George Floyd’s Death
But for Floyd’s death, New York City would likely not have unsealed the disciplinary records of more than eighty thousand police officers earlier this year. Demonstrators in Brooklyn Center climb on top of two police vehicles serving as a roadblock on Sunday. Photograph by Joanie ShaferOn Sunday, a twenty-year-old named Daunte Wright was stopped near the intersection of Sixty-third and Lee Avenues in Brooklyn Center, an inner-ring suburb of Minneapolis. About four hundred people, most but far from all of them Black, gathered to protest Wright’s death in front of the Humboldt Avenue police station, in Brooklyn Center. Minnesota state troopers wearing riot gear monitor a demonstration outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters on Monday.
Biden Finally Got to Say No to the Generals
As soon as Biden’s decision was announced, both Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and the Republican senator Lindsey Graham, and also a few Democrats, criticized the move. Of the 2,488 U.S. fatalities in Afghanistan, which Biden cited during his speech, some two thousand occurred a decade or more ago. In truth, the Afghan war will go on, just without the United States participating in it. For several hours before Biden’s speech, his newly appointed intelligence leaders testified before Congress about that global-threats assessment. More Americans were dying every day during the pandemic’s height than in the entire two decades of the U.S. involvement in the Afghan war.
Jimmie Johnson on NASCAR retirement, auto racing future
As the 45-year-old completes his 20th and final NASCAR season, he explains why he’s done with stock cars and what his next chapter will be. Richard Petty, Dale Earnhardt and Jimmie Johnson: One of these things is not like the others. All three own seven NASCAR season championships, but only one did not grow up in North Carolina as a second-generation stock car racer. Now, as Johnson completes his 20th and final season, he is one of 12 interlopers with a title. Next year Johnson will drive a road-course-only schedule for Chip Ganassi Racing in the IndyCar series.
Trevor Lawrence on the NFL, marriage and a desire to prove absolutely nothing
The sun is setting in Laguna Beach, Calif., and Trevor Lawrence wants to enjoy it. Trevor Lawrence is out to prove absolutely nothing. • Get the May 2021 issue featuring our Trevor Lawrence cover story here. That was the strangest part about coaching the nation’s top high school quarterback: If Trevor Lawrence had goals, he didn’t talk about them. More SI Daily Covers:• The Trevor Lawrence Effect and the Jacksonville Effect• The Year of the Opt-Out Prospect• What Happened to 'Sports Jeopardy!
Meet the craft trailblazers transforming Hollywood (and the Oscars) behind the scenes
An unprecedented number of women and people of color are up for Oscars this year. — there are more trailblazers to celebrate in the craft categories. "Being in quarantine brought a lot of awareness to so many things are far as Black Lives Matter [and] #MeToo. "As we move forward and there are more women in sound, then [hopefully] it'll just be a norm." "The phone was ringing like crazy and I [thought] no, no, no, I'm not ready for this," says Couttolenc on how she reacted to her nomination in the Best Sound category.
Everything Harlem Run Co-Founder Amir Muhammad Figueroa Wears While Running
“They’re one of my favorite pairs of sneakers to run or even just hang out in,” he says, “because they’re so versatile” and can easily be worn on roads or trails. The shoes were created for Under Armour by Yurri Mial, a young Black designer with whom Figueroa is friends, so he got an inside look on the process that went into the design. Until recently, Under Armour sponsored Harlem Run, so Figueroa owns plenty of gear from the brand, like these pants he wore on this run (he likes how they’re tapered at the ankles and roomier through the thighs). He also wore Harlem Run’s fall marathon Under Armour shirt. “That’s one of my favorite pieces,” says Figueroa, who says the design (selected in a contest among the club’s members) captures the club’s spirit of social activism.
A Hot New Restaurant Moved In. That Made Its Neighbors Nervous.
Luisa’s family has lived in the same apartment building on Onderdonk Avenue in Ridgewood since she was 10 years old. She spent the summer listening to the drilling and construction along Onderdonk Avenue, including for Rolo’s, a new restaurant from a trio of former Manhattan chefs. Photo: Christian RodriguezIndeed, some neighbors don’t see any drawback to the arrival of Rolo’s or the building’s renovation?. Photo: Christian Rodriguez“I get that our apartments are on the higher end of the market on Ridgewood,” Westergaard says. “We’re the opposite of, ‘How are we going to make a quick buck off the neighborhood?’” Westergaard says.
What the Museum of 2020 May Look Like
These choices will become the Museum of 2020. From top: Photo: Nicholas DeSantis, Center for Brooklyn History, Brooklyn Public Library Photo: Jeff Schneider, Center for Brooklyn History, Brooklyn Public LibraryThe Center for Brooklyn History (formerly the Brooklyn Historical Society until its merger with the Brooklyn Public Library in October 2020) began collecting for its COVID-19 project last April. Smithsonian Museum of American HistoryOne of the first COVID-19 vaccine vials is now part of the Smithsonian Museum of American History’s collection. Photo: Courtesy of The American History MuseumIn March, the Smithsonian Museum of American History announced that it had acquired a coronavirus-vaccine vial and its associated packaging from Northwell Health’s first doses administered in the United States. The museum is still reviewing them, and as of now, nothing from 2020 has been accessioned into its permanent collection.
The Problem With Lena Dunham’s Plus-Size Collection
Think of all the fat celebrities — predominantly Black women and women of color — who have paved a path in plus-size fashion, allowing so many of us fat folks to explore our personal style. It’s a reminder that plus-size fashion is still an exclusive club intent on keeping authority and power rotating in the same circles, desperate to do anything but give fat Black women their flowers. But in trying to express her thoughts about venturing into plus-size fashion, she has made comments that are alienating to the very communities she’s attempting to represent. The work is paying fat Black women for creating impact in this industry while we’re alive. So should the majority of designers and brands, who simply refuse to cater to the huge market that is the plus-size community.
Simon & Schuster Won’t Distribute Cop’s Breonna Taylor Book
Children play near a mural of Breonna Taylor on September 17, 2020, in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesAfter a social-media outcry, Simon & Schuster announced on April 15 that it will no longer distribute a book by Jonathan Mattingly, a cop involved in the killing of Breonna Taylor. “Like much of the American public, earlier today Simon & Schuster learned of plans by distribution client Post Hill Press to publish a book by Jonathan Mattingly,” a company statement said. This is not the first time Simon & Schuster has decided to pull a book. In 2017, the Big Five publisher called off former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulous’s Dangerous after “standing by him through weeks of criticism.” This year, Simon & Schuster canceled plans to release Senator Josh Hawley’s The Tyranny of Big Tech after he was accused of inciting the Capitol insurrection.
Matt Gaetz Is All Alone
Matt Gaetz’s political action committee is launching a six-figure ad buy to defend the lawmakers against a string of sex-related allegations. As evidence mounts of his illicit activities and connections, Gaetz is naturally claiming it’s all part of a liberal plot to destroy him. The commercial, which will run in his panhandle district and also nationally, will represent some of the only on-air support for Gaetz as he tries to salvage his reputation. Gaetz did make an effort to ingratiate himself in the Fox News ecosystem, but the network too is keeping its distance. Unlike Roger Stone or Michael Cohen or Jason Miller, Gaetz just happens to be a sitting member of Congress.
Did a Black undercover NYPD detective unwittingly aid Malcolm X’s assassination?
Perhaps the most well-known among them, Black undercover BOSSI officer Gene Roberts, home from the Navy, infiltrated Malcolm X’s security team. In the letter Reggie Wood unveiled 56 years later, Ray Wood allegedly pushed a third scenario. ‘A lowering of the guard’According to Reggie’s account: Ray Wood was awakened on Feb. 21, 1965, by a phone call. Ray Wood died believing that he had played an unwitting role in exposing Malcolm, Reggie said. Adams also questioned the allegations that her father was at the ballroom when Malcolm X was murdered.
DeSantis Hints at Political Consequences for Companies That ‘Genuflect’ to ‘Wokeness’
The GuardianActivists welcome support in the battle against Republican voter suppression but wonder what such words are worth Joe Biden listens as Kenneth Frazier, chairman and chief executive Merck, speaks in Washington. Hundreds of companies and business leaders lent their names this week to a two-page ad declaring “we must ensure the right to vote for all of us”, published in the country’s biggest papers. “These corporations are pandering to a big lie that is being used to justify voter suppression. Corporations increasingly feel pressure from consumers and in some cases employees on social and political issues, Serazio said. “They have to choose whether to side with an increasingly authoritarian [Republican party], or the majority of their workers and their consumers.
BLM protester exaggerated claims he was 'dying' while demonstrating near home of Army drill sergeant
The maskless Black Lives Matter protester and Air Force veteran who was filmed claiming that he was 'sick' and 'dying' of COVID-19 while protesting outside the home of disgraced Army Drill Sergeant Jonathan Pentland says he was exaggerating. Harley is seen standing at the end of Pentland's driveway, dressed in a Black Lives Matter t-shirt and a black face mask, as he begins his speech slamming the Army Drill Sergeant. A crowd of around 150 Black Lives Matter protestors rallied outside Pentland's home Wednesday night, holding signs and chanting. The soldier asks where Deandre lives and claims he is 'harassing the neighborhood'. Pentland has been suspended from his drill instructor role pending the outcome of the Department of Justice assault charge.
BLM protester outside home of soldier Jonathan Pentland says he’s ‘dying’ of COVID
A Black Lives Matter protester surrounded by others rallying outside the South Carolina home of suspended soldier Jonathan Pentland made a sickening confession — that he was “dying” of COVID-19. He then beat his chest as he shouted about how he “came from my home” to be at the rally Wednesday. “I wasn’t supposed to be out there because I was recovering from COVID-19, but I had to let Johnathan Eugene Pentland KNOW!! “You trespassed on Pentland’s property and knowingly exposed ppl to a deadly virus (you said you were dying),” one commentator told him. Pentland, meanwhile, has been charged with third-degree assault and battery Wednesday and has also been suspended from his duties.
Report: NBA Tells Teams Games Could Be Postponed After Derek Chauvin Verdict
Ashley Landis/Associated PressThe NBA has reportedly told teams to prepare for game postponements in wake of a potential verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder case this week. ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported the potential of civil unrest following a verdict could lead to a pause in the season for "a night or two." Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, is facing second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter charges after kneeling on the neck of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, last May during an arrest attempt. The NBA and WNBA also postponed playoff games in August amid player protests after police shot Jacob Blake several times in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Minneapolis and other cities around the United States have increased their security in preparation for the verdict in Chauvin's trial.
“The cops don’t know when they’re not supposed to shoot”: Bikers Take the Streets for Daunte Wright
About 150 bikers gathered yesterday evening at Barclays Center for a “Justice for Daunte Wright” protest organized by Riders for Black Lives. Wright was killed about 10 miles from where George Floyd died at the hands of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. “We’re here because, once again, the cops don’t know when they’re not supposed to shoot,” said one of the organizers as she welcomed the crowd. Halfway across the Brooklyn Bridge, the riders stopped and held a moment of silence for Wright. Adams exited the ride before it crossed over the Brooklyn Bridge.
India’s Hindu Nationalist Project Relies on Brutal Repression
It later became an annual tradition for Ambedkarites to congregate in Bhima Koregaon on January 1 to keep the memory of the battle alive. On December 29 — before the Elgar Parishad event and the Bhima Koregaon celebrations — a group of Hindu nationalists desecrated a shrine near Bhima Koregaon that was held sacred by Dalits. Several of those arrested in the Bhima Koregaon case had previously been targeted by Congress governments. Like in Bhima Koregaon, cases are filed and proliferate in what one analysis called “blank checks, to be encashed by the police” at any time. In any case, it is clear that the government is trying to apply the “Bhima Koregaon” model.
In Derek Chauvin’s Trial, Will We Finally Get Justice?
Subscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! For more from The Nation, check out our latest issueSubscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! Ten months after George Floyd died with Derek Chauvin’s knee on his neck, jurors in Chauvin’s murder trial were told that the former Minnesota police officer knelt on Floyd’s body for nine minutes and 29 seconds—43 seconds longer than previously reported. To put witnesses, first responders, and Floyd himself, rather than Chauvin, on trial. “This is the exact same playbook they used in my brother’s trial,” Tiffany Crutcher recently told CNN about the Chauvin defense.
For Black Lives Matter Protesters, There Are No Days Off
Subscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! For more from The Nation, check out our latest issueSubscribe to The Nation Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! Protesters initially gathered in the neighborhood where he was killed before blocking off the intersection outside the Brooklyn Center police station two miles away. Another wears a shirt for Kobe Heisler, a 21-year-old who was killed by Brooklyn Center police in 2019. “We have a duty to win!”In Brooklyn Center on Sunday, Garraway is wearing a black T-shirt with Teigen’s photo on it.
Just Outside Minneapolis, the Next Uprising Is Here
In a residential portion of Brooklyn Center, a suburb just north of Minneapolis, a tall Black Power fist stands over a stop sign, under a utility pole. As they pull back from the hug, she says, “We have to do better.”On Wednesday night, the curfew in Brooklyn Center starts at 10. On Monday, the Brooklyn Center City Council banned the use of tear gas, according to the Sahan Journal, but it continues to fill the air. The Hennepin County jail in downtown Minneapolis sits just outside the heavily guarded Government Center where Chauvin is on trial. Another 15 minutes north of Brooklyn Center, a police car sits in the driveway of Potter’s large, suburban home.
How BLM Is Subtly Shaping the Chauvin Trial
The phrase “Black Lives Matter” hasn’t cropped up frequently during the actual trial of police officer Derek Chauvin, who is facing manslaughter, second-degree murder, and third-degree murder charges over the death of George Floyd. During jury selection for the Chauvin trial itself, all potential jurors were asked about their view of Black Lives Matter and the responses were strongly positive. But Arradondo didn’t take those tacks—instead, the movement for Black Lives provided an alternative compelling narrative that the chief was able to access. By invoking respect and dignity repeatedly, the very qualities that Black Lives Matter supporters say is fatally lacking in police dealings with Black Americans, his testimony revealed how the ethos of the movement has subtly pervaded the trial. The jury saw an officer approach Floyd’s car with pistol drawn, pointing it at Floyd’s head in the driver’s seat.
Charles Booker Knows Just How to Tackle Rand Paul in 2022
On the surface, incumbent Republican Rand Paul looks to be in solid shape in the Bluegrass State. Senate Democratic leaders and the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee had followed the predictable pattern and recruited a centrist with a military résumé, Amy McGrath, to take on Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. McGrath had lost a US House race two years earlier, and her 2020 Senate bid was characterized by stumbles that suggested she was headed for another defeat. Even before the November 2020 election, Kentucky Democrats were speculating about what Booker might have been able to accomplish in a race against a Republican incumbent. Booker announced this week that he has formed an exploratory committee to prepare a run against Paul.
Caring About Black Lives Can Get You Busted
For many years, at the entrance to the downtown area in Pensacola, Florida, stood a towering Confederate statue. In 2019, police shot and killed an unarmed Black man named Tymar Crawford in front of his children. In some cases, it could result in felony convictions, under Florida law would result in the loss of voting rights. Gina Castro Protesters against HB 1 in Pensacola, Florida, on April 10. “This is really evident and it’s the opposite of the bipartisan effort to reverse mass incarceration in this state.”Activists in Pensacola agree that this bill, if passed, will not kill the Black Lives Matter movement.
Trevor Noah Asks "Where Are the Good Apples?" While Dissecting Policing in America
Next time someone uses the "it's just a few bad apples" argument while discussing America's policing system, simply send them the above Trevor Noah clip as a retort. Both left Noah with one big question: "Where are the good apples?" "We're not dealing with bad apples. Circling back to the "bad apples" analogy, Noah concluded his segment with yet another astute observation: "We're not dealing with bad apples. We're dealing with a rotten tree that happens to grow good apples."
The sympathy and authority of the witnesses in the Chauvin trial
The first week of the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd, has been an emotional one. “When I look at George Floyd, I look at my dad. And I’m not just talking about witnesses who are there, but the witnesses in the courtroom who are jurors. The prosecutors are connecting the jurors with George Floyd and, by extension, connecting him with the witnesses. I don’t think there’s been a gradual understanding and awakening to policing in America.
“10 years for protest, 5 years for rape”: Demonstrators protest a policing bill in England and Wales
Thousands of demonstrators marched across Britain on Saturday in protest of a massive new policing bill that would create new restrictions on protest in England and Wales and impose hefty fines for not following police instructions. The bill, officially known as the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, was introduced in early March and has been met with widespread pushback in England and Wales since then. Ahead of @JeremyCorbyn addressing tomorrow's London #KillTheBill protest, watch this video, spread the word, and help build the movement to defend our democratic rights. And together, we’ll beat Boris Johnson’s dangerous proposal to ban protest.”This weekend’s “kill the bill” marches aren’t the first. Bristol, England: Protesters pulled down a statue of Edward Colston, a 17th Century slave trader, and dumped it in the harbor.
Police officers are prosecuted for murder in less than 2 percent of fatal shootings
“In my opinion, it’s got to be that more of the fatal shootings are unjustified.”Of those 139 officers, just 44 were convicted (with 42 cases still pending). Many of those convictions came on lesser charges: Just seven officers have been convicted of murder in police shootings since 2005, with their prison sentences ranging from 81 months to life. Still, even the cases that result in charges are a tiny fraction of fatal police shootings. Following the 2017 Minneapolis police killing of Justine Damond, Hennepin County prosecutor Mike Freeman brought murder charges against the shooting officer, Mohamed Noor. The result: Police officers today get away without even an arrest for murder or manslaughter in more than 98 percent of fatal shootings.
The effects of Black Lives Matter protests
There’s long been a fierce debate about the effect of Black Lives Matter protests on the lethal use of force by police. For every 4,000 people who participated in a Black Lives Matter protest between 2014 and 2019, police killed one less person. From 2014 to 2019, Campbell tracked more than 1,600 BLM protests across the country, largely in bigger cities, with nearly 350,000 protesters. Campbell’s research also indicates that these protests correlate with a 10 percent increase in murders in the areas that saw BLM protests. It’s possible that, in response to BLM protests, police departments implemented reforms that reduced lethal use of force.
Can Mark Wahlberg have it all?
“You know why this show is gonna be such a hit?” Mark Wahlberg says, a slightly manic grin on his face, walking away from the camera after a meeting. I don’t know if Wahl Street will be a hit, and no, fabulously wealthy movie star Wahlberg hasn’t imploded, but to quote Mark himself: Wahl Street is a fucking shitshow. I don’t really want to either give a pass to or rag in a personal manner on Mark Wahlberg, father of four, who comes off as very earnest guy. But I can’t peek into the heart of Mark Wahlberg, the man. I can only look at his public life and the portrait of Mark Wahlberg that Wahl Street paints — a guy who seems to be doing more acting on this reality show than he does when he’s playing someone else in a movie.
“I Felt Hate More Than Anything”: How an Active Duty Airman Tried to Start a Civil War
“I Felt Hate More Than Anything”: How an Active Duty Airman Tried to Start a Civil War Steven Carrillo’s path to the Boogaloo Bois shows the hate group is far more organized and dangerous than previously known. Experts in extremist militia groups have long regarded the Boogaloo Bois as having no real hierarchy or leadership structure. (The Air Force said it could not immediately locate the records it needed to comment about this incident.) When asked in an interview about his involvement with the Grizzly Scouts, Carrillo responded evasively. Instead, he forthrightly proclaimed his support for the Boogaloo Bois and repeatedly challenged what he views as misconceptions about the group.
My Little Pony Fans Are Ready to Admit They Have a Nazi Problem
My Little Pony fans primarily express their enthusiasm for the show by sharing their own cartoon drawings of the main characters, which they usually upload to the image boards. Derpibooru hosts millions of My Little Pony artworks, plenty of which are simple tributes to magic, friendship, and magical friendship. For years, this has been the status quo in the world of My Little Pony. Even a quick glance at the history of My Little Pony fandom serves as a valuable template for how not to build an online community. In 2012, a message board called /mlp/ was set up because My Little Pony conversation was taking up too much space on boards for TV and comics.
A Distinctly American Problem Needs Systematic Investigation
Local authorities review a killing to determine whether laws and department policies were followed. The most egregious police killings renew protests that succeed in generating attention, statements of concern from corporations, and gestures of solidarity from progressives, but not in reducing police killings. A faction within the Black Lives Matter movement is proposing potentially valuable policy changes at the local level. The NTSB’s painstaking collection and evaluation of evidence after each accident can take months or even years, but the investigations yield insights that save lives. Today, the worldwide total is usually about one-tenth that level.”What if every police killing triggered that sort of response?
8 Photo Stories That Will Challenge Your View Of The World
It was another week of fatal and devastating gun violence in America. With people reeling from repeated mass shootings and police killing people in the streets, we took a look at Black Lives Matter protests resuming around the country after the death of Daunte Wright and Thursday's public release of videos of the March 29 police killing of 13-year-old Adam Toledo. The footage showed that the seventh-grader had his hands up when an officer fatally shot him. And last but not least, Ivor Prickett spoke with LensCulture about photographing Iraq and Syria and the end of ISIS’s so-called caliphate. For more photo stories like these from around the internet, sign up for our newsletter.
The Controversy Around The The UK Race & Ethnic Disparities Report, Explained
On March 31, 2021, the UK government revealed the outcome of the highly anticipated Race and Ethnic disparities report, a review commissioned in the wake of the Black Lives Matter anti-racism demonstrations that took place during the summer of 2020. The 258-page report was commissioned by Downing Street following the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020. While the report acknowledged “overt racism” remains, particularly online, the report found no conclusive evidence of institutional racism in the country. The lengthy report looked at race and ethnic disparities in education, employment, crime, and policing, and health. Some of the key takeaways include:The report claims children from ethnic communities “did as well or better than white pupils” in compulsory education.
George Floyd's death did not spark a racial reckoning
I even put the phrase in one of my own headlines without ever asking myself what a racial reckoning meant. So why do we keep saying that the country has experienced a racial reckoning? Bryant wrote a 600-word story declaring that the US is "now in the midst of another racial reckoning." Can we honestly say that life is dramatically different for people of color one year after Floyd's death? A real racial reckoning needs this ingredientWhat then, does a real racial reckoning look like?
How Black Lives Matter put slave reparations back on the agenda
“No one should be forced to pay compensation for what they have not done,” said Republican Congressman Steve Chabot of Ohio. The Afro-Caribbean groups behind the demands rejected the court rulings on the grounds that France had compensated slave owners when it abolished slavery in 1848. The British Empire also compensated slave owners when it abolished slavery in 1833. Some historians note that a significant number of these former slave owners were “free people of colour” – former slaves who themselves became owners of slaves. Private initiativesWhile no country involved in the transatlantic slave trade has established reparations for the descendants of slaves, other initiatives have been set up.
'The OK Legislature Wants Us Dead': Rights Defenders Decry Advancement of Anti-Protest Bills
—State Sen. George YoungTulsa Public Radio reports the state Senate passed H.B. 1674 ahead of the vote, state Sen. Another Black lawmaker, state Sen. George Young (D-48), said that "the foundation of this bill is to keep institutional racism alive. — ACLU of Oklahoma (@ACLUOK) April 14, 2021Critics of the bills including civil rights campaigners warned that the measures further endanger Black lives. 1674 is one of many anti-protest measures that have been recently passed or proposed in more than a dozen states.
'Racist, Unconstitutional, and Anti-Democratic': Florida Senate Passes GOP Anti-Protest Bill
After Florida's Senate Republicans on Thursday passed an undemocratic anti-protest bill—expected to be signed into law by its chief proponent, Republican Gov. —March For Our Lives FloridaHouse Bill 1 "is racist, unconstitutional, and anti-democratic, plain and simple," Micah Kubic, executive director of the ACLU of Florida, said in a statement. "It is no coincidence," Kubic continued, that HB1 and its companion bill, Senate Bill 484, "were introduced by politicians who harshly criticized" millions of Floridians and Americans for demanding "racial justice and police accountability." HB 1, the anti-peaceful protest bill, was passed by the Florida Senate in a vote of 23-17. "March For Our Lives Florida, our members, chapters, and supporters condemn the passing of HB1 and the failure of our lawmakers in Tallahassee to listen to the needs of their constituents."
As Chauvin Trial Wraps Up, Police Killings Provoke Protests Across US
Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. "It is very hard to see how this man could be acquitted," @chrislhayes says on the Derek Chauvin trial. "But there is a history of police violence against unarmed Black people recorded on camera that has not led to convictions. The video circulated on social media, sparking national protests and demands for not only justice but also reforms. In my 25 years as a reporter I have NEVER heard police in America actually say “journalists will be arrested” during a protests.
US-Funded Uyghur Activists Train as Soldiers of Empire
Kuzzat Altay’s political activities are a reflection of the deeply rooted right-wing culture that pervades the Uyghur separatist movement. Far from a lone wolf, Faruk Altay has been joined by leading figures of the Uyghur separatist movement. Social media posts show UAA President Kuzzat Altay, Murat Ataman, and Bahram Sintash, among others attending Altay Defense training sessions. The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) has been central to the rising international prominence of the Uyghur separatist movement. The U.S. government has engaged in a marriage of convenience with a Uyghur separatist movement that is firmly aligned the gun-obsessed, anti-immigrant subculture of Trumpism.
Excited Delirium: How Cops Invented a Disease ? Current Affairs
Focused on proving why excited delirium is not “real,” they missed a broader point: why are diseases like excited delirium manufactured in the first place, and how are cultural beliefs and stereotypes reflected in the process of categorizing, diagnosing, and treating illness? In fact, if excited delirium is, as advocates maintain, a sterile, biochemical process—which remains doubtful—then the phenomenon is still a tragedy. Even if we accept the (very) debatable idea that excited delirium is real, it requires compassion and a dedication to better outcomes. How Excited Delirium Became ‘Real’Most histories of excited delirium begin with Luther Bell, a psychiatrist working at the McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. ), I wonder whether future generations will look at contemporary defenses of excited delirium in the same light (someone was killed by the cops and they called that “excited delirium”?).
We Need a New Kind of Socialist Organization ? Current Affairs
The old question of socialist organization is back: discussions about how to reform DSA are a constant part of DSA. If the relationships are what give DSA real staying power, they are also what often drive people out. When my chapter felt like a real political home, it was because the relationships were rooted in a shared vision. And as a result, this network of separate, local institutions has consistently failed to build the socialist movement we need. No socialist organization has been able to replicate its success at reaching people in the conditions we face today.
Protests spread over police shootings. Police promised reforms. Every year, they still shoot and kill nearly 1,000 people.
The ones prompting the loudest outcries often involve people who are black, unarmed, or both, shootings that have led to the harshest scrutiny of police. Since The Post began tracking the shootings, black people have been shot and killed by police at disproportionate rates — both in terms of overall shootings and the shootings of unarmed Americans. AdvertisementIn 2015, the first year The Post tallied these numbers, officers killed 94 unarmed people, the largest group among them black men: 38. For example, shootings of unarmed black people in 2019 increased from nine to 14. It happened in November 2014 in Cleveland, where a police officer shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice.
#blacklivesmatter United States is absolutely in need of real change in law enforcement practice
Sometimes people would think to question the numbers of other countries, but those of the United States are also quite troubling. The database can be viewed by state, gender, race/ethnicity, age, classification (e.g., "gunshot"), and whether the person killed was armed. [4]The Washington Post has tracked shootings since 2015, reporting more than 5,000 incidents since their tracking began. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. [21That every killing by the state was supposed to be a big deal- heard in trial- was the law of this land before it was the United States.
After failing on voter fraud BS, Ron Johnson just went full-on white supremacist on national TV
In this case, I’m talking about Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson, who every week finds a new despicable low in his race to the bottom. Is it really they want to remake the demographics of America, to ensure their -- that they stay in power forever? I’m working with Tom Nelson, a Democratic candidate for Senate against Johnson. He’s also not afraid to get tough — we have been mocking Johnson with billboards near his house, which he openly hates. Clearly, it’s working, because Tom is leading Ron Johnson in a new poll.
Roberta Flack's musical gift to us has spanned more than 5 decades
Roberta Flack was born into a musical family; her mother was a church organist and her father was a jazz musician. '”Roberta Flack has always held two souls within her body. “I didn’t try to be a soul singer, a jazz singer, a blues singer – no category,” Flack wrote. Roberta Flack suffered a stroke in 2016 that has kept her from performing in public, but the 83-year-old singer-songwriter and pianist remains active and creative. Meet me in the comments for even more music from Roberta Flack (and Rubina Flake).
Biden to Ukraine: “Unwavering Support for Euro-Atlantic Aspirations”
“Euro-Atlantic aspirations” means membership in NATO and the EU (that’s the usual sequence), the expansion of the Russia-NATO border by 1400 miles, and NATO’s virtual encirclement of Russia. In the U.S. State Department Victoria Nuland (back under Biden in a position of power) headed the project to achieve regime change in Ukraine, where the democratically-elected president opposed NATO membership. When the USSR dissolved newly independent Ukraine and Russia signed a long-term agreement for Russian military administration of the peninsula. There were Big Lies behind the Obama destruction of Libya, the Bush-Cheney war on Iraq, Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam War, the Spanish-American War. Biden’s “unwavering support for Ukraine” is in fact unwavering support for U.S. imperialism and its key global alliance, the most terrifying military alliance in world history.
“Wipe out China!” US-funded Uyghur activists train as gun-toting foot soldiers for empire
Kuzzat Altay’s political activities are a reflection of the deeply rooted right-wing culture that pervades the Uyghur separatist movement. Far from a lone wolf, Faruk Altay has been joined by leading figures of the Uyghur separatist movement. Social media posts show UAA President Kuzzat Altay, Murat Ataman, and Bahram Sintash, among others attending Altay Defense training sessions. The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) has been central to the rising international prominence of the Uyghur separatist movement. The US government has engaged in a marriage of convenience with a Uyghur separatist movement that is firmly aligned the gun-obsessed, anti-immigrant subculture of Trumpism.
'Palestinian Lives Matter,' shout Israeli protesters over killing of Iyad Hallak
Israeli border police shot and killed Iyad Hallak, 32, of East Jerusalem, at the Old City’s Lions’ Gate on May 30. An initial investigation has found that the officers suspected he had a pistol, so they chased and fired on him. When it comes to relations between Israelis and Palestinians, it is a powder keg that has known its share of terrorist attacks. Hallak was shot while cornered in a back room at the Lions’ Gate used to collect garbage. The demonstrators held signs reading “Palestinian Lives Matter,” a clear reference to the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States.
At the End of the COVID-19 Lockdown
Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. So when I came across The Nation's justice correspondent Elie Mystal's article, "I'm Not Ready To Reenter White Society," I read it with a great deal of interest. Mystal writes that he could "more or less only deal with whiteness" when he wanted to do so. "White people," Mystal continues, "haven't improved; I've just been able to limit my exposure to them." It's just that he's been able to choose being in white society.
Chicago Police Officer Shot 13-Year-Old Adam Toledo With His Hands in the Air
“A Chicago police officer murdered Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old. Protesters took to the streets of Chicago Thursday night to condemn the police killing of Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old Latinx boy. The Toledo family’s attorney, Adeena Weiss-Ortiz, described the killing as an “assassination.”ADEENA WEISS–ORTIZ: By now, all of you have seen the videos of Adam Toledo. AMY GOODMAN: The police officer who shot Adam Toledo has been placed on administrative duty. What I understand took place is that a Chicago police officer murdered Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old.
The RWDSU’s debacle at Amazon
Banner on Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama (Credit: WSWS Media)Appelbaum’s explanation is absurd on its face. The campaign to install the RWDSU at Amazon did not arise from a movement of workers from below. In fact, press interviews with Amazon workers, expressing opposition towards the attempt to present their plight in purely racial terms, suggest that it may have even backfired spectacularly. The vote at Bessemer is not only a debacle for the RWDSU and the AFL-CIO, it is a debacle for the Democratic Party and all the middle-class organizations that surround it. Among Amazon workers, there is mass hostility to conditions of extreme exploitation.
The murder of Daunte Wright and the class issues in the fight against police violence
The protests that have erupted over Wright’s murder must be developed as a class movement. The militarized police forces that harass and kill individuals will be turned against the entire working class. The police and the National Guard always side with the bosses, operating as strike breakers by protecting scabs while beating and killing workers. The protests over Wright’s murder express genuine outrage over police violence and the daily brutalization of the population. The police are an institution that operate to protect the interests of the capitalist class and defend the state from the working class.
Rapper Little Simz: ‘I don’t hold back – I feel super free’
It’s a drab afternoon on an industrial estate in London and I’m sitting, somewhat awkwardly, in the back of a parked car with Little Simz. But there are two Simz: the one that is by nature reticent and the Simz who wants to show you her universe. “I can move in a way out there that sometimes I don’t feel too comfortable to do in London. Photograph: Ian West/PAThere are other things Simz won’t give away. When it comes to business and my work, I’m not shy at all, I don’t hold back with that.
Charitable Foundations Captured by Left Fuel American Division
(alfexe/iStock/Getty Images)Many charitable foundations have been captured by the Left. The decline in rural philanthropy is not new, extending as far back as the mid 2000s. Rural Americans know they’re both overlooked and looked down on. I’ve been in dozens of meetings where prominent philanthropic leaders rail against the backwardness of rural Americans. Of course, foundations, corporations, and generous individuals are free to support whatever causes they wish — freedom demands it.
What Some in DSA Get Wrong About Socialist Alternative
In the spirit of debate, ITT has given Socialist Alternative the opportunity to issue the following response. Socialist Alternative (SA) thanks the group of Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) comrades for putting forward their views publicly, and In These Times for giving us a platform to reply. In our view, factions and caucuses, whether in Socialist Alternative or in DSA, are normal features of a democratic organization. The history of Trotskyism, Socialist Alternative, and the ISAWe are proud of our affiliation with Leon Trotsky. Socialist Alternative members have never seen ourselves as competitors of DSA.
Why President Biden is all-in in infrastructure
More than 75 million Americans, about 25 percent of the population (and 65 percent of individuals age 65 or older), are fully vaccinated. In the meantime, Biden has little chance of signing legislation to promote racial justice. These realities help explain the political imperative pushing Biden, a moderate Democrat, to go all-in on a big, bold infrastructure bill. Sen. Joe Manchin Joe ManchinGOP acknowledges struggle to bring down Biden On The Money: Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats | Justice Dept. sues Trump ally Roger Stone for unpaid taxes Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats MORE (D-W.Va.) and several other Senate Democrats oppose raising the tax on corporations to 28 percent.
US politician calls for police reform as protests continue over death of Daunte Wright
The 20-year-old was killed during what should have been a routine traffic stop, sparking anger and fresh protests against police brutality and racial injustice. Protesters have gathered every night since the killing of Mr Wright in a neighbourhood about 16 kilometres north of Minneapolis. I convened a meeting today with media and law enforcement to determine a better path forward to protect the journalists covering civil unrest. "I convened a meeting today with media and law enforcement to determine a better path forward to protect the journalists covering civil unrest." Since then, fresh examples of police killings - including Mr Wright's not far from the courtroom - have stoked more anger and protests.
Kneeling Kaepernick inspires work by Elaine Badgley Arnoux, artist known for capturing S.F. notables
San Francisco artist Elaine Badgley Arnoux has always been deeply curious about people. Turn the corner and there’s a portrait of Mayor London Breed in a blue suit, completed by Badgley Arnoux just before the COVID-19 pandemic. (She’s painted 12 San Francisco mayors, after inviting each one with a personal letter to sit in her studio. “I don’t think I’ve ever had anything move me to that degree,” Badgley Arnoux says of Floyd’s death. Badgley Arnoux launched her “People of San Francisco” project as a lark in the 1990s with the goal of doing 100 portraits in five years.
As protests continue over police killings, lawmakers try to add to the list of crimes protesters could face
TOP: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020. ABOVE: Police lead detained protesters to the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections on Sept. 23, 2020. TOP: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020. ABOVE: Police lead detained protesters to the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections on Sept. 23, 2020. LEFT: Louisville Metro police and protesters face off during a Breonna Taylor protest in downtown Louisville on May 28, 2020.
Robert Schlesinger Why Republicans want corporations to end all criticism of their war on voting rights
When the Supreme Court ruled that corporations, like any person, have a right to freedom of speech — specifically in the form of their political spending — Republicans celebrated. Specifically, corporations’ political donations to Republicans should continue apace, but the check-writers ought to keep their social and political views to themselves after they’ve invested in Republican policymakers. The market has been rather uncooperative with Republicans' culture war targets in recent years. But the market has been rather uncooperative with Republicans' culture war targets in recent years. It’s divesting itself of the ideology of the free market.
Mickey Guyton will be the first Black woman to host Academy of Country Music Awards
After making history as the first Black solo female artist to earn a Grammy nomination in a country music category, Mickey Guyton’s star is about to rise even further. On Sunday, Guyton will make history again as the first Black woman to host the Academy of Country Music Awards, alongside Keith Urban, airing 8 p.m. Eastern on CBS. “You know, Keith Urban is from Australia and he had an affinity for country music,” she said. He's using his platform to uplift me, and that means so much.”As of late, country music has witnessed a cultural shift in terms of representation. Her passion for country music began in Texas when she was a little girl listening to LeAnn Rimes, Whitney Houston, CeCe Winans and her all-time favorite, Dolly Parton.
Navalny's doctor: Putin critic 'could die at any moment'
The TelegraphThe SNP has published plans to force Scottish schoolchildren to "face the UK's colonial past" in Black Lives Matter-inspired history lessons. This would highlight “Scotland and the UK’s colonial history” and all schools would be urged to adopt it. "A good history programme would recognise the importance of understanding the contexts in which this horrific trade in human beings was then conducted. He added: “The important point is that teachers are very experienced in teaching contentious issues in a balanced way. “The recent Black Lives Matter movement has shone a powerful spotlight on continuing racial injustice and race-based violence, and the need for countries to face their colonial history.
Police killed their loved ones. Now they’re hopeful of a conviction of the officer charged in death of George Floyd
Just a week ago, a police officer shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop a little more than 10 miles from the courthouse where Chauvin is on trial. A protester outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department in Minnesota calls for justice for Daunte Wright and George Floyd. Mock headstones at the “Say Their Names’ cemetery pay tribute to Black people killed by police. It reminds her of the moment she learned the officer who shot her brother had been acquitted of manslaughter. And lining the perimeter of the garden are signs with the faces and names of Black people killed by police.
Theodore Decker: Mayor details "state of the city" as current state plays out in real time
Columbus Mayor Andrew J. Ginther began his 2021 State of the City speech at 6 p.m. Wednesday, a few hours after the release of body camera footage of the latest killing of a Black man by law enforcement officers, including city police. "Not only are we still standing, but we're moving forward," the mayor began after an upbeat, city-produced video detailing a year of successes. Any mayor knows to brush upon the bad news up front and spend the rest of the speech hammering home the good. A point-in-time count in January found 1,201 people in Columbus homeless shelters, and the Columbus Coalition for the Homeless reported that 243 unique individuals paid 2,200 visits this past winter to the warming centers that opened in Downtown Columbus. Beside St. John's United Church of Christ on East Mound Street, some homeless men settled in for the night.
Adam Toledo, Daunte Wright and George Floyd: Would more de-escalation training stop police from killing people?
Over the next three hours, a growing law enforcement group that included a crisis negotiation team and tactical operations experts encircled the suspect. Those deaths and others have sparked renewed calls for law enforcement training that focuses on serving all members of a community, especially people of color vulnerable because of systemic racism, and puts a premium on de-escalation tactics that minimize violence. Chief among a number of challenges: the nation’s myriad law enforcement departments each operate under their own guidelines, making the adoption of a unified standard of protocols difficult. Meanwhile, a handful of local lawmakers and law enforcement agencies have taken steps toward reform. “We want national standards for de-escalation training, but departments are left to their own devices.”Some policing veterans claim training itself is not enough.
'Fast and Furious' actor Lucas Black leaves cars for the links to caddie at PGA Tour Champions event
A lot of the youngsters have seen the Fast and Furious franchise." Black also played quarterback Mike Winchell in the movie version of "Friday Night Lights" in 2004. After an even-par first round in Friday's first round, Bowden shot a 4-under 68 to move up into the top 25. "I've got a lot more time to get back out there, and I'm learning a lot out here," Black said. Black played golf in high school in Alabama, and also was golfer Luke Chisholm in the movie "Seven Days in Utopia" in 2011.
High school students: Police don't belong in schools. Here's how we forced them out.
Black students make up less than 9% of the district, but between 2014 and 2017, 25% of all citations, diversions and arrests made by school police were of Black students. The four of us are high school student leaders in Students Deserve, a coalition of students, parents and teachers working to make Black lives matter in and beyond schools. For years, Black students and families have led campaigns to end “willful defiance” suspensions and truancy tickets that disproportionally impacted Black students. In 2016, we met with Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, and Melina Abdullah, co-founder of Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles, and developed a plan we called Black Lives Matter in Schools. Sarah Djato, Sierra Leone Anderson, Quiano Assoon and Kahlila Williams are four Los Angeles Unified School District high school students and are leaders in Students Deserve.
How Coinbase’s billionaire CEO weathered a clash over Black Lives Matter
Coinbase’s landmark stock listing has made billionaire CEO Brian Armstrong an instant icon of the cryptocurrency revolution — but his last major turn in the spotlight came from a dustup over the Black Lives Matter movement. The edict was intentionally out of step with other Silicon Valley giants that issued statements in support of Black Lives Matter and pledged to support racial justice as protests raged across the country last summer. Several employees staged a virtual walkout on June 4 after Armstrong said in a meeting that issuing a statement in support of Black Lives Matter would be divisive, according to Axios. He also reportedly backed the Black Lives Matter movement in a series of tweets — but they appear to have been deleted. A man holds a Black Lives Matter flag during the protest “Families Supporting Families Joins Mass Action 4 George Floyd Justice 4 All Nationwide Protest” in St.Paul, Minnesota, on March 6.
‘Marxist’ BLM co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors defends real estate holdings
“Marxist” Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors tearfully defended her $3.2 million real estate empire, insisting she didn’t use a penny of BLM donations on herself. “I have never taken a salary from the Black Lives Matters Global Networks Foundation,” she also said Thursday. Khan-Cullors has said that the nonprofit foundation took in $90 million in 2020. Khan-Cullors said she doesn’t take a salary from the Black Lives Matters Global Networks Foundation. The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation took in over $90 million in 2020.
Media group blasts Facebook for blocking The Post’s story on BLM co-founder
A news-media industry group blasted Facebook on Friday over its “completely arbitrary” decision to block users from sharing a Post report about a Black Lives Matter co-founder’s $3.2 million in real estate holdings. “There is no balance of power between ‘media’ and ‘Big Tech,'” News Media Alliance CEO David Chavern said in a prepared statement. “In particular, the rationale expressed by Facebook was completely arbitrary and could be applied to a wide array of reporting.”The Post’s story dug into the $3.2 million worth of homes purchased by Patrisse Khan-Cullors. Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for GlamourThe article revealed that a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, Patrisse Khan-Cullors, a self-described Marxist, has amassed has amassed a real-estate portfolio of four properties in California and Georgia since 2016. Facebook — which said the report violated its “privacy and personal information policy” — didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.
Cowardly CEOs’ woke political activism is a PR gimmick
Major League Baseball recently decided the law is so onerous that it needs to move the All-Star game out of Atlanta. Hundreds of CEOs then jumped at the chance to profess their outrage over the situation in Georgia and anywhere else that such Neanderthal thinking exists. Despite the fawning coverage of CEOs standing for democracy, the whole thing had a cheap PR-gimmick stench to it. He butted heads with former President Donald Trump over trade policy and some appointment to key economic posts. In the overt wokeism of his peers he is seeing similar signs of groupthink and short-term strategizing that will not end well.
D.C. theaters look to future after year of hardships
“I feel I have been on overdrive, and a lot of organizations have,” said Maria Goyanes, artistic director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre. Like a number of companies, Woolly is aiming for a return to live theater this fall. And GALA Hispanic Theatre starts live performances on Thursday of “Tia Julia y el Escribidor” (“Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter”). Going live, he said, also came down to a desire to give actors and designers employment in the city’s only company for Spanish-speaking audiences. At Olney, he plans to bring issues that concern artists and audiences of color to Artistic Director Jason Loewith and the staff on a regular basis.
Studio Theatre’s latest play is about the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown, but feels urgently of the moment
“I was interested in letting the power of our theater be one where we put those stories center stage. Through those characters, acts of unconscious bias, generational prejudice, misguided liberalism, microaggression and overt bigotry wash over “Until the Flood’s” audience. “I want to raise them to know that they can speak up if they feel like they’re not being represented. I want to raise them to know their culture, aside from the fact that it’s a skin color. “I know that sometimes as Black people, a lot of our work is revolving around our pain.
Amazon wins enough votes to beat union effort in Alabama
Amazon on Friday secured enough votes to defeat the unionization drive at one of its Alabama warehouses, delivering a blow to organized labor who hoped to unionize a U.S. Amazon facility for the first time. In order to defeat the union, Amazon needed to garner 1,608 votes, or a little more than 50% of the ballots cast. Amazon said in a statement that "the union will say that Amazon won this election because we intimidated employees, but that's not true." RWDSU organizers were stationed outside the Bessemer facility daily, hoping to catch Amazon employees on their way out of work. In a statement, Randy Korgan, director of Amazon for the Teamsters, commended the RWDSU's efforts to organize Amazon workers in Alabama.
The fatal obstacles for Chauvin's defense (opinion)
One of these legendary district attorneys was forever irritated by defense attorneys who always sat the defendant's mother, dressed in her Sunday best,in the front row of the courtroom. One legendary Brooklyn prosecutor, according to office lore, had an answer to the sympathy ploy. Derek Chauvin undoubtedly has a mother, too, but if she is still alive, she has not been seen at her son's murder trial. Family members and supportive off-duty cops often pack courtrooms when officers are on trial for alleged crimes involving arrests of suspects. With the rise of Black Lives Matters and the intense public attention devoted to police misconduct allegations, public opinion seems to be shifting against the police, particularly in the largest cities.
Opinion: Under fire on race, the AMA should drop its support for the war on drugs
(CNN) The American Medical Association (AMA) recently made the news for its stance on institutional racism, and not in a good way. Through most of the AMA's history, Black physicians were refused membership in the organization because they were denied prerequisite membership in many state medical societies. There have been a few bright spots in the AMA's long history of racism and misguided support for the drug war. He also taught medicine and law at six prestigious universities, including Howard -- a historically Black medical school whose graduates were banned from the AMA of Jim Crow America. Some Southern states, in contrast, didn't stop discriminating against Black physicians until at least the 1950s.
In secret Facebook groups, America's best warriors share racist jabs, lies about 2020, even QAnon theories
U.S. Special Operations Command has about 70,000 personnel, and there are tens of thousands more retired members of special operations forces. The secret Facebook groups for special operations forces can be found only by members. US Special Forces Team Room, which has 4,700 members, is described as "for US Special Forces qualified individuals only." Austin's efforts to address extremism have made him the target of vitriolic commentary in the special operations forces Facebook groups. The private special operations forces groups feature multiple references to QAnon.
Leniency for defendants in Portland clashes could affect Capitol riot cases
Five of the Portland cases in which deals were recently struck involved a felony charge of interfering with police during civil disorder. Some of the assaults described in the Portland cases bear similarities to the Capitol violence. Several Capitol riot suspects are accused of using riot shields to shove police or obstruct their efforts to secure the building from the mob. Gertner said many of the Capitol cases were headed for what she called a “no-time resolution,” meaning no prison time. Judges have indicated they are trying to make sure that they avoid inconsistencies in the way they handle the hundreds of Capitol cases.
How To Talk To A Contrarian (Without Getting Into A Fight)
“But often, the contrarian person might just want to harmlessly engage in conversation or better understand you. Below, therapists and etiquette experts share some of their best advice on how to talk to a contrarian without losing your cool. “Some gadflies are existentialists who use contrarian comments to deconstruct your positions completely.”At their worst, a gadfly contrarian can be manipulative, using their commentary to gaslight their conversational victims. What’s important to note here is that the person isn’t trying to be pesky or contrarian for contrarian’s sake. If you’re close to the contrarian, tell them how their conversation habits make you feel.
Last Week, I Told My Black Son A Lie. I Hope He Never Discovers It's Untrue.
The accompanying messages: “Black Lives Matter” and “We all deserve to breathe.”But in addition to being sad, my son was afraid. The truth is that my son was not the only one being held by the grip of fear. I remembered the myriad other manifestations of institutionalized racism that endanger the lives and well-being of Black children, from the school-to-prison pipeline to housing discrimination and beyond. So, with that realization in mind, when my son looked to me for answers last week in his moment of sorrow and trepidation, I lied. And it is a lie that I pray he will never discover to be untrue.
Derek Chauvin's trial shows police reform needs to come from cops
The nation is currently fixated on the murder trial of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin. the fact that we are even at this point, with Chauvin on trial, is sadly quite remarkable. This is one of the rare instances where an officer is, in fact, on trial. So again, the fact that we are even at this point, with Chauvin on trial, is sadly quite remarkable. While we have yet to see what the results of the Chauvin trial will be, this moment feels deeply consequential.
Biden’s appeals for action on guns, policing face reality
“In this building, the legislative team, senior members of the White House staff, we are working on multiple fronts at the same time,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. Officials say Biden’s less publicly prominent role in legislative discussions on guns and policing is by design, out of risk of further politicizing already complicated negotiations. But that bill, approved by the House, is sitting in the Senate — and that’s where the the vote counting gets tricky for the Biden White House. Manchin, too, opposes the House-passed gun control bills, making their passage in the Senate all the more difficult. The White House is in frequent contact with gun control advocacy groups.
Brett Favre's bleating about politics in sports is rank with privilege, ignorance and hypocrisy
But as a human being, seeing Brett Favre still bleating the same privileged, narrow-minded, anti-Black rhetoric makes my blood boil. Repeating myths that have been disproven time and again isn't right or fair. He intimated once again that he doesn't want politics in sports, as if politics haven't been part of sports in this country for at least a century. I want to watch players play and teams win, lose, come from behind. Story continuesBrett Favre doesn't like the presence of politics in sports, as if it's something that isn't decades-old.
Yahoo Finance Presents: Dallas Mavericks CEO Cynthia Marshall
In this episode of Yahoo Finance Presents, Dallas Mavericks CEO Cynthia "Cynt" Marshall sat down with Yahoo Finance's Akiko Fujita to discuss executives' roles in sports in harboring diversity and inclusion, the Maverick's recent efforts to expand equality, and the Mavericks' process of having fans return to the stadium. And today, we are joined by the CEO of the Dallas Mavericks, Cynt Marshall. So I think between the business case for diversity, really understanding that and then having employees say, you absolutely need to be at the table. CYNT MARSHALL: I think part of that measure will be when we're not talking about it. CYNT MARSHALL: Well, we actually started bringing fans, transitioning fans back in, in early February.
Should corporations take a stand on voting rights?
Executives from Apple, Microsoft, Google and American Express have also spoken out in defense of voting rights. Why there’s debateMany Democrats have praised companies and executives that have spoken out against the new voting restrictions. Others say corporations are taking these stances out of a cynical desire to promote their financial interests, not a true moral belief in the importance of voting rights. What’s nextSeveral lawsuits have been filed challenging the Georgia law, but legal experts say it’s uncertain whether the Supreme Court’s conservative majority might allow the law to stand. Democrats in Congress are also hoping to pass a sweeping voting rights bill that would negate many of the provisions in the law.
Black soldier mistreatment common even before Virginia case
Brooklyn’s prosecutor dropped 83% of 136 more serious criminal cases, and Manhattan’s prosecutor dropped about 64% of nearly 1,000 cases. Mayors in every city except Detroit dropped all citations over which they had jurisdiction. Only about 80 of the most serious charges have so far been filed. “In other instances, there was simply not enough information to proceed on opening a criminal case.” The number of dropped cases are also relatively high in cities that witnessed more violence. The mass arrests overwhelmed already strained criminal justice systems by forcing them to contend with processing thousands of protesters.
Marxist BLM leader buys $1.4 million home in ritzy LA enclave
Patrisse Khan-Cullors, the leader of Black Lives Matter and a self-described Marxist, recently purchased a $1.4 million home in an exclusive Los Angeles neighborhood where the vast majority of residents are White, according to reports. The home, which features three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled in Topanga Canyon and has a separate guesthouse on the property, according to a celebrity real estate blog which reported the transaction last week. The property, which is about a 15 minute drive from Malibu beaches, features bamboo floors and vaulted ceilings, according to the listing. GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HEREOnce a hippie enclave in the 1960s, Topanga Canyon is now home to sprawling homes where 88 percent of the residents are White. After the sale of the property was made public, critics took to social media to blast Khan-Cullors.
GOP lawmakers react to Twitter, Facebook recent content removal decisions
Republican members of Congress are again sounding the alarm on Big Tech after recent content removal decisions by Facebook and Twitter. "Right now I think Americans need to understand they should treat the news on Facebook and Twitter with healthy skepticism," Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., told Fox News. "The Republican Study Committee is the largest conservative caucus on Capitol Hill, and we’ve made fighting Big Tech censorship a key issue this Congress. A Twitter spokesperson told Fox News on Thursday that O'Keefe was "permanently suspended for violating the Twitter rules on platform manipulation and spam ." Facebook told Fox News on Thursday that it barred the New York Post's report on BLM's Khan-Cullors’ properties from being shared on the platform for violating its "privacy and personal information policy."
How L.A. cake virtuosos learned to thrive on Instagram
Enter email address Sign Me Up You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times. Many gifted pastry chefs sought similar entrepreneurial avenues as the pandemic wreaked havoc on their livelihoods. Consider subscribing to the Los Angeles Times Your support helps us deliver the news that matters most. Pastry chefs have also found new agency by pushing their imaginations and culling loyal customers on social media apps. Bake sales headlined by our most determined, brilliant pastry chefs always sell out faster than anyone ever expects.
'Drag Race' Season 13 queens Symone and Gottmik open up
Meet Symone and Gottmik, two queens with wildly different aesthetics and a similar trailblazing spirit from Season 13, currently running Fridays on VH1. Meanwhile, Symone delivers an “unapologetically Black” blend of sass and class to “Drag Race,” matching her L.A. compatriot step for flawless step. The drag scene here, and “Drag Race” specifically, have opened up a lane for people to do drag at a different level, outside of bars. Symone, left, and Gottmik, current stars of “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” photographed in Beverly Hills. Gottmik, the first transmasculine contestant on “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” makes a potent comment on trans identity with this “Little Black Dress” look from Season 13.
Protesters march in Hollywood denouncing Daunte Wright shooting
A heavy police presence met protesters marching down the streets in Hollywood late Thursday night calling for justice after the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright during a traffic stop in a Minneapolis suburb. The city’s police chief, who has since stepped down, said he believed the officer who shot Wright intended to use a Taser, not a firearm. (Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times)Flowers and candles from a vigil for Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, who was killed by a Brooklyn Center police officer outside Minneapolis. (Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times)LAPD and a group that had been walking through the streets following a vigil come to a stand still. (Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times)
Nearly a year after George Floyd’s death, Boston area communities are reexamining policing
Nearly a year after George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police, proposals to overhaul local law enforcement and root out systemic racism are making headway in several Greater Boston communities. Policing in each of the communities has come under scrutiny in recent years. Fuller, who appointed the task force, said she will release plans for the Newton Police Department in the coming weeks. Defund NPD, a community group, criticized the recommendations and called for sweeping changes to policing in Newton and redirecting resources to other community services. In Needham, the Equal Justice in Needham group has released two reports looking at the police department.
The exhaustion of being a Black teacher in a school when you’re one of too few educators of color
But the more they want to help, the more they seem to need from the school’s few Black teachers and administrators. The parents complained to Black teachers and administrators, who then had to become the problem-solvers for a problem they did not create. In the end, he rejected Bucknell because he saw it as too similar to his mostly white high school. He said he sometimes felt frustrated as a Brookline High student because he never had a Black male teacher for any subject. He has experienced racist incidents and comforted his own Black students when they have been the targets of racism.
At Mass MoCA, Glenn Kaino builds a bridge between Bloody Sundays
NORTH ADAMS — “Hey Chris, can you trigger the heartbeat?” says Glenn Kaino, calling into the inky blackness of Mass MoCA’s cavernous Building 5. When I asked if the scale of the Mass MoCA space gave him pause in the midst of a busy year complicated by pandemic logistics, he shrugged it off in good-natured fashion. At Mass MoCA, you can take the long, long bridge disappearing into the mirror as a general metaphor for the endless march to freedom, though it’s hard to see a bridge in this context without thinking of Selma. Plants overlook Glenn Kaino's "In the Light of a Shadow" at Mass MoCA. GLENN KAINO: IN THE LIGHT OF A SHADOWAt the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, 1040 Mass MOCA Way, North Adams.
Civil suits could be the path to holding Trump accountable for the insurrection
While the idea of justice being delivered under the law makes most people think of criminal courts, it is the civil law system that could be the key to Trump and the others responsible for that brutal attack being held accountable. AdvertisementChaos erupts inside the Capitol Share Email to a Friend Embed Shots are heard inside the House chamber, an intruder invades Pelosi’s office, and Trump supporters make it into the House chamber. It is one of several civil suits Trump faces arising out of the Jan. 6 insurrection, including those filed against Trump and his associates by Representatives Bennie Thompson of Mississippi and Eric Swalwell of California. But the complaint by Blassingame and Hemby stands apart from the other civil claims in a few important ways. AdvertisementBut these suits can be a way of finally showing that no one, not even a former president, is above the law.
A seminal moment for the Asian American community
This is a seminal moment for the Asian American community, and we must act with urgency. Asian American communities’ ties to social justice movements run deep. AdvertisementThe Asian American community is the fastest growing population in both Massachusetts and the United States and is on track to become America’s largest immigrant group by 2055. Our educational systems must incorporate accurate Asian American studies into their curriculums. The Asian American story, past and present, is unique, complex, and proud, but it has rarely been fully explored and conveyed.
Red Sox acknowledge uncomfortable reality on Jackie Robinson Day: No Black players on the roster
“It’s something that I think about almost every day if not every day,” said Red Sox chief baseball officer Chaim Bloom. As they took the field against the Twins Thursday afternoon, the Red Sox joined the other 29 major league teams in honoring Jackie Robinson. AdvertisementThe Red Sox aren’t alone in their concern about the lack of representation on their roster. More than 25 Red Sox players and coaches donated their game-day salaries on Jackie Robinson Day to The Players Alliance, a nonprofit founded by current and former players to increase participation of Black Americans in baseball. That is what we’ve been hyper-focused on since last June … [on] being intentional about moving the needle to make the Boston Red Sox a more inclusive and diverse space.”The Red Sox feel they’ve made progress in that regard at top levels.
Mathews: Climate change has enabled California to change itself
California’s fight against climate change isn’t doing all that much to slow climate change. But judging California’s climate change policies by greenhouse gas emissions is backwards. Because the Golden State’s fight against climate change is about far more than just climate change. In California, climate change touches every issue. The saving grace of our desperate struggle to save the world from climate change is the opportunity it provides to change ourselves.
In wake of police shootings across US, about 75 rally for police reform in downtown Phoenix
More than 75 people gathered in downtown Phoenix on Thursday evening to protest recent police killings across the country and call for police reform. Organizer Jacob Raiford spoke to the gathering, invited attendees to speak and led a small march around the Phoenix City Council chambers. Rising Project, which organized dozens of protests against police violence in Phoenix last year. For Lee Percy Christian, who was arrested several times last year in Black Lives Matter protests in Phoenix, NOCAP is a step toward the transformative justice he wants to see. Here are their 5 goals for police reform in 2021Reach breaking news reporter Nienke Onneweer at nienke.onneweer@arizonarepublic.com or on Twitter @thenienke.
“Master,” “slave” and the fight over offensive terms in computing
By Kate Conger, The New York Times CompanyAnyone who joined a video call during the pandemic probably has a global volunteer organization called the Internet Engineering Task Force to thank for making the technology work. The Internet Engineering Task Force, or IETF, eschews voting, and it often measures consensus by asking opposing factions of engineers to hum during meetings. The group encourages participants to fight for what they believe is the best approach to a technical problem. Mallory Knodel, chief technology officer at the Center for Democracy and Technology, a policy organization, wrote a proposal suggesting that the task force use language that is more neutral. But while the industry abandons objectionable terms, there is no consensus about which new words to use.
Colorado judge to resign after use of N-word, comments on racial justice draw rare public censure
A judge in Colorado’s largest judicial district will resign after using a racial slur, employing derogatory language to speak about another judge, espousing opinions about racial justice from the bench and directing court employees to work on her personal business. Public censure of a Colorado judge is extremely rare and most disciplinary proceedings are hidden from the taxpayers who pay judges’ salaries. Chase in late January or early February of 2020 drove two lower-level court employees to a training in Pueblo. After Minneapolis police killed George Floyd in May 2020, Chase once again opined from the bench while wearing her robes about racial justice and asked a Black court employee about the Black Lives Matter movement. Chase apologized for her actions to the Colorado Commission on Judicial Discipline and said she did not intend any “racial animus” when she used the N-word.
Dwyane Wade, a Miami Heat legend, joins Utah Jazz ownership group
Former NBA star Dwyane Wade is joining the Utah Jazz ownership group. “Partnering with Ryan and the Utah Jazz is the perfect fit as we share the same vision and values,” Wade said in a statement. I’m excited to help take the Utah Jazz to the next level. “As we continue to build on the incredible legacy of the Utah Jazz franchise, we are excited to add Dwyane’s experience and expertise to the equation. "We had discussed having him join our ownership group after his retirement, but he was not prepared to commit at the time.
NWSL investigating Red Stars defender Sarah Gorden’s accusation of racial profiling after Challenge Cup opener
“Meanwhile white players were talking to white family [sic] all over the stadium.”Gorden said she didn’t think the security guard’s threat was racially motivated until she saw white players with their families. “We would like to assure her and the Red Stars organization that our staff was entirely focused on COVID safety. The Red Stars said they’ve been in communication with the Dash about the matter. “The Chicago Red Stars have been in touch with Houston Dash and the league to understand what occurred. We are awaiting a statement from Houston on the matter,” the Red Stars said in a statement.
2 arrested during Adam Toledo protests in Logan Square, including son of Black Lives Matter Chicago leader
Two people were arrested Friday night as hundreds of protesters gathered in Logan Square demanding justice for Adam Toledo, 13, who was shot and killed by a Chicago police officer last month in Little Village. McCullom’s mother, Black Lives Matter Chicago Executive Director Amika Tendaji, said her son was trying to stop officers from attacking protesters when he was put in handcuffs. “There was nothing that happened out there that warranted the arrest of any young people who were out there fighting for their lives,” Tendaji said. “If folks keep getting arrested, the idea is that we will be too afraid to keep fighting back, but at this point we have no choice. We’re fighting for our lives.”
Police: No videos found of protester raising gun at officers
A public review of evidence in the fatal police shooting of Jorge Gomez, a Black Lives Matter protester, concluded Friday after several hours of testimony. Four Las Vegas police officers shot and killed Gomez during a Black Lives Matter protest in June. Jorge Gomez, a Black Lives Matter protester, was shot and killed in June by four Las Vegas police officers. “You can’t find videos of something that never happened,” Gomez’s mother, Jeanne Llera, later told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. LVMPD report on Jorge Gomez… by Las Vegas Review-Journal
Protest against police killings ends peacefully on Las Vegas Strip
(Kevin Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal)Protesters march on the Las Vegas Strip on Saturday, April 17, 2021. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoPeople protest on the Strip in Las Vegas Saturday, April 17, 2021, following the fatal police shooting of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minnesota. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoPeople protest on the Strip in Las Vegas Saturday, April 17, 2021, following the fatal police shooting of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minnesota. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoPeople protest on the Strip in Las Vegas Saturday, April 17, 2021, following the fatal police shooting of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minnesota. Cannon/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @KMCannonPhotoProtesters, including Maria Hayden of Las Vegas, left, march near the The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas on the Strip in Las Vegas Saturday, April 17, 2021, following the fatal police shooting of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Minnesota.
Coronavirus hug image named World Press Photo of the Year
By MIKE CORDERTHE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A photo symbolizing “love and compassion” of an 85-year-old Brazilian woman getting her first embrace in five months from a nurse through a transparent “hug curtain” was named the World Press Photo of the Year on Thursday. “This iconic image of COVID-19 memorializes the most extraordinary moment of our lives, everywhere,” jury member Kevin WY Lee said of the hug image. Nissen also won World Press Photo of the Year in 2015 with an intimate photo of a gay couple in Russia. Winner in the Spot News Singles category was an image embodying the debate on race in the United States. Associated Press photographer Maya Alleruzzo took second place in the category with a story about the Islamic State group enslaving Yazidi women in Iraq.
Protests continue Saturday in Brooklyn Center and Stillwater
They said Orput’s filing of second-degree manslaughter charges against Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter in the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright did not go far enough. She added that she didn’t agree with the curfew in place in Brooklyn Center, which began at 11 p.m., and hoped that the protest would continue. The protest marked the seventh night of unrest in Brooklyn Center after the fatal shooting of Wright, 20. Elsewhere, a group of University of Minnesota medical students and doctors marched to the Brooklyn Center Police Department to speak out against police using non-lethal weapons during protests. Most protesters who gathered Friday evening in Brooklyn Center were vocal, but peaceful.
Post Daunte Wright: Are we in the era of cops getting charged criminally?
Have we entered a new era, one in which police are charged criminally when they kill people under questionable — or worse — circumstances? In his trial, Yanez argued self-defense, testifying that he believed Castile, whom he had pulled over for a traffic violation in Falcon Heights, was reaching for a gun. His last words were, “I wasn’t reaching for it.”A jury found Yanez not guilty, but Choi stands by his decision. OTHER CASESOne thing is clear: In the short history of Minnesota cops being criminally charged, the numbers are growing. St. Louis County prosecutors have charged an officer with an unjustified shooting for their first time as well.
How an active duty airman tried to start a civil war
Experts in extremist militia groups have long regarded the Boogaloo Bois as having no real hierarchy or leadership structure. Once he joined the Air Force and met others from around the world, “talking to people changed my whole views,” he said. (The Air Force said it could not immediately locate the records it needed to comment about this incident.) When asked in an interview about his involvement with the Grizzly Scouts, Carrillo responded evasively. Instead, he forthrightly proclaimed his support for the Boogaloo Bois and repeatedly challenged what he views as misconceptions about the group.
Opinion: We live in two nations, separate and unequal
Rich White and Mr. Poor White strike a bargain,” adapted from a chapter in Lillian Smith’s 1949 book, “Killers of the Dream.”“Two jobs need to be done,” Mr. Rich White said. Your job is to keep the Black man – and the Latino, Asian, Indigenous man, and women, too – in their place. “But,” Mr. Rich White said, “you won’t see me anywhere. I’ll stay behind the scenes.”So why does American society continue to see tense and often deadly interactions between African Americans and police? He is a visiting instructor of social justice and journalism at Miami University, Oxford.
20 years after Timothy Thomas, civil unrest, we still talk about progress and work to be done
This week marks 20 years since 19-year-old Timothy Thomas was killed by Cincinnati Police officer Stephen Roach, an incident that sparked civil unrest in downtown Cincinnati and created urgency around local police reform. We in Cincinnati patted ourselves on the back for the Collaborative Agreement that was put in place after the civil unrest here and for the improvement in police-community relations over the past 20 years. So we asked ourselves, what should The Enquirer do to do mark the 20 years since the 2001 riots? Note to readers: In Enquirer-produced content we are using "civil unrest" to refer to the entirety of what transpired in April 2001. Rioting was part of the civil unrest, but the civil unrest included much more.
'Ohio Shorts' — Wexner Center's experimental film program — to be shown at South Drive-In
(The Wexner Center’s film/video theatre, where “Ohio Shorts” would normally be held, has been closed since the start of the pandemic.) The program will also be available to view on the arts center’s website, wexarts.org, starting Saturday and continuing through May 1. “Prentiss was the ideal curator/juror for this program because of his story and his relationship to ‘Ohio Shorts,’” said Jennifer Lange, curator of the film/video studio program at the Wexner Center. The Wexner Center’s film/video theatre can accommodate 298 individuals during a non-pandemic year, but last year’s online program drew views from close to 2,000 people around the world, Lange said. “It’s made for a fun time, in times when you want to stay safe.”tonguetteauthor2@aol.comAt a glanceThe Wexner Center for the Arts’ “Ohio Shorts” program will be screened at about 8:40 p.m. Thursday at the South Drive-In Theatre, 3050 S. High St. Gates open at about 7:30 p.m.
Letters: Struggling care workers happy to be part of 'infrastructure' bill
Letters to the EditorStruggling care workers happy to be part of 'infrastructure' billAs a former care provider for adults with developmental disabilities, I was elated to see the president’s infrastructure plan included a $400 billion investment in quality home care. More:'We can't delay': Biden proposes $2 trillion infrastructure, jobs plan funded by corporate tax hikeOhio’s care system has been overwhelmed for decades. Most care providers do not make a living wage and many lack access to quality healthcare themselves. Care workers don’t deserve to be stressed out over their finances, as well. Care providers should be able to make a career out of the wonderful work they do, even if it means Amazon has to pay a little bit more in taxes.
Protesters at Statehouse call for end to police killings of Black men and women
About 150 protesters marched under cloudy skies and a police helicopter through Downtown on Saturday as they called for justice in recent police killings of Black men and women around the country. The peaceful protest and subsequent march was the culmination of recent police shootings of Black men that represent a "multi-generational" struggle, Yakita said. >>Read More:Body camera footage and names of two Columbus officers in fatal St. Ann's shooting releasedAs they marched, protesters chanted "no justice, no peace" and shouted expletives about law enforcement. Westerville police Chief Charles Chandler said at least one St. Ann's security officer also had fired a weapon. Aramis Sundiata, executive director of the People's Justice Project, called for revolution to prevent future police killings in the Black community.
Columbus police helicopter spells out 'CPD' as council members criticize skywriting 'joyride'
A Columbus Division of Police helicopter flew and circled over the city early Saturday morning in a pattern that spelled out "CPD" in the air. (You can view the flight path here via FlightAware.) Council member Rob Dorans, who supported Brown's legislation to reduce the CPD helicopter fleet, also chimed in on Twitter, writing, "We were told over and over again how essential every second of airtime was. In June 2020, The Dispatch reported the city's annual maintenance costs for the CPD helicopter fleet at $452,000 and fuel costs at $249,000. During the time between dispatched runs, the pilot flew the "CPD" pattern in less than 10 minutes and at "normal patrol altitude," according to police.
Oklahoma bill granting immunity to drivers fleeing riots heads to Gov. Kevin Stitt's desk
The Senate gave final passage to House Bill 1674 by Rep. Kevin West, R-Moore, and Sen. Rob Standridge, R-Norman, that protects drivers if they feel fleeing from a riot is necessary to escape serious injury or death. Other bills going to Governor StittThe Oklahoma House on Wednesday gave final passage to Senate Bill 403 that prevents Oklahomans from willfully interfering or disrupting local public meetings. Rep. Robert Manger, R-Oklahoma City, said the bill requested by Oklahoma County stems from when protesters interrupted some county meetings. Correction: A previous version of this story included incorrect information about the votes on House Bill 1674 and House Bill 1643.
Mary Sanchez: Want to reform policing? Start by making them good listeners.
Each is a seemingly innocuous occurrence, actions that anyone across America might do on any day of the week. However, it’s crucial that policing reform efforts drill down beyond appearances to examine the events that led up to that point. Obviously, every situation is different and hindsight makes things clearer, but de-escalation skills are pretty basic: the ability to slow a situation down, active listening, short commands, a calm voice. Additional training in checking implicit bias, understanding how people in a mental health crisis react are another layer of crucial skills. Readers can reach Mary Sanchez at msanchezcolumn@gmail.com and follow her on Twitter @msanchezcolumn.
24 winning photos from the World Press Photo of the Year contest
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A photo symbolizing “love and compassion” of an 85-year-old Brazilian woman getting her first embrace in five months from a nurse through a transparent “hug curtain” was named the World Press Photo of the Year on Thursday. It was the second time the Danish photographer who shot the image has won the prestigious award. Nissen also won World Press Photo of the Year in 2015 with an intimate photo of a gay couple in Russia. Winner in the Spot News Singles category was an image embodying the debate on race in the United States. Associated Press photographer Maya Alleruzzo took second place in the category with a story about the Islamic State group enslaving Yazidi women in Iraq.
Report: Feds went undercover at protests in ABQ
Medina, who was the deputy chief over field services, was involved in overseeing the department’s response to the protests. “Chief Medina is livid about this report of the department’s possible involvement with federal, undercover agents,” Gilbert Gallegos, an APD spokesman, wrote in a statement. According to emails published on CREW’s website, the first request from an APD commander was made two days after protests began in earnest in Albuquerque. “Seven SAs (special agents) from the Albuquerque DO (Division Office) will provide surveillance support,” Williamson wrote. Activists who spent the summer organizing protests and fighting for change said they were not surprised to read the investigative report.
Louisville documentary explores division in city spurred by public art, Castleman statue
After repeated acts of vandalism, on June 8, 2020, city workers lifted The John B. Castleman statue off of its base in the Cherokee Triangle neighborhood. "Statues: This Is What We Stand For" is an hourlong documentary by local filmmaker Morgan Atkinson that focuses on statues like the Castleman statue in Cherokee Triangle and the divisions caused by them. From the public hearings around the Castleman statue to the Black Lives Matter protests, "Statues: This Is What We Stand For" captures the conversation around statues in Louisville and pulls them together in the hour-long film. His casket was draped with an American flag and a Confederate flag, per his wishes, according to a 1918 Courier Journal article. On April 20 at 5:30 p.m., the documentary film will premiere on Facebook followed by a live-streamed panel discussion to debate public art at 6:30 p.m.Also:Louisville removed the Castleman statue.
Publishing company Simon & Schuster won't distribute wounded cop's book on Breonna Taylor
Simon & Schuster distributes books by writers published by Post Hill Press, but it will not do so with this book. Authors and activists took to social media to bash Simon & Schuster, which is no stranger to controversy. "Simon & Schuster really embraces villainy," tweeted Roxane Gay, a best-selling author and professor. A Simon & Schuster post from May 2020 quickly surfaced among the backlash, in which the company declared Black lives matter. She also encouraged Black writers to post their books that Simon & Schuster could distribute instead of Mattingly's book.
Sheriffs in Scott County investigating white supremacist pamphlets left in neighborhood
An investigation into racist reading materials left in a Central Kentucky county has led to a law enforcement investigation after uproar in the community. The Scott County Sheriff’s Department is searching for the individuals who left pamphlets promoting a white supremacist group at several homes in Mallard Point, a Georgetown subdivision just north of Lexington. Eddie Hart told the newspaper that sheriffs are investigating whether someone in the neighborhood distributed them. The pamphlets contained messages against Black Americans and against the Black Lives Matter community and contained images of swastikas. A request for comment seeking an update on the status of the investigation was not immediately returned Friday afternoon by a Scott County Sheriff’s spokesman.
James O’Keefe of Project Veritas vows revenge on CNN and Twitter after ban
James O’Keefe of Project Veritas, which was founded in 2010 “to investigate and expose corruption, dishonesty, self-dealing, waste, fraud and other misconduct,” according to its website. “The CNN material was the most devastating material in Project Veritas history,” O’Keefe said. Project Veritas was founded in 2010 “to investigate and expose corruption, dishonesty, self-dealing, waste, fraud and other misconduct,” according to its website. Project Veritas filed the suit against the Times last November, asking the paper to retract two stories about a Project Veritas video accusing Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) of voter fraud. Two Times stories called the Project Veritas video deceptive and probably part of a “coordinated disinformation campaign.”O’Keefe is battle-tested.
Is capitalism really coming to the rescue of American democracy?
Sign up for the Guardian's Fight to Vote newsletterDespite a wave of public statements by corporations opposing legislation that would make it harder for people to vote, election reform advocates doubt American capitalism is really coming to the rescue of American democracy. But past corporate interventions in social justice campaigns, including statements of solidarity with Black Lives Matter protesters last summer, did not go far beyond words, activists say. “These corporations are pandering to a big lie that is being used to justify voter suppression. Corporations increasingly feel pressure from consumers and in some cases employees on social and political issues, Serazio said. “They have to choose whether to side with an increasingly authoritarian [Republican party], or the majority of their workers and their consumers.
Most charges against George Floyd protesters dropped, analysis shows
The vast majority of citations and charges against George Floyd protesters were ultimately dropped, dismissed or otherwise not filed, according to a Guardian analysis of law enforcement records and media reports in a dozen jurisdictions around the nation. Still, data shows that a majority of felony charges were also dropped, which some prosecutors said was due to a lack of evidence. Mayors in every city except Detroit dropped all citations over which they had jurisdiction. Meanwhile, Brooklyn’s prosecutor dropped 83% of 136 more serious criminal cases, and Manhattan’s prosecutor dropped about 64% of nearly 1,000 cases. The mass arrests overwhelmed already strained criminal justice systems by forcing them to contend with processing thousands of protesters.
Wilhelm Reich: the strange, prescient sexologist who sought to set us free
The writer and civil rights activist James Baldwin read Reich, as did many of the second-wave feminists. As he listened to his patients speak, his attention kept straying to their bodies, lying guarded and rigid on the couch. Reich believed the orgone accumulator could automate the work of liberation, obviating the need for laborious person-to-person therapy. The tragedy of Reich’s life is that nearly a hundred years later, these systems remain as powerful as ever. As Reich knew, it requires work, a labour every single living person can choose to hinder or advance.
‘I’m not ready for other people’s sweat to drip on me’: will clubbing survive the pandemic?
Born and raised in Tottenham, where she still lives, she started going to raves at 14, back in the mid-90s. I miss being in the dark, hearing the music, feeling the bass reverberating through my body, rearranging my organs. I’m not so desperate to be in a club that I’ll think, ‘Oh, who cares, let’s just all go in there and catch Covid together,’” she laughs. “I’m waiting to see what happens before making my way to any big events. Each pilot event will test various combinations of controls, including specialised ventilation systems for indoor events, social distancing and a Covid certification scheme – AKA vaccine passports.
Daunte Wright and George Floyd: another chapter in America’s recurring tragedy
‘Murder, it was murder’It was 12.15 on Monday afternoon when police in Brooklyn Center released body camera footage showing the moment Daunte Wright was killed. But as the prosecution in the Chauvin case rested on Monday, the fate of officer Potter remained distinctly unclear. A memorial to George Floyd has a new addition commemorating Daunte Wright in Minneapolis. Naisha Wright, Daunte’s aunt, chanted her nephew’s name as she wore a T-shirt with George Floyd’s image. A demonstrator protests the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright outside the Brooklyn Center police department on 16 April.
SNP to force schoolchildren to 'face the UK's colonial past' in Black Lives Matter-inspired lessons
The SNP has published plans to force Scottish schoolchildren to "face the UK's colonial past" in Black Lives Matter-inspired history lessons. The SNP included the pledge to commission a taxpayer-funded teaching programme inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement in its manifesto for the Holyrood elections next month - which opinion polls suggest the party will almost certainly win. This would highlight “Scotland and the UK’s colonial history” and all schools would be urged to adopt it. "A good history programme would recognise the importance of understanding the contexts in which this horrific trade in human beings was then conducted. “The recent Black Lives Matter movement has shone a powerful spotlight on continuing racial injustice and race-based violence, and the need for countries to face their colonial history.
It’s an emergency, call the police! Not the real police – we need Line of Duty
(Later I discovered that this chap has been a star of Line of Duty for nine years, so it probably isn’t a clue. Whole first series now gobbled; and ooh, it’s good isn’t it? Two weeks later, the same force shut down a Good Friday church service for alleged Covid breaches. “The police are the public and the public are the police”, that’s what Robert Peel said. Line of Duty is an intricate depiction of the authentic human mess his principle should create: good, bad, heroic, reluctant, unsullied, corrupt, glorious and terrible and representative.
Daunte Wright protester subtly trolls Trump’s soup comments during CNN interview
A protester has taken a subtle dig at an infamous comment from former president Donald Trump during a live interview on CNN on Wednesday. Protests have continued for a fourth night in Brooklyn Center, Minneapolis after 20-year-old Daunte Wright was shot by a police officer after refusing arrest during a traffic stop. evening and spoke to CNN and curiously had a can of soup in his hand. Speaking at the National Association of Police Organisations, Trump claimed that the protesters were specifically throwing cans of soup, that was apparently ‘for their family’, at the police. And they throw the cans of soup,” the ex-POTUS said adding: “That’s better than a brick because you can’t throw a brick—it’s too heavy.
Patrisse Cullors: BLM founder breaks down in interview over right-wing attacks on her new home
Black Lives Matter (BLM) co-founder Patrisse Cullors held back tears while discussing criticism she faced last week over her housing portfolio, worth $3m (£2.17m). The way that I live my life is a direct support to Black people, including my Black family members, first and foremost. Please enter your email address Please enter a valid email address Please enter a valid email address SIGN UP Thanks for signing up to the Inside Washington newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. Read our privacy notice Thanks for signing up to the Inside Washington newsletter {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} I would like to be emailed about offers, events and updates from The Independent. “We have to stay focused on white supremacy,’ she added as she urged people to ‘see through the right-wing lies,’” Ms Cullors added.
Video: Police use smoke to disperse protesters from Brooklyn Center
Video: 'Check yourself and check your humanity': Lizzo sounds off amid ongoing social unrest following police killing of Daunte WrightPolice use smoke to disperse Black Lives Matter protesters from Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. The group were there protesting the death of Daunte Wright.
Cardi B DELETES tweet saying 'We need cops and that's facts' after being slammed online
Within a few hours of posting, Cardi B had deleted her tweet. Cardi B has been much more critical of the police in other posts. Cardi B has been outspoken in the past about issues involving police brutality and supports the Black Lives Matter movement, in addition to Bernie Sanders. Cardi B said, 'Seeing people looting and going extremely outraged, it makes me feel like, ‘Yes! 'I feel like I have done videos against police brutality, I feel like this is like my seventh time,' Cardi B added.
Sharon Osbourne gives both barrels to 'cancel culture' zealots
'I know my part, but I know I'm not a racist.' I know my part, but I know I'm not a racist.' I’m going to do a podcast and we’re negotiating a movie of Ozzy’s life story. You feel like: “God, have I got to tell them about this to prove I’m not racist?” I’m not racist. ‘We honestly don’t know.
Elite Hollywood school where parents say white children are taught they are all racists
With its manicured lawns and gently swaying palms, Harvard-Westlake is the school of choice for the children of Hollywood's elite. Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington and Cybill Shepherd also sent their children to 'HW', as the school is affectionately known. There is even a new term for what is going on in this and many other schools in liberal Hollywood: woke weaning. Kate Beckinsale and Michael Sheen attend their daughter Lily's High School graduation in 2017Earlier this year, the San Diego Unified School District introduced training which told white teachers they were guilty of 'spirit murdering' black children. The mother of a pupil at another school in Hollywood said that minority students were being encouraged to gather separately from white pupils.
Maskless BLM protester says he is 'dying' from COVID outside home of disgraced Army Drill Sergeant
A maskless Black Lives Matter protester and Air Force veteran was captured on video saying he was 'sick' and 'dying' from COVID-19 at a rally outside the home of disgraced Army Drill Sergeant Jonathan Pentland. A maskless Black Lives Matter protester and Air Force veteran was captured on video saying he was 'sick' and 'dying' from COVID-19 at a rally outside the home of disgraced Army Drill Sergeant Jonathan PentlandShea Harley, an Air Force veteran, speaks at the protest in the Summit neighborhood today. The soldier asks where Deandre lives and claims he is 'harassing the neighborhood'. The Staff Sergeant repeatedly yells at him and gets in his face, saying: 'You're in the wrong neighborhood. Pentland has been suspended from his drill instructor role pending the outcome of the Department of Justice assault charge.
Father who pulled daughter from NYC's $54K-a-year Brearly School says 'someone had to speak out'
April 13, 2021Dear Fellow Brearley Parents,Our family recently made the decision not to reenroll our daughter at Brearley for the 2021-22 school year. I object to the charge of systemic racism in this country, and at our school. Systemic racism, properly understood, is segregated schools and separate lunch counters. Systemic racism is unequivocally not a small number of isolated incidences over a period of decades. Over the past several months, I have personally spoken to many Brearley parents as well as parents of children at peer institutions.
Fury as Maxine Waters tells Minnesota BLM protesters 'we've got to get more confrontational'
AdvertisementCalifornia Representative Maxine Waters joined protesters in Minnesota as demonstrations entered a seventh night on Saturday after the death of Daunte Wright. Waters told the protesters at Brooklyn Center that she will fight for justice on their behalf and urged them to 'to get more confrontational' - just one day after protests descended into violence. 'We gotta stay on the street,' Waters was recorded saying, adding that protesters needed 'to get more confrontational' and they should ignore the curfew in place. Pictured: Congresswoman Maxine Waters leaving the protest at the Brooklyn Center Police Department on SaturdayMaxine Waters (D-CA) joins demonstrators in a protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station on Saturday nightMaxine Waters (D-CA) joins demonstrators in a protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station on Saturday nightWaters is planning on staying in town until Monday. The protesters stood outside of Orput's home before marching through is neighborhood in Stillwater.
‘We’re paying attention’: Vigils, rallies planned in George Floyd’s honor ahead of Derek Chauvin trial
Local activists planned rallies and vigils Sunday to honor Floyd's life and draw attention to the case. In Derek Chauvin case, a weary city that wears George Floyd's face waits for an answerWho's on the jury? Russell said he watched most of jury selection over the last three weeks and planned to continue following the trial. Protesters – some chanting, drumming and holding portraits of Floyd – demonstrated outside the courthouse throughout the 11-day jury selection process, which concluded last week. Jury selection in the trial began in early March.
Derek Chauvin Trial: What To Know About The Charges, Jurors And More
Trial BeginsJury selection for Chauvin’s trial began March 9 and lasted roughly two weeks before wrapping up on Tuesday. 44 is a white woman in her 50s who serves as an executive of a nonprofit health care advocacy organization. 55 is a white woman in her 50s who works as an executive assistant at a health care clinic. 91 is a Black woman in her 60s who worked in marketing before retiring. 118 is a white woman in her 20s who is a social worker.
Musical notation branded 'colonialist' by Oxford professors hoping to 'decolonise' the curriculum
Musical notation has been branded "colonialist" by Oxford professors hoping to reform their courses to focus less on white European culture, The Telegraph can reveal. Academics are deconstructing the university's music offering after facing pressure to "decolonise" the curriculum following the Black Lives Matter protests. The Telegraph has seen proposals for changes to undergraduate courses, in which some staff question the current curriculum's "complicity in white supremacy". Professors said the classical repertoire taught at Oxford, which spans works by Mozart and Beethoven, focuses too much on "white European music from the slave period". Documents reveal that faculty members, who decide on courses that form the music degree, have proposed reforms to address this "white hegemony", including rethinking the study of musical notation because it is a "colonialist representational system".
Duchess of Cambridge recycles Sézane Margeurite Blouse
The Duchess of Cambridge appeared effortlessly stylish as she recycled a Sézane blouse for a portrait inside her new photo book released today. It is not the first that she's worn her now out of stock Sézane Margeurite blouse, having previously teamed it with a wine coloured jumper for the Cambridge's Christmas card 2020 and with a Troy London jacket at an engagement in 2019. The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured) recycled a Sézane Margeurite blouse and wine colour sweater for a photograph to accompany her new photo bookKate's photograph for her Hold Still project is believed to have been taken during the Christmas card photoshoot, as she is seen wearing the same minimalist make-up and subtle accessories. Fashion stylist Rochelle White, told Femail: 'I love that Kate opted for the wine colour jumper and frilly blouse under it. However, Kate has been know for recycling her garments and this jumper we have seen before on the family Christmas card in 2020.
Oklahoma County jail inmate shot, killed after hostage situation
Oklahoma City police shot and killed an inmate at the Oklahoma County jail after a hostage situation Saturday night involving a guard. The Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office responded just before 4:30 p.m. after the detention officer was taken hostage. Oklahoma County Sheriff's Department officials asked for help from the Oklahoma City Police Department because the sheriff's office didn't have enough staff to enter the jail. “The inhumane conditions of the Oklahoma County jail are horrendous.”Dickerson joined others standing outside the jail earlier in the day, waiting for word of what happened. The control of the jail shifted to the Oklahoma County Jail Trust in July from the sheriff's department.
What to Know About the Trial of Derek Chauvin
What to Know About the Trial of Derek Chauvin Mr. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, faces charges of manslaughter, second-degree murder and third-degree murder in the death of George Floyd. The jury in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin has been seated. Video transcript Back bars 0:00 / 1:11 - 0:00 transcript Final Juror Selected in Derek Chauvin Murder Trial The final member of the jury was interviewed and seated Tuesday for the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd. Judge denies motion to delay Derek Chauvin trial. Video transcript Back bars 0:00 / 0:47 - 0:00 transcript Judge Denies Motion to Delay Derek Chauvin Trial On Friday, Judge Peter A. Cahill of Hennepin County District Court, who is overseeing the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis officer charged in the death of George Floyd, denied the defense team’s request for a trial delay.
The Mailbox | This cowardly social-media bullying of athletes must desist
What is wrong with these people who feel they must destroy this young man through faceless social media? Fausto J. Garofalo Jr., ColumbusEditor: On Friday, March 19, the Ohio State men’s basketball team lost to Oral Roberts and was bounced from the NCAA Tournament. Wrap the entire matter up in one weekend, eliminate the “mad,” and protect the safety of our athletes. Editor: I’m happy OSU lost, but not for the reason you might think. John Watson, via emailJohn: The real trick here is how you introduced the Black Lives Matter movement into a discussion about basketball players kneeling in protest.
Protest laws move UK towards paramilitary policing, says former chief
A former police chief has warned that new protest laws move Britain dangerously in the direction of “paramilitary policing” and that UK ministers are “flexing their muscles via their police forces” like repressive regimes around the world. Police chiefs will be seen as the arbiters of what is and is not allowed when it comes to protest. Fahy, the former chief constable of Greater Manchester police and former vice-chair of the police chiefs’ body, said the proposed protest laws were a mistake and posed a danger for policing. The policing of protest can cause long-term damage.”Fahy added: “Policing is not always about the majority, sometimes it is about protecting rights of the minority. “It is wrong to claim these measures will stop people from carrying out their civic right to protest.
Derek Chauvin trial: Why role of TV cameras could come into focus
One of those cameras will be trained on Derek Chauvin, the former policeman accused of killing George Floyd in custody. Mr Chauvin could be jailed for decades over the 25 May, 2020 death of Mr Floyd, an unarmed black man. Court TV believes its coverage of The People vs Derek Chauvin will uphold both of those constitutional rights. Having relaunched under new ownership in 2019, Court TV sees the Chauvin trial as more than a throwback to those glory days. The Chauvin trial, she added, is "a return to our mission, our mission is to give people a front-row seat to justice".
Here are the jurors who will decide if Derek Chauvin is guilty of murder or manslaughter in George Floyd's death
Over about two weeks, lawyers for the prosecution and defense quizzed potential jurors about their knowledge of Floyd’s death, their opinions of Chauvin, and their attitudes about police, racial injustice, and the protests and rioting that followed Floyd’s death. Quote iconShe said she believes her community improved because of the massive protests that took place after Floyd’s death. Activists: Floyd's death spurred global change George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police set the nation ablaze. Referring to the protestors who lashed out after Floyd’s death, she said, “maybe they felt they were never heard. The organization might bear a small measure of responsibility for the rioting after Floyd’s death, he said.
‘It’s for the people’: how George Floyd Square became a symbol of resistance – and healing
The sign on a barricade on a once-unassuming street in Minneapolis reads: “You’re now entering the free state of George Floyd”. To activists and community members, it’s George Floyd Square. “It’s for everybody in the world that wants to come here.”Marcia Howard, left, a group organizer, addresses activists and neighbors at George Floyd Square on 4 March. Photograph: Nicholas Pfosi/ReutersGeorge Floyd Square falls between Minneapolis’ eighth and ninth wards, represented respectively by city council member Alondra Cano and council vice-president Andrea Jenkins. She recently told the Guardian that the prospect of Chauvin’s trial was “traumatic” and that the neighborhood of George Floyd Square was struggling amid the aftermath of Floyd’s death and the coronavirus pandemic.
University of Oxford considers scrapping sheet music for being 'too colonial'
The University of Oxford is considering scrapping sheet music for being 'too colonial' after staff raised concerns about the 'complicity in white supremacy' in music curriculums. University staff have argued that the current curriculum focuses on 'white European music from the slave period', according to The Telegraph. The University of Oxford (Merton College pictured) is considering scrapping sheet music for being 'too colonial' after staff raised concerns about the 'complicity in white supremacy' in music curriculumsDocuments seen by the publication indicate proposed reforms to target undergraduate courses. It comes after one Oxford college removed the name of an 18th-century slave trader from its main library earlier this year - but has defied calls to take down his statue. The former college fellow who died in 1710 bequeathed £10,000 to the library which has since been unofficially known as the Codrington Library.
'Stop Asian Hate' rallies held across SoCal and nationwide; demonstrators decry rise in violence
"We need to continue to be loud and stand together to stop hate crimes,'' Los Angeles County Supervisor Holly Mitchell said. "Now is not the time to be silent, let's continue to support each other and speak out against hate. But the Asian community has sort of swallowed it. ""We want to tell the world ... that enough is enough," said Steven Kang, director of external affairs for the Koreatown Youth and Community Center in Los Angeles. ''A candlelight vigil to fight against AAPI hate was also scheduled to be held at Chinatown Central Plaza from 6-7:15 p.m. Assemblywoman Wendy Carrillo, D-Los Angeles, is set to speak.
Biden walks the union line, making a play for blue-collar workers
Seth Harris, now a top labor adviser to Biden, wrote a script for a Biden video promoting the union effort. Many Democrats admit Trump outmaneuvered them with his direct, blunt appeals to White workers. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) wrote an op-ed voicing carefully calibrated support for the Amazon union drive. ADIn his first two months, Biden has aggressively sought to cement support from unions and workers. While Biden has positioned himself staunchly alongside the Amazon workers, he also has some associations with the company through his vast political network.
Oklahoma City sees protest outside jail following hostage drama
A group of protesters gathered outside the Oklahoma County Detention Center in Oklahoma City on Saturday night, after the jail was placed on lockdown following a hostage situation that resulted in officers killing an inmate. The guard, who was not identified, was able to leave the building under his own power, Williams told The Oklahoman. Outside the lockup, the leader of the city’s Black Lives Matter chapter said the Oklahoma County jail was known for adverse conditions for inmates. "The inhumane conditions of the Oklahoma County jail are horrendous." CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPInmates have complained of moldy food, lack of water and lack of showers, Dickerson told the newspaper.
'Stop the hate!': Hundreds rally in downtown Chandler to support Asian community Sunday
Over 10% of Chandler's population is Asian, according to 2019 estimates. "Asian Americans are underneath attack and it’s time for us – even I, as an African American need to stand beside my Asian brothers and sister and let them know that we need to stop Asian hate." Community outrage over anti-Asian violenceThere has been an increase in attacks against Asian Americans since the COVID-19 pandemic started a year ago. The actual number of anti-Asian incidents is most likely much higher because many incidents go unreported, Jeung said. One in four Americans, including nearly half of Asian Americans, in recent weeks, have seen someone blame Asian people for the coronavirus epidemic, a new USA TODAY/Ipsos Poll found.
Funding Hate: How extremists like the ones who attacked the Capitol are making money off the internet
Monetizing extremist contentIn the past, hate groups raised money by means such as charging dues, selling products or requiring the purchase of uniforms. In fact, crowdfunding and online content monetization enabled the extremists behind the “Stop the Steal” movement to make anti-democratic organizing a livelihood. Far-right activist and self-described “Stop the Steal” national organizer Ali Alexander, for example, has relied on websites like GiveSendGo, an alternative to the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe, to secure funding for his activities. Instead of Patreon, a crowdfunding site popular with artists, journalists, musicians and other creators, extremists could use sites like Hatreon, founded by antigovernment extremist Cody Wilson. Crowdfunding sites played a critical role in the Capitol insurrection, providing money to help people to travel to Washington.
What Derek Chauvin’s trial in the death of George Floyd means for America
“The irony is that race may not come up in the actual courtroom during the trial. ADADBut Moriarty said the ongoing pandemic may also have contributed to the makeup of the Chauvin jury in other ways, pointing to the large number of young people on the jury, including people of color. He did not tell Floyd who he was or what he was investigating, causing Floyd to panic, cry and beg officers not to kill him. Thao suggested placing Floyd on the ground, where Lane held Floyd’s legs, Kueng held his back and Chauvin pinned him at the neck. “One question would be, should they try to communicate to the jury that Chauvin is not a racist?” Butler, the Georgetown Law professor, said.
Recap: Jury selection for Derek Chauvin trial completed, opening arguments to begin Monday
Jury selection was completed this week in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. She said the negativity mostly came from constant news reports about Floyd’s death. In the video, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck as Floyd is on the ground pleading for air. He said his workplace held a discussion about preventing racism after Floyd’s death, and that he read a book on the subject. Potential jurors have been questioned at length about their exposure to media coverage of Floyd’s death as well as on race and law enforcement.
'We've been waiting for this moment:' Rally for Asian Americans in Fort Lee draws over 700
I don't think there's ever been a moment when Asian Americans had a movement." Many people, she said, view Asian Americans, even those born in the U.S., as foreigners — and have blamed them for the COVID-19 virus because it is believed to have begun in China. "You are police officers, our Planning Board, you are our council members," he said to Asian Americans in the crowd. This year, as hate crimes against Asian Americans have grown during the pandemic, an Anti-Defamation League survey found that 17% of Asian Americans said they had been harassed online, an increase of more than 50% from last year. Son, a rally organizer, said people across the nation have "become more racially conscious" over the past year and that Asian Americans are feeling threatened as perhaps never before.
'We Not Human At All.' Why the Fight to Unionize an Alabama Amazon Warehouse Could Spur a Labor Union Resurgence
After months of organizing and infighting, he will learn whether he was successful in helping to unionize the first Amazon warehouse in the country after the seven-week voting period ends on March 29. Unlike many unionization battles, the central issue at stake for Amazon and its Bessemer workers isn’t just about money. In 2014, a tiny number of technicians and mechanics who maintained order-fulfillment equipment at a distribution center in Middletown, Delaware participated in the first-ever unionization vote at an Amazon warehouse. But there are signals of a union revival, and the Bessemer workers have gained support from prominent national politicians. Public support for labor unions is also widening: According to a September 2020 Gallup report, 65% of Americans approved of labor unions, a high point that hadn’t been reached in nearly two decades.
Giancarlo Stanton agrees with Tony Clark about asking to move All-Star Game from Atlanta
TAMPA, Fla. — Giancarlo Stanton is on board with union chief Tony Clark, who floated the possibility this past week of having discussions with MLB requesting that this year’s All-Star Game be moved from Atlanta after Georgia passed a law that would appear to disproportionally affect voters of color. Talk about it, get the best game plan and move forward with it." "As it relates to the All-Star Game, we have not had a conversation with the league on that issue. "As we get to that point and we know more, I will make a better decision. But I do think that if it gets to that point, it will certainly be a decision I have to make personally."
Charlottesville mayor's poem about city, racism 'hits nerve'
Charlottesville, she wrote, “lynched you, hung the noose at city hall and pressed the souvenir that was once your finger against its lips.”It ends by stating that the city of 47,000 “is anchored in white supremacy and rooted in racism. “This is a new era of Black electeds,” said Wes Bellamy, a friend of Walker’s, a former Charlottesville vice mayor and interim chair of Virginia State University’s political science department. “And so in this way, Mayor Walker is 100% in line with Black women elected officials, not just mayors but those who are serving in Congress,” Brown said. But, Brown added, Walker's words could also provide fuel to those pushing back against the nation's current reckoning with its past. Among them is Peter Snyder, an entrepreneur and former Fox News contributor who lives in Charlottesville.
Noose found hanging from tree outside a church near Capitol Hill
Noose found hanging from tree outside a church near Capitol HillAdded: 27.03.2021 20:18 | 7 views | 0 commentsSt. Mark's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., has a Black Lives Matter banner on the front of the building.
Biden Doesn’t Need to Be FDR or LBJ to Change America
Thus, in 2008, Barack Obama touted his ambition to change “the trajectory of America” in the same way that Ronald Reagan had done. By May 2020, Biden himself was broadcasting an ambition to be the next FDR. As Ackerman writes:Biden’s COVID relief plan is what you would have expected a President Joe Biden to pass in an emergency. The Biden coalition may be incapable of delivering a Great Society, but a markedly better one is within reach. In terms of partisan polarization, early Biden looks more like early Trump than he does like any previous president.
Good Trouble's Zuri Adele Talks Normalizing Black Joy, Romance, and Everyday Lives Onscreen
Image Source: FreeformAs a Black woman who loves TV, I'm always going to give a show starring another Black woman a chance. What what would you say are some of the differences between Malika from season one versus now in season three? Image Source: FreeformZA: Right, right, right. ZA: I agree, I don't think Malika needs to be conventional for a while, if at all. I want to keep normalizing our joyful experiences, our romances, our everyday lives, and the scars on our hearts.
What to expect at the Derek Chauvin murder trial
The quest to seat the jury in the high-profile murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has reached the finish line. Chauvin — who, along with the three other officers involved, was immediately fired following the incident — has been charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. Meanwhile, the prosecution will have to prove that Chauvin’s actions during the arrest ultimately caused Floyd’s death. Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill rejected Nelson’s motions, though, saying Chauvin wouldn’t get a fairer trial anywhere else. “It’s an insult to Black Minneapolis residents because we have to forgo our bias and lived experiences all the time to fit in the system.
The Identity Hoaxers
From the start, Munchausen syndrome had a social component as well as a medical one. We hear more about the Holocaust hoaxers and the 9/11 fakers because these are internationally famous, political tragedies. In the hierarchy of suffering, it’s at the pinnacle.”The notion of needing “to be associated with the victims rather than the perpetrators” is what sent me down the rabbit hole of identity hoaxers. There is no parallel form of my adulthood connected to white people or a white community or an alternative white identity.” She claimed to be, in the popular phrase, living her truth—even though her truth was a charade. But people closer to these hoaxers, and closer to the pain they cause, tend to have a less forgiving view.
Police Are Investigating A Possible Hate Crime After A Noose Was Found Outside A Church In DC
A noose was found hanging from a tree outside The St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Washington D.C. on Friday morning. A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Department told BuzzFeed News that the incident is being investigated as a possible hate crime. The church’s reverend said they prayed with police officers and church staff after the noose was removed from the tree in a note posted on the church’s website. I know that this symbol causes fear in people's hearts,” Reverend Michele Morgan said in a statement. The church has received “overwhelming” support from the community and past parishioners following the incident, Morgan said.
Biden walks the union line, making a play for blue-collar workers
Seth Harris, now a top labor adviser to Biden, wrote a script for a Biden video promoting the union effort. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) wrote an op-ed voicing carefully calibrated support for the Amazon union drive. ADIn his first two months, Biden has aggressively sought to cement support from unions and workers. While Biden has positioned himself staunchly alongside the Amazon workers, he also has some associations with the company through his vast political network. Jay Carney, Biden’s communications director when he was vice president, is now a senior vice president at Amazon.
DPS board member Tay Anderson denies sexual assault allegation
Denver Public Schools board member Tay Anderson said Saturday that an allegation of sexual assault made by a local chapter of Black Lives Matter on behalf of an anonymous woman is untrue. On Friday, Black Lives Matter 5280 published a public statement saying a woman came to the group in February alleging Anderson had sexually assaulted her. “I am not aware of any actions of mine that could be considered or construed as sexual assault. I am not aware of any past partners who have considered anything I’ve done sexual assault,” Anderson’s statement said. In its statement, BLM5280 said it will separate itself from Anderson until he responds.
Cops Hired by Amazon Are Intimidating Workers and Supporters of the Union Drive
If this union vote is successful, it will be the first union of Amazon workers in the United States. We arrived at the Bessemer facility to stand in solidarity with the workers and take footage of the facility. Left Voice reporters stopped by Bessemer police and Amazon security while filming a solidarity report in front of the Amazon BHM1 facility. Amazon has hired off-duty cops to moonlight as security on the premises to harass union supporters and workers. If Bessemer workers are successful in their union drive, then they will join the ranks of the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union (RWDSU), which is an affiliate of the AFL-CIO.
Silver Knights forward co-authors children’s book on race, diversity
Silver Knights forward Jermaine Loewen co-authored an illustrated children’s book during the offseason that centers around the themes of race and kindness. The Henderson Silver Knights' Tyrell Goulbourne (12) chats with Jermaine Loewen (54) during a team practice at Lifeguard Arena in Henderson, on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021. Before he does that, the Silver Knights winger started by writing something a little shorter. This season, Loewen has appeared in 10 games for the Silver Knights with one assist and nine penalty minutes. Milestone for O’ReganForward Danny O’Regan assisted on the Silver Knights’ first goal in Wednesday’s 5-2 loss to Colorado for his 200th career point in the AHL.
'I assumed they were treating us fairly:' Why can't NCAA get women's basketball right?
Quote iconWomen’s college basketball is on many radar screens now – and not just for the controversy. And then on Friday, he apologized to the women's basketball players. “We have a game for college men’s basketball that doesn’t match every other aspect of our game including women. Over an eight-month span, she put together what became known as the Division I Women’s Basketball White Paper. In discussing interviews that allowed hundreds of people connected with women’s basketball to have input, Ackerman wrote: “My principal observation from the interviews is that there is a tremendous appetite for change in the way Division I women’s basketball is played, marketed and managed.
Noose found hanging from tree outside a church near Capitol Hill
A noose was found hanging from a tree outside a church in Washington, D.C., on Friday morning. D.C. Councilman Charles Allen first posted about the incident on Twitter, describing it as a "despicable symbol & act of hate." A noose was found today at St Marks Episcopal Church on the Hill. pic.twitter.com/ClJDwHZnWm — Charles Allen (@charlesallen) March 26, 2021Officers at the scene took the noose down from the large tree it was found on and kept it for evidence, NBC Washington reported. “That symbol has no business being in our country, in our city and certainly not in a church courtyard,” she said.
Charlottesville mayor’s poem about city, racism ‘hits nerve’
(Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress via AP, File)America’s Black politicians have a long history of calling out the nation’s racism. Charlottesville, she wrote , “lynched you, hung the noose at city hall and pressed the souvenir that was once your finger against its lips.”It ends by stating that the city of 47,000 “is anchored in white supremacy and rooted in racism. “You all said you were open to being challenged.”Bellamy, who lives in Charlottesville, told the AP that the city has made a lot of improvements in recent years. “And so in this way, Mayor Walker is 100% in line with Black women elected officials, not just mayors but those who are serving in Congress,” Brown said. Among them is Peter Snyder, an entrepreneur and former Fox News contributor who lives in Charlottesville.
Charlottesville mayor's poem about city, racism 'hits nerve'
Walker said on Facebook Live that she was clear about who she was from the beginning. "You all said you were open to being challenged.”Bellamy, who lives in Charlottesville, told the AP that the city has made a lot of improvements in recent years. “I’ve had a lot of people say she told it exactly like it is,” he said of Walker. And many have taken to social media to advance social justice causes, such as Black Lives Matter. “And so in this way, Mayor Walker is 100% in line with Black women elected officials, not just mayors but those who are serving in Congress,” Brown said.
'I assumed they were treating us fairly:' Why can't NCAA get women's basketball right?
Quote iconWomen’s college basketball is on many radar screens now – and not just for the controversy. And then on Friday, he apologized to the women's basketball players. “We have a game for college men’s basketball that doesn’t match every other aspect of our game including women. Over an eight-month span, she put together what became known as the Division I Women’s Basketball White Paper. In discussing interviews that allowed hundreds of people connected with women’s basketball to have input, Ackerman wrote: “My principal observation from the interviews is that there is a tremendous appetite for change in the way Division I women’s basketball is played, marketed and managed.
Phoenix is a national embarrassment in the anti-Asian hate movement. We must do better
Metro Phoenix has been one of the nation’s fastest-growing areas for years, creating a boom in real estate prices and business opportunities in countless sectors. Already, Arizona has to reconcile its reputation as the state that tried to make it illegal to drive while Latino. Especially in a metro area where a plan to create a Phoenix civilian review board with independent powers to investigate claims of police brutality was rejected. Especially in a metro area where a 74-year-old Asian man was attacked by a stranger and skeptics respond by debating whether it was a hate crime. Metro Phoenix has been one of the nation’s fastest-growing areas for years.
Floyd spurred broad push for change globally, activists say
Still, group co-founder Sam Sinyangwe said, “There are some shifts happening. “What the Black Lives Matter movement has done is use these various incidents to allow us to reevaluate the underlying cultural narrative,” said David Hooker, associate professor of the practice of conflict transformation and peacebuilding at Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs. Hooker, Wallace and others say that narrative — with its neat assignment of people into “good” and “bad” categories — promotes violence against racial minorities and aims to keep them from flourishing. Floyd, they say, is a perfect example: Here was a man who was once imprisoned but was striving to make a better life for himself and his family. His life mattered more than the few, less-savory details about his past that had been reported in the press and that could come up in his accused killer’s trial, said Wallace, who is also a member of the Movement for Black Lives' national policy leadership team.
If Teen Vogue can fire an editor for her teenage tweets, no one is safe
Earlier this month, Alexi McCammond was named editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue. However, after her appointment, there was an internal revolt among Teen Vogue staff after more than 20 employees discovered McCammond’s decade-old tweets and sent a letter condemning them — and their new editor-in-chief — to the management of Condé-Nast. Other tweets included stereotypes of Asian academic overachievement and the usage of the terms “homo” and “gay” in a derogatory manner. However, McCammond was at the formative age of 17 when she sent those tweets — and has profusely apologized since, including in 2019. It’s possible that I’ve already preemptively canceled myself because of one of my teenage mistakes in the past years (or even months) that may be considered a cancelable offense in five, or 10, years time.
Floyd spurred broad push for change globally, activists say
As Minneapolis braces for Monday’s opening statements in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the ex-officer who is charged with murder and manslaughter in George Floyd’s death, so does the world. ADVERTISEMENTThis time the victim was George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black father of five captured in a sickening citizen video taking his final breaths under a white officer’s knee. “George Floyd has taken systemic racism from personal problem to America’s issue,” Wallace said. “You’ll march for George Floyd,” the activist said, “but would you have hired him?”____Morrison reported from New York City. ___Find the AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd___Morrison is a member of the AP’s Race and Ethnicity team.
Noose found in courtyard of Episcopal church on Capitol Hill
St. Mark’s, a stately, historical church a block from the U.S. Capitol, has had two Black Lives Matter banners stolen off the red brick building in the past year, Morgan said. The first, put up after the death of George Floyd in police custody, said: “All Lives Matter Only If Black Lives Matter: Let’s take seriously the injustices and wrongs that are right in front of us.” The second read: “Our Witness Remains The Same: Black Lives Matter.” The third, which is still up, is the same as the first. St. Mark’s is majority White and relatively high-profile, with an idyllic public courtyard with benches and pathways and a dramatic wood-and-brick nave inside where arts groups hold events. A vocal ensemble has for the last two weeks rented out St. Mark’s to rehearse a performance about the crucifixion that features a Black Jesus. A group of preschoolers who are taught inside the church started to come out to play in the courtyard, like they do every day, she said.
How Court TV is covering the George Floyd trial: 'This is American history in the making'
The difference is that this trial is being held at a courthouse about 15 minutes away from where George Floyd died, and they're pulling the jury from the same community. The U.S. House just passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, and that kind of legislation isn't bound by what happens with Derek Chauvin one way or the other. They don't want George Floyd to be put on trial — they want Derek Chauvin to be put on trial. One item that's already come up is whether or not there are similarities to a 2019 arrest where there was body cam footage of George Floyd. Court TV's coverage of Minnesota v. Derek Chauvin begins March 29.
Volkswagen to seek dieselgate damages from former CEO, Audi boss
A House subcommittee hearing on Wednesday took a look at domestic terrorism at the state and local level, from prosecutors’ perspectives. The former heads of congressional security, and particularly disgraced Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, traded accusations of irresponsibility during high-profile hearings in February. Short of that, these hearings should continue.”Members of Congress have not utterly shrunk from holding those responsible for Jan. 6 to account. Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), who spoke at the rally on Jan. 6, is kicking off a bid for U.S. Senate. After 9/11, the first inquiry came from the joint congressional intelligence committees, which looked at intelligence failures in isolation.
GOP eyes Albuquerque congressional seat held by Haaland
Aragon, an admirer of Rush Limbaugh, has cast himself as a political outsider with hardline positions against public unions and enduring support for former President Donald Trump's stalled border wall project. “They're literally passing themselves off as the American way,” Aragon said. He backed a Republican bill to legalize recreational cannabis in 2019 — he says to keep Democratic legislation at bay — and acknowledged accepting campaign donations from the marijuana industry. Other Republican candidates include attorney and Clovis native Jared Vander Dussen and Michaela Chavez, a bookkeeper who unsuccessfully ran last year for state Senate. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.
'Shameful': Florida House Passes GOP's Anti-Protest Bill
Decrying the passage of House Bill 1 in the Florida legislature on Friday, the state's ACLU chapter warned that if the undemocratic anti-protest bill pushed by Republican Gov. —Micah Kubic, ACLU of Florida"It is shameful that this bill has passed in the House," Micah Kubic, executive director of the ACLU of Florida, said in a statement. "We've said it before and will state it again," Kubic continued: "This bill is not intended to increase public safety. Over 95% of protests across the state of Florida have been peaceful." HB 1, the anti-protest bill, is being debated on the Florida House floor today.
The class issues behind the unionization drive at Amazon
No doubt, these Amazon workers are looking for a way to fight the company. But when a capitalist politician claims to support the “rights” of workers, workers should check their wallets. Behind their claims of support for Amazon workers, ulterior motives are at work, in accordance with a definite class strategy. Under these conditions, the ruling class needs a mechanism for disciplining the working class and channeling its anger. With the assistance of the WSWS and the SEP, workers are building a rapidly growing network of such committees among teachers, autoworkers, healthcare workers and Amazon workers.
Atlantic City to spend $36G, repaint Black Lives Matter street mural that left drivers confused
A Black Lives Matter pavement mural that covered both sides of a street in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in yellow paint, obscuring yellow lane markers, will be repainted for safety reasons, the city said. The sheer amount of yellow paint on the street was confusing drivers, many of whom didn’t know where to drive on the road, according to officials. "We tried to work through the issue with the Department of Transportation," Small said of the original paint job, according to The Press of Atlantic City. BLM ACTIVIST ARRESTED IN RELATION TO LINCOLN STATUE DEFACEMENT IN IDAHOThe mural was a compromise between Black Lives Matter activists who wanted it painted on the famous Atlantic City boardwalk and city officials who refused that idea. He said he'd also be in favor of moving the mural to another street, according to the newspaper.
Trump falsely claims Jan. 6 rioters were ‘hugging and kissing’ police
“Look, they went in — they shouldn’t have done it — some of them went in, and they’re hugging and kissing the police and the guards, you know? A lot of the people were waved in, and then they walked in, and they walked out.”ADAccounts from that day immediately shatter Trump’s attempt at revisionist history. Many officers suffered concussions and other bodily injuries from being beaten with flagpoles, sprayed with bear spray, punched, dragged and trampled. More than 300 people have been charged since the attack that resulted in five deaths and 130 police assaults. ADTrump is not the only Republican to downplay the severity of the Jan. 6 attack.
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signs voting bill under portrait of a slave plantation
Internet sleuths dug up ties to slavery in the history of a painting under which Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) signed a bill imposing new voting restrictions that critics say would disenfranchise the state's Black voters. Will Bunch, author and opinion columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, tweeted out the finding and the history of the portrait, "Brickhouse Road -- Callaway [Plantation],” claiming "the symbolism is no accident." Notice the antebellum-style portrait behind Kemp as he signs the suppression law? But plantation weddings have been criticized for glorifying the era of slavery in United States history and not acknowledging the violent and racist past of these plantations.
Georgia activists call for Coca-Cola boycott over ‘deafening silence’ on voting rights
Bishop Reginald Thomas Jackson, the presiding prelate, said that there had been a “deafening silence” around voting rights from Coca-Cola and other companies that had put out statements last year supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. But those major companies have declined to speak out directly against the bills. Coca-Cola told the Guardian earlier this month it supported both chambers of commerce and a “balanced approach to elections”. Georgia lawmakers will probably hammer out a final version of sweeping voting changes before the legislative session ends next week. But at the same time, we think all of these major companies have responsibilities on issues of social justice.”
Two more tied to Proud Boys hit with conspiracy charges in Jan. 6 Capitol breach
ADADU.S. Magistrate Zia M. Faruqui of Washington, D.C., ordered the younger Klein detained after a video teleconference hearing Friday. He was wearing body armor and goggles and carrying a baseball bat and a paintball gun, chasing one person who was beaten by a person seen with Klein, prosecutors alleged. ADThey accuse the men of entering the Capitol through a door on its northwest side, where the younger Klein allegedly celebrated with an unnamed Proud Boys member. The panel also directed the trial judge to consider how judges have treated similarly situated defendants. The judge did order a third co-defendant, Meggs’s husband, Kelly Meggs, 52, jailed pending trial.
Arizona GOP lawmakers want felony charge for protesters who damage statues
Bob ChristieAssociated PressRepublicans in the Arizona Legislature are reacting to last year's wave of damage to Confederate monuments by civil rights protesters here and across the nation by working to make it a felony to damage or destroy any public or private monument or statue. Rep. John Kavanagh supported his proposal at a Senate committee hearing on Thursday by saying public monuments are a statement by the community that demand more protection. The proposal adds defacing a monument or statue to existing law that makes it an aggravated felony offense to deface a cemetery headstone or church. Scores of Confederate statues, monuments or markers were removed from public land across the country after Floyd's death. "There's never an excuse to break the law to enforce a point," said GOP Sen. Wendy Rogers of Flagstaff.
Amazon Hires Off-Duty Cops to Harass Workers, the Press, and Supporters
If this union vote is successful, it will be the first union of Amazon workers in the United States. We arrived at the Bessemer facility to stand in solidarity with the workers and take footage of the facility. Left Voice reporters stopped by Bessemer police and Amazon security while filming a solidarity report in front of the Amazon BHM1 facility. Amazon has hired off-duty cops to moonlight as security on the premises to harass union supporters and workers. You might be interested in: No Pigs Allowed: Let’s Kick Cops out of our UnionsCops are not workers.
Tucker Carlson Justifies the Idea of a Full-Blown Fascist Takeover
For years, Tucker Carlson has used his Fox News program to flirt with fascist and white nationalist talking points. Why should I be a good citizen if they don’t have to follow the rules?’” Carlson said. “I mean, things kind of break down at some point, don’t they?”“They will break down, they are breaking down, Tucker,” Kelly replied. Jesse Kelly, thank you.”Up until this Tucker Carlson Tonight appearance, Kelly’s most notable contribution to the discourse included one essay calling for the U.S. to split up––or else––and another fantasizing about Americans killing each other over political disagreements. — Leak of Bombshell CBS Investigation Led to Multimillion-Dollar Settlement— From the Archive: The Day Before Tragedy— Not a subscriber?
“I’ve Got to Do Something. I’ve Got to Say Something”: A Conversation With CNN’s Don Lemon
The Black Lives Matter protests of 2020 catalyzed Black Americans far and wide, and CNN’s Don Lemon, the only African American cable-news anchor in prime time, was no different. Lemon joins Inside the Hive to discuss his best-selling new book, This Is the Fire: What I Say to My Friends About Racism. In it, Lemon describes how the Trump years exposed America’s racial wounds, but also cleared the way for a new era of accountability. “People are being held accountable, and they cannot just say something bigoted or racist or insensitive or inappropriate with impunity anymore,” Lemon observes. Join Vanity Fair to receive full access to VF.com and the complete online archive now.
Dem Hearings Bend Over Backward to Ignore GOP Complicity in Capitol Riot
The Senate hearings revealed an abiding interest in pinpointing intelligence and security failures ahead of and during the insurrection. A House subcommittee hearing on Wednesday took a look at domestic terrorism at the state and local level, from prosecutors’ perspectives. The former heads of congressional security, and particularly disgraced Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, traded accusations of irresponsibility during high-profile hearings in February. ”The hearings’ most poignant moments may have come from Walker, whose frustration over the Pentagon suppressing the Guard’s arrival was powerful. Short of that, these hearings should continue.”Members of Congress have not utterly shrunk from holding those responsible for Jan. 6 to account.
The High Cost of Georgia’s Restrictive Voting Bills
Illustration by João FazendaEarlier this month, both of the Republican-controlled chambers of the Georgia legislature passed bills that would impede voting, particularly for African-Americans. The Senate bill would cut mobile voting facilities, end no-excuse absentee voting, and require people who are qualified to vote absentee to provide a witness’s signature on the ballot envelope. Lewis helped lead the fight for the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. That law is justly celebrated in the civil-rights center, even as its intent is being eviscerated in the capitol. Last Wednesday, Warnock delivered his first speech on the Senate floor, and tied the cause of voting rights to the fight over the filibuster.
Mitt Romney Receives JFK Profile in Courage Award for Voting to Convict Trump
Romney, 74, is the 2021 recipient of the annual Profile in Courage Award, the foundation announced on Friday. "The 2021 Profile in Courage Award goes to Senator Mitt Romney for his vote to convict President Donald J. Trump in 2020, and his consistent and courageous defense of democracy," the official announcement reads. Mitt Romney Image zoom Mitt Romney | Credit: Bill Clark/CQ Roll CallRomney spoke to the Today show on Friday about the award, saying he was "very appreciative" and "also humbled by it." Romney twice voted to convict Trump, and several other Republicans joined him in the second trial. Mitt Romney, Donald Trump Image zoom Mitt Romney (L); Donald Trump | Credit: Felix Hörhager/picture alliance via Getty; MANDEL NGAN/AFP via GettyRELATED VIDEO: Mitt Romney Joins Black Lives Matter Protest in Washington, D.C., as Trump Mocks HimRomney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee who has long been a vocal critic of Trump's, confirmed in October that he did not vote for Trump in November.
TikToker Alleges Madonna Photoshopped Her Head onto Her Own Body: 'I Wish I Was Credited'
"I think if you're going to play somebody else's body off as your own, they deserve to be mentioned. Amelia Goldie told BuzzfeedTikToker Alleges Madonna Photoshopped Her Head onto Her Own Body: 'I Wish I Was Credited'A woman named Amelia Goldie is alleging that Madonna photoshopped her face onto her body in a photo she posted six years ago, while promoting her album Rebel Heart. "I look Kewl … ?? #rebelheart," Madonna captioned her May 1, 2015, Instagram post featuring the allegedly photoshopped image of herself. While a rep for Madonna has not responded to PEOPLE's request for comment, Goldie told Buzzfeed in an interview published Thursday that she thought the post "was a joke" at first. RELATED VIDEO: Kendall Jenner Sets the Record Straight on "Photoshopped" Black Lives Matter PhotoAnother person who recently recalled an "awkward" Madonna moment?
Microsoft Buying Discord Would Be 2021’s Best Acquisition
Kara Swisher: Microsoft is in talks to acquire Discord, a social media for video gamers. It’s been a huge year for video-gaming companies, and Microsoft has bolstered much of its gaming business with acquisitions. Scott Galloway: The best acquisition of 2020 — and I don’t like the company, but it was the best acquisition of 2020 — was when Uber acquired Postmates and diversified away. That’s really powerful, really powerful. I think you’re right: Microsoft has done such a great job of keeping a low profile.
Watch Sacha Baron Cohen Discuss Trial of Chicago 7, Activism
On Friday, Sacha Baron Cohen participated in Netflix’s Chicago 7 Town Hall: Voices for Change, a virtual town hall event centered around discussing the Chicago 7 activists and the recent feature film based on them, which Baron Cohen starred in. He’s up for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role as activist Abbie Hoffman. “We discussed what’s the purpose of making a movie,” he said, “because making a movie is ultimately a massive hassle. It was an incredible coincidence, a lucky coincidence, that we made it and then the Black Lives Matter protests happened. The movie became increasingly relevant.”The hour-long town hall event also featured Sorkin, as well as actor and activist Baratunde Thurston; activist Dolores Huerta; Watergate prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks; original Chicago 7 member Lee Weiner; and actor and activist Olivia Munn.
A new way to view homelessness: Not as a problem but as a culture
“I’m trying to show they actually have agency and are using rational thought.” A year later, their fundamental view has not changed. Among anthropologists, this is “material culture” — from soda bottle caps to propane heaters — and studying it can help researchers understand how to help those living on the margins. Some people end up living in encampments because they think shelters are unsafe, or they avoid shelters because they don’t want structure. “There is a culture within the homeless community for people to be responsible, to help each other,” Sheptock told me. But focusing on violence or exploitation in encampments rather than on the mutual aid practiced there denies homeless people agency, Howe says.
George Floyd: When does Derek Chauvin's trial start?
Onlookers in the US city of Minneapolis recorded Mr Chauvin - who's white - kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, who was black. A shop assistant believed he had used a counterfeit $20 bill and called the police after Mr Floyd refused to give the cigarettes back. A struggle ended with Mr Floyd face down on the street. Mr Chauvin, 44, placed his left knee on Mr Floyd's neck, and kept it there for more than nine minutes, according to prosecutors. When is the Derek Chauvin trial?
Mitt Romney Receives JFK Profile in Courage Award for Voting to Convict Trump
Alex Wong/Getty Mitt RomneyThe same impeachment vote that drew scorn from the GOP base has now made Sen. Mitt Romney a winner of the Profile in Courage Award. Romney, 74, is the 2021 recipient of the annual Profile in Courage Award, the foundation announced on Friday. "The 2021 Profile in Courage Award goes to Senator Mitt Romney for his vote to convict President Donald J. Trump in 2020, and his consistent and courageous defense of democracy," the official announcement reads. "As the first Senator to have ever voted to convict a President of his own party, Senator Romney's courageous stand was historic." Romney twice voted to convict Trump, and several other Republicans joined him in the second trial.
San Francisco: Hundreds rally against anti-Asian American violence
Spurred to action by recent violent attacks in Atlanta and the Bay Area, hundreds of protesters gathered in San Francisco on Friday to rally against anti-Asian American hate. Here are a few:Friday: “Rise up with Asians” peaceful rally.” 12:30 p.m., Union Square, San FranciscoSaturday: “Stop Asian Hate” rally. 11 a.m., meet at St. Mary’s Square, San Francisco for a vigil for the victims of the Atlanta attacks. “# Stop Asian Hate” rally. “Stop Asian Hate!
Police use of force focus of Nevada reform bill
Nevada lawmakers on Thursday took aim at law enforcement policies on use of deadly force and protest response, legislation that is a major part of Democrats’ push this session on policing reforms. Senate Bill 212, which was heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee, would require police officers to use de-escalation techniques and, if it can be done safely, identify themselves as law enforcement before resorting to deadly force. Sen. Ira Hansen, R-Sparks, questioned the credentials and expertise of Sinyangwe and the others from Campaign Zero who helped present the bill. But Harris said she had worked with law enforcement groups on the bill, and some, including the Metropolitan Police Department, Washoe County Sheriff’s Office and the Nevada Sheriff’s and Chief’s Association, testified in support of the bill during the hearing. And while law enforcement agencies testified in support, the unions for Las Vegas police officers and and supervisors were opposed to the changes.
A Police Union Contract Puts Taxpayers on the Hook to Defend Officers When the City Won’t
A Police Union Contract Puts Taxpayers on the Hook to Defend Officers When the City Won’t A little-known labor contract provision obligates New Yorkers to help pay officers’ legal bills in lawsuits that city lawyers won’t defend. It looked like the city was cutting the cop loose, a step rarely taken in the hundreds of lawsuits filed every year against NYPD officers. That’s because every year, the city treasury effectively bankrolls a union-controlled legal defense fund for officers. Though the defense fund has existed for decades, there has been little scrutiny of it. A person who answered a cellphone number listed for D’Andraia hung up when ProPublica called and inquired about the officer's defense.
The Porch Pirate of Potrero Hill Can’t Believe It Came to This
Link CopiedThe first time Ganave Fairley got busted for stealing a neighbor’s Amazon package, she was just another porch thief unlucky to be caught on tape. “She looked groomed, slept, and fed,” Arnold told me later. And in Potrero, Fairley and the neighbors weren’t done with each other yet. (Fairley told me she wasn’t interested in talking about the videos.) That will require having a home, so Fairley told me she applied for the public housing wait lists in San Francisco and nearby counties.
The Estranged Wife Of The Leader Of The Oath Keepers Just Launched A GoFundMe To Pay For Her Divorce
The estranged wife of Stewart Rhodes, the founder and leader of the Oath Keepers, an armed extremist group, has launched an online fundraiser to help pay for her divorce. Adams wrote that the current “spotlight” on her husband emboldened her to seek financial help. In addition, photos and other evidence show that Oath Keepers had provided personal security in Washington the previous day for Roger Stone and others close to former president Donald Trump. Members of the Oath Keepers were in Nevada and Oregon at standoffs with federal agents over grazing rights on federal land. A frequent guest on Alex Jones’ online show Infowars, Rhodes has often used those events to draw attention to the Oath Keepers, boosting membership and raising money through donations.
The Diversity Gap In The Skin Care Industry: What To Know
Here’s why representation is so important, and what still needs to be done to address the lack of diversity in the skin care industry. Why BIPOC Representation In Skin Care Is So ImportantA lot of what the industry knows about skin has been studied “in white skin or lighter skin,” says Harvey. The State Of Inclusivity In The Beauty WorldIt wasn't until lately that experts have noticed been a reactive charge within the skin care and beauty industry. Both were addressing the problematic advertising lingo that called for skin care products to lighten the skin, which was — up until pretty recently — commonplace in beauty product packaging. No Longer Invisible: Understanding the Psychosocial Impact of Skin Color Stratification in the Lives of African American Women.
In a nation founded on whiteness, how to really discuss it?
“We have all these other ways to not talk about race and white supremacy and white nationalism,” says the Rev. That’s something white Americans must wrestle with, as Chesnut sees it. “White supremacy is destroying us, too and I don’t think we talk enough about that.”Or about much having to do with whiteness. Laurissa Steadman, a conservative and a Trump supporter, says it’s easier for white Americans who are liberal to speak about their politics than it is for white conservatives. “We as white people need to be gathering up our white people.”But getting white Americans to genuinely wrestle with these issues, Jardina says, will be a struggle.
Prince George’s County’s new police chief will be Malik Aziz, a deputy chief from Dallas
Aziz is currently deputy chief of the department in Dallas. “I want the citizens and the officers of Prince George’s County to understand what type of police chief I will be, and that is one of communication and high visibility,” Aziz said at the news conference. ADADDuring the Friday news conference, Aziz said the nation is the throes of a “reformation era” defined by a crisis in police-community relations. “Being a Black man in America is something I can’t run away from,” Aziz told TMJ4 in Milwaukee last year. Aziz has been with the Dallas Police since 1992 and has held an array of titles inside and outside the department, including as a deputy chief for four years before he was demoted during a leadership reorganization that decreased the size of the command staff.
Don’t be shocked: COVID-era crime anxiety has sparked TASER sales
The trauma of all that death and disease: Was a jump in violent crime as predictable as subway delays? But for any cop or citizen, the COVID-era trend is unsettling, even if the base of comparison is historically low. It’s all added up to a spike in anxiety even sharper than the rise in actual crime. Rising guns sales, the usual measure of crime fear across America, don’t reveal much about the anxiety quotient in New York, where relatively few civilians are legally permitted to own firearms. But at this time of rising crime and COVID-sparked anxiety, will people really arm themselves with nonlethal devices that shoot electrified darts instead of bullets?
Anti-riot bill passes sharply split Florida House, heads to Senate
TALLAHASSEE – A sharply divided Florida House passed a bill Friday to impose harsher penalties on rioters, a major priority of Gov. Ron DeSantis and a measure that supporters say is meant to curb the violence in the wake of some of the Black Lives Matter protests last summer.
Oregon brothers accused of storming U.S. Capitol ordered held pending trial
Oregon brothers Matthew Leland Klein and Jonathanpeter Allen Klein, who are accused of storming the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, were ordered Friday to be held in custody pending trial on six felony charges. “The exact example of what the court gave is what the defendant has done,” Faruqui said during Jonathanpeter Klein’s hearing. He was actively involved,” Faruqui ruled during Jonathanpeter Klein’s hearing. The Klein brothers were living with their parents in South America until February 2020. Their parents lived as missionaries in Argentina and Chile, where Jonathanpeter Klein volunteered as a translator, Sweet said.
Wikipedia Editor Temporarily Banned for Criticizing Use of ‘Tree’ as Pronoun
The Wikipedia page for actor Keiynan Lonsdale became a battlefield in the fight over “preferred pronouns” due to a Twitter thread noting Lonsdale once suggested “tree” as his preferred pronoun. Despite doubts about Lonsdale’s sincerity, editors repeatedly changed the male pronouns on his article to “tree” this past week until an editor sought a compromise by removing pronouns entirely. One editor who criticized the move and denigrated the idea of “tree” as a pronoun was banned for a week. I want to call my friends ‘tree’ and me ‘tree’ and everyone ‘tree.’ So, I think, like now, when people ask me what my preferred pronoun is, I’m going to say ‘tree.’”Editors on Wikipedia have tried to add the “tree” pronoun to Lonsdale’s page on Wikipedia since then, and were repeatedly rejected. After a user suggested not using “tree” as Lonsdale’s pronoun was “transphobic” as well, EEng retorted that using “tree” as a pronoun “is lunacy.
Hundreds of schools in England sign up for anti-racist curriculum
In the absence of government-led change to the national curriculum, grassroots groups have offered schemes to help schools improve. More than 660 schools in England have signed up to a diverse and anti-racist curriculum developed by teachers and council staff in the London borough of Hackney, for example. Natalie Russell, the organisation’s head of delivery and development, said many teachers lacked the confidence to provide a diverse curriculum because they had not been taught about black history. It does provide a sense of shared belonging and understanding.”In collaboration with the Black Curriculum, the Manchester Gorton MP, Afzal Khan, announced a diverse curriculum charter for schools in his constituency. Khan, who is of Pakistani heritage, said he hoped all schools across Greater Manchester would sign up to the charter.
Don't post the yellow square
Don't post the yellow square Presented by IntelWith help from Teresa Wiltz. A message from Intel: Intel knows that talent is everywhere but opportunity is not. | Alex Wong/Getty ImagesTHE RECAST: We’re also seeing the rise of “performative allyship,” aka “If you posted a black square, then where’s your yellow square?”TRAN: Yellow square! Don’t post the yellow square! Meghan McCain: "We’ve only had one Asian American host co-host host this show.
Evanston's reparations plan is a noble start to a complicated process, experts say
But experts say Evanston's plan is a noble start to a complicated process. But when you’re talking about historic discrimination, housing subsidies was a significant part of that. "It will have little, if any, impact on the lives of the other approximately 12,000 Black Evanston residents," Glanton's column reads. “The city of Evanston’s remedy plan was always centered around the localized harm that Black residents in Evanston faced. That means looking at the local policies, laws, practices that were anti-Black and discriminatory and how they impacted the Black residents there.
Kenosha police: 55 more charged for violence during protests
The Detroit NewsKenosha, Wis. – Fifty-five people are facing charges related to violent demonstrations in Kenosha, Wisconsin, following the police shooting of Jacob Blake last summer, police said Friday. Kenosha Officer Rusten Sheskey shot Blake seven times in August during a domestic dispute, leaving him paralyzed. Sheskey has not been charged, but Blake filed a civil lawsuit this week accusing him of using excessive force. The violent protests in Kenosha lasted for several nights. Miskinis said 49 adults and six minors are facing charges including arson, burglary, possession of a firearm or ammunition by a convicted felon, criminal damage and disorderly conduct.
Racist Brothers Facing Capitol Riot Terrorism Charges Shot Paint Balls At BLM Protesters Last Summer
Brothers Matthew and Jonathanpeter (really!) Matthew Klein, 24, was arrested in Sherwood, and Jonathanpeter Klein, 21, was arrested near Heppner on Tuesday without incident, the FBI said. They said video shows Matthew Klein helping others climb a police barricade to ascend the wall. The Seattle TimesMatthew Klein, 24, was arrested Tuesday in Sherwood and his brother, 21-year-old Jonathanpeter Klein, was arrested the same day near Heppner, the agency said. [link]Footage of Proud Boys violence taken 9/7/20 in Salem, Oregon via the FBI link above...x Proud boy chases down another BLM supporter, beats them down.